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I have almost 15,000 miles on my bike (after 11 months!) and the front tire still looks ok. I replaced the rear tire at 11 or 12,000 miles. How many miles are you guys getting out of the front tires?

This is a Metzler tire.
 

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I have 13160 miles on both original tires and they still look pretty much like new. I would have preferred a stickier compound. I just replaced my first set of brake pads last week at 13000 miles. Vegas :)
 

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Installed a pair of Dunlop 501's at 6500 miles this past May. Replaced the rear at 12500, as tread was thin. Front still has ok center tread at nearly 16000, but is cupping on the sides, causing slight vibes in turns. Time to replace it.

Bob
 

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I changed both just shy of 12,000. They were both well into the wear bars, but still had grooves to channel water.

Around 8000 miles, the rear began slipping in turns. 1000 miles or so later, the front started pushing in curves, so this took some fun out of my weekend riding. But the tires looked fine so I kept riding them until they thinned out.

I ride a lot on central Texas secondary roads, which tend to have rougher surfaces, so I know this is pretty hard on the tires.

Went with the Lasertecs this time. Not sure yet how much difference there is, but it sure put the fun back into running the twisties.
 

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I always change my tire's in set's. The front one wore out at 6000 mile's so I replaced both of them even though the rear was still good. I don't like to mix compounds or styles of tire's. I went with a sport touring tire which has a harder compound in the center and a softer compound on the sides. When I go into a drift they both slide at the same rate and point of lean. :cool:
 

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Bryan posted:::::::I always change my tire's in set's. The front one wore out at 6000 mile's

Someone else said they had 13,000 on their tires and they still look like new. And this person lives in Vegas where they must do a lot of riding on super hot surfaces. What's up with this? Regardless of riding styles (well, w/i reason) and make of tire I find it very confusing as to why there is such a great difference in how tires wear out.

CC
 

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I completely agree with you Daz. The best time to change motorcyle tires is when there is still plenty of tread left on ithem. And change them in sets.

$350 every year is small price for a little extra insurance against losing it in a rainstorm, in a corner, or in an emergency stop and totaling the bike and possibly yourself. Just MHO.

I got about 7K out of my Metzlers. Stuck with them on the replacement as they are a great sticky tire and pretty good in the wet. When you put on a new set of tires, you really realize what you are missing if you are riding on worn, out of round tires. The turn in on curves is just so much quicker and sharp. It's a big enhancement to the riding experience.

-Chuck-

On 2006-11-23 09:57, Bryan wrote:
I always change my tire's in set's. The front one wore out at 6000 mile's so I replaced both of them even though the rear was still good. I don't like to mix compounds or styles of tire's. I went with a sport touring tire which has a harder compound in the center and a softer compound on the sides. When I go into a drift they both slide at the same rate and point of lean. :cool:
[ This message was edited by: ChuckofTahoe on 2006-11-23 11:21 ]
 

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I bought my Thruxton used with only about 2,500 miles on the stock Metzlers. The bike (and thus tires) were almost two years old. Almost immediately I noticed a moderate low-speed front end wobble, but at first did not think it was caused by the tires. The tires looked good to the naked eye. The wobble progressively got worse, turned into a mid-speed wobble (while on a 3,000 trip). I changed tire pressure w/o significant improvement. A buddy suggested that I slowly run my hand over the tire and sure enough, I could detect a slight undulation.
So with plently of visible rubber still on the stock front tire at about 8,000 miles I switched to Sport Demons (recommended by numerous Thruxton owners on TriumphRat).
So don't always believe what you see.
Happy Thanksgiving,
Shep
 

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OEM Bridgestones are at 4000 miles and looks half done. I am thinking of going to sport compund Avons just for the increased handling capacity.
 

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I agree with that. There can be plenty of tread but if you do a lot of highway miles your tires will be out of round after a while. The handling will not be as secure or as fun as you tip back and forth over the "edge" in the tire when cornering

On 2006-11-23 11:25, milsherut wrote:

So don't always believe what you see.
 

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On 2006-11-23 11:11, ChuckofTahoe wrote:
I completely agree with you Daz. The best time to change motorcyle tires is when there is still plenty of tread left on ithem. And change them in sets.
I got 9,200 miles out of my OEM Bridgestones. The back was getting out of round from running the Interstate commuting to work. I also believe in replacing them in sets -- everything gets scrubbed in at the same time, no worries later on. I agree with Chuck, it's cheap insurance.

Jonathan
 

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I got 5k miles out of the OEM Bridgestones on my '03 T-100. I got 7K miles out of the Pirelli Sport Demons, and it looks like my current set of Pirelli Sport Demons will require replacing at 7K miles.

Bryan, It looks like chuck gave you have a new nickname--"Daz". :-D

Larry
 

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On 2006-11-23 10:56, PA-guy wrote:
What's up with this? Regardless of riding styles (well, w/i reason) and make of tire I find it very confusing as to why there is such a great difference in how tires wear out.
Of course tire compound is king. But speaking to similar/same tires, I'm convinced this is what type road surface miles are built on, how abusive the riding style, and how well tire pressure is monitored.
 

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I got around 8K on my rear Bridgestone and 12K on the front. I could have push the front to 13K or so, but I was about to take a trip and didn't want to risk it. I replaced them with the same Bridgestones.
 

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The front stock Bridgestone has got 17,000+ miles on it.
There is still plenty of tread left, it is starting to cup a little.
The rear I changed at 12,000 and replaced it with
another Bridgestone.
Bill
 

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My Bonnie is handling funny. Can't quite put my fimger on it. It may just be the rear Metz radial getting flat in the middle. But it seems like more than that. It appears the rear Metz is a radial & the front is a bias ply tire. That is exactly the feeling I am getting. When radial car tires first started coming out on the market, the worse thing you could do was have radials on one end of a car & bias plys on the other. I actually did that on my 57 Chevy. It was awful. That is the way my bike feels. The back end will change lines while the front doesn't. Very bad feeling. The front Metzler looks brand new at 7200 miles & the back is just starting to wear flat. Maybe 20% gone on the rear. The Haynes Manual says the T100 front tire is supposed to be a 100/90-19. The rear 130/80-17. My rear tire is a 130/80-R17. The "R" means radial. My local cycle shop also said they shouldn't be mixed. The last 2 bikes I had I put on Kendas rated at 130 MPH. They were great. I may go with them on Bonnie soon. With new tubes of course.
 

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English spanner, while I can not post pictures of the tires in question (do not have the camera or knowledge to do so), I did mic the tread depth of the tires for ya. I miked the unused tread depth on the side wall of each tire, and the center tread depth remaining. The front tire has lost one millimeter of the 3.75 millimeters of the original tread. The rear tire has lost 1.52mm of the original 7.23mm of tread. So I have used about one forth of the front tires tread, and about one fifth of the rear tires tread. You will have to assume I know how to use a micrometer (been using it to reload ammo for my guns for nearly twenty years now without a mishap). The Bridgestones must have a very hard compound. I am a very conservative rider as you can see, otherwise I would have given up on these low performance tires long ago and purchased something with a much softer compound.I was not bragging when we spoke of our tires mileage, as I do not consider long mileage an asset when we start talking about the mileage we get on our motorcycles tires. By the way ES, you sure have a funny way of spelling tyres in your country. Come to think about it your automobile steering wheels are on the wrong side as well. So how do you get a right hand side drive on your motorcycles? :razz: Vegas
 
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