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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
the key to reducing chain and sprocket wear is to buy another motorcycle, cutting the rate of wear by half on each one. better yet, own three motorcycles. your chain and sprocket life is tripled.
Three motorcycles here. None on the road. 馃槶
Indefinite chain life.
 

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Looking at your photo, something is or at sometime has been out of alignment.
The chain plates have been salami slicing the side of the sprocket. In an ideal world where the rear wheel (and sprockets) are exactly where they need to be, the painting on the sides of the sprocket would remain in pristine condition as only the rollers would make contact with the sprocket.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Looking at your photo, something is or at sometime has been out of alignment.
The chain plates have been salami slicing the side of the sprocket. In an ideal world where the rear wheel (and sprockets) are exactly where they need to be, the painting on the sides of the sprocket would remain in pristine condition as only the rollers would make contact with the sprocket.
Thanks for the tip. It's one of a pair of bought wheels. Something I'll watch out for.
 

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Hi,
A broken chain can kill you, fit the strongest link possible-this means riveted.
I'm a bundle of nerves.
:ROFLMAO:

Triumph and BSA triples, which make far more power as standard than any of the makers' twins, were made for eight years, all were fitted new with split-link final-drive chains, they were sold all over the world - far-and-away the most in the most litigious country in the world (USA). There is not a single recorded case of the US importer being sued even unsuccessfully for a broken split-link chain.

Repeat Peg's advice to any high-mileage triple owner ... if you want to cause great hilarity; however, note the extended index fingers being rotated in circles beside temples ... :cool:

These old heaps, good-quality final-drive chain well-maintained, ime far more likely than a broken split-link is a rear-wheel puncture; rivetted link chain, total, complete, utter pita. Been there, done that, wiped my hands on the t-shirt and threw it away.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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2016 Diablo Red Thruxton 1200 R
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Oh let me see, the Gixxer front sprocket story鈥.lol oh this was many years ago when I was a young hooligan biker and I started stunting, wheelies and burn outs. Unfortunately I wasn鈥檛 sponsored yet it would of been nice鈥ol I was so addicted to ryding I felt I never had time to do maintenance until it was forced鈥.lol i was more of a Ryder then a bike mechanic at that time. I am so lucky that a disaster didn鈥檛 happened. Then I was very fortunate to become a part of a group of bad azz Ryders that were awesome bike mechanics too. So then I learned everything about bike maintenance and repair and replacement on the bikes I owned. After that bike period in my life I did a 360 and always serviced and maintained my motobikes properly as they deserved to b. Then bike maintenance lead me into bike detailing with a passion and then into motobike restomod and customizing and then doing motobike shows.
One of my close biker buddies he rode gixxers and Harley鈥檚 too ( god rest his soul he got taken out on his Harley years ago) taught motorcycle mechanics class and he would take my used and abused sprocket鈥檚, chains, tires as examples for his student to see the results of bike abuse. I was glad to contribute, what are biker buddies for..lol. I was surprised when I found this one in my old Gixxer tool box, but it brought back great memories. Like I always say I wouldn鈥檛 change a thing in my whole biker life I have lived and done so far and if I had to start over and do it all again I wouldn鈥檛 change a thing, even my close near death motobike experiences too. It鈥檚 definitely been a journey on 2 wheels in my life and I am not ready to give it up yet with 4 bikes still registered in my name. Some might say it鈥檚 motorbike addiction, I say it鈥檚 in my dna!鈥TG
 

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An O ring chain and accurate wheel alignment works for me, I use a home made laser jig and usually get the spanner鈥檚 out roughly every 6,000 miles by which time the chain has gained about 10mm of slack. It gets lubed with gear oil only after I hear the rollers buzzing.
 

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Mine鈥檚 attached to the topside of a 2ft spirit level. Attached to the underside of the level are a pair of stand-off spacers to clear the rear tyre and which rest against the rear wheel rim.
When placed against the rim with the horizontal bubble in centre the beam shines down to the front of the bike onto an old battery marked with lines measured in from each end . When the rear wheel is positioned so the laser dot measures the same distance either side of the front wheel the chain and sprockets should also be in alignment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Excellent.

You aren't doing it off the tyres, which some do, and bothers me. I'll give it a go when I've time.

How though do you measure off from the front wheel, keeping it properly aligned, not pointing slightly to one side?
 

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Hi Fledging, Normal 47t is smallest you can fit on conical hub. It is possible to fit custom made 46t with special bolts.

I would replace that sprocket. Putting new chain on worn sprocket promotes very rapid chain wear that makes chain seem low quality when it鈥檚 not.

How is front sprocket wear? Chain tension is important also. Depending on year & sprocket size you may need 107 links, so a 1/2 link is needed. T140 needed this with 20/47 sprockets.
Renold sells that chain. I鈥檝e ran 1/2 link for years without problems.

I鈥檝e been using gear lube for 30 k miles now. Has proven to reduce chain wear greatly over spray lubes. GL5 gear lube has given best chain life for me. It鈥檚 a bit messy & must be applied regularly. Riding in rain oil chain every day! No inner chain guard means rain water from tire hits chain directly.


Scott oiler is good plan, if you don鈥檛 want to lube chain frequently.

I easily get 12k miles from my chains. I only use a Renold chain as they are 107t. They last well for me. I replace chain at 50% wear as it saves the sprockets form wearing as fast.

I鈥檝e experimented with PJ Black etc. They stick tight & seem slippery, but it leaves pins after a few miles. Chain looks oily, but it鈥檚 not really lubed. In rain, chain still looks oily, but pins are rusty. Gear oil seems more weather resistant in the pins. Most chain wear is in pins that鈥檚 where the lube needs to be.

I鈥檝e not seen oring chain that clears my cases at boss for layshaft bearing.

When you get your new sprocket it has inside & outside. The bevel on inside edge goes against brake drum. Make sure the bolts are good & tight.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Hello Don

The engine, front sprocket and chain are all original and left factory together. They have only 3,000 miles use. The chain is Reynolds, and will presumably fit. I'll make a note of the 107t, thanks, for when I replace it.

The rear wheel is a replacement, so sprocket has more miles than them, almost certainly. So, thanks, I'll replace the rear sprocket. I've ordered a UK-made (LF Harris, I think) 47 teeth. Cost about 拢10 more than a sprocket with no given place of manufacture.

Thanks. I was thinking of using gear oil as lube, I'll do as you, then, that's settled! My other bike gets gear oil from a tiny leak at the primary socket. I know you won't approve! Works well though! I don't find the gear oil messy, just wipe from inside of rear guard and licence plate occasionally, and less occasionally from wheel rim.
 

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Hi, Exactly what year bike? The length of chain depends on year & sprockets.

That sprocket seems too worn for 3k miles?? Are we wrong on wear? Photos can sometimes give false impression.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Don, the back sprocket is of unknown origin. Came on the replacement wheel I bought.
The engine, front sprocket and chain are all 3,300 miles of use and left Meriden together.

The engine, chain, front sprocket is 1979. I've opened the gearbox, looks good. Rest of engine never opened.

The rear sprocket is from a 1975 bike. It's off a Bonneville, but being 1975, it's a 19" wheel. The factory sit-in perhaps means the wheel was intended for a triple. We'll never know.

So, the back sprocket has more miles on in, judging by the wear.

I've not tried fitting the chain yet, I'll wait until new back sprocket arrives. Does it still sound 170t to you?
 

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Hi,
Scottoilers
:oops: Forgot this in my previous post.

only complaint I have seen is the cost of the lubricant.
Never bought any on its own, Fraser Scott is very generous with the amount of oil he includes with his kits, compared to how much is used once the owner's figured out the chain's being lubed without lubing the back of the bike. (y)

I suspect, without properly knowing, that the special lubricant used has a constant cleaning effect as well as constant lubrication.
Sort-of.

Delivery tube end positioned as advised in the destructions, the oil droplets are delivered to the top of the chain's bottom run just as it goes on to the rear sprocket. As oil is constantly being added, this promotes movement first around and along both (inner and outer) roller surfaces and then to the outside of the chain. Road grit and other debris landing on the outside of the chain sticks to the lube on the outside of the chain, centripetal force as the chain turns around the sprockets flicks off the lube-'n'-debris mix. (y)

Those principles work whether or not Scottoiler's own oil is being used; if not using Scottoiler's own oil, the trick aiui is finding another that works as well.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Hi Fledging, From factory 鈥71 had 19t front & 106 links. If you have 106 you can use various brands. Problem with 107 is the 1/2 link is hard to come by from many brands. They might make them, but not stocked.

If original chain is still really good, no rust, I鈥檇 consider reusing it. Original Renold was very high quality chain.

I鈥檇 install wheel & trial fit chain. Then you鈥檒l know how many links is best.
Count the pins including master link.

These bikes don鈥檛 make much power. Very rare for chain to just fracture. Master link coming off is what usually happens. A proper fitting & fitted clip is a must. Clip must face in correct direction. Clip on backwards or not all the way on, it will come off. I鈥檝e put on many chains. Hundreds. Never had clip come off yet, as I triple verify it鈥檚 facing right way & fully seated.
Don
 

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Excellent.

You aren't doing it off the tyres, which some do, and bothers me. I'll give it a go when I've time.

How though do you measure off from the front wheel, keeping it properly aligned, not pointing slightly to one side?
I run the laser from the front wheel to the back tyre first to position the front wheel where it needs to be first but the bars can be off centre by as much as an half inch without it making too much of a difference to the final outcome. I鈥檝e a different set of lines for each bike and when the dot disappears inside the line that鈥檚 as good as it gets, and the good thing is when you鈥檝e marked an accurate line you only need to use it on one side of the bike.

If there鈥檚 a ripple in the rim it can make a very slight difference so I always position the valve up at the top for repeatable results.
 

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Even when running a chain on my, God forbid, Harley with the 124 and 130+ rear wheel hp. I was getting 16,000 miles per chain and the sprockets would last 32,000 miles. Proper care and lube you get to run a long time. That chain is a bit better being an O ring chain that we can run on the Vintage Triumph but then we aren't putting that type of power through the chain either.
 

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StuartMac said:
Repeat Peg's advice to any high-mileage triple owner ... if you want to cause great hilarity; however, note the extended index fingers being rotated in circles beside temples ... :cool:
Hi Fleg
The smile at the end of the paragraph indicates Stuart is being playful with me.

However it does give me the opportunity to disagree, and to keep it fun - I will do it StuartMac cut and paste style馃槉

Triumph and BSA triples, which make far more power as standard than any of the makers' twins, were made for eight years, all were fitted new with split-link final-drive chains, they were sold all over the world -
Big singles eat chains, twins were hard on them, triples were reasonable with them, fours treated them like princesses.
It鈥檚 the power pulses not the outright power that kills them prematurely.
Last week I replaced the chain/sprockets on my toy bike 200cc Suzuki RV after 2,100 miles, even the poor quality factory non sealed chain was riveted link. The replacement DiD 520VX3 X-Ring chain recommended for all of that arm ripping 16bhp can also be used on modern four cylinder motorcycles up to 800cc.

It is easy to fool yourself that because our bikes are old, they won鈥檛 break a chain. In reality bikes hardly ever break chains, it is the clip becoming dislodged that is the reason most chains fail. Out bikes have so little clearance I suspect they are more likely to dislodge the clip. Favourite is a bent in chain guard from a clumsy pillion boot. You back the bike up to park it, the clip catches on the chainguard in the direction you don鈥檛 want it to. Clip is ready to come off next time you ride forward.

Between 1968 to 76, I suspect there was no such thing as a riveted joining link, they were available after the Meriden factory closed sometime in the 1980鈥檚 or 90鈥檚. In those days the 鈥榬iveting kit鈥 was 拢400-拢500 and you had to have your chain professionally fitted, now the riveting kits are 拢20.


far-and-away the most in the most litigious country in the world (USA). There is not a single recorded case of the US importer being sued even unsuccessfully for a broken split-link chain.
Iack of litigation does not prove anything.

These old heaps, good-quality final-drive chain well-maintained, ime far more likely than a broken split-link is a rear-wheel puncture;
Lots of preconditions that are not necessarily the case in the real world, "good quality", "well maintained" and a non relevant comparison, it鈥檚 split link Vs Riveted link chain joiner, not split link Vs tyre, or headlamp bulb, or battery or anything else.

rivetted link chain, total, complete, utter pita. Been there, done that, wiped my hands on the t-shirt and threw it away.
"rivetted link chain, total, complete, utter pita." 100% agree on that-but modern tools and familiarity make it easier now for home replacement.
But importantly you are still trading 鈥榖est practice鈥 for convenience; easy removal for ultimate safety.

In the end you need weigh the risks and make your choice.

regards
Peg.

Oh, and a quick word from our sponsors, found on the back of my new chain box:馃槉

Font Screenshot Publication


鈥斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺斺-
I nearly forgot Scottoiler company have now developed a biodegradable chain oil馃憤馃徎馃槏
拢13 for 250ml app:5000 miles use
 
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