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I was just looking online and see a lot of different answers but nothing really concrete.
What's your practice or experience, and is it just because that's how you do it or scientific reasoning behind it

When you ride do you always press the clutch in all the way when shifting/ down shifting? Or just halfway to where you feel/know its grabbing.
 

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I just sort of pull a little bit until I feel it is out and shift quickly. I set the proper freeplay per the manual and lever distance to what is comfortable and allows me to shift quickly. If I am out for a more relaxed ride I pull it in a bit further. Not sure what the actual travel distance is though.
 

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Here's my shot at your question. I'll leave it to others to provide the scientific explanations.

Shifting, and the amount you pull in the clutch, will vary depending on the engine and gearbox in the bike. For example, when upshifting on my K1200S (4 cylinders, high revving) the effects of engine compression were minimal for shifting. I'm pretty sure BMW sold the K12 gearbox to tractor manufacturers for extra revenue because the things were clunky as hell. This meant for smooth shifting I would pre-load the shifter (put pressure with my toe on the shift lever) and then simply flick (very quick, short pull) the clutch to shift. Or, pre-load with a little more pressure and cut the throttle quickly and the gearbox would slip into the next gear with NO clutch. The clutch flick tended to be smoother.

When downshifting the clutch comes most, or all, the way in because I always match revs with a throttle blip when dropping a gear. Rev matching is more important on 2 and 3 cylinder engines because of the compression braking you will experience if you don't do it.

On Speedy, I don't have to be so meticulous with my shifting technique. Then again, I have the 2012 S3R, which has the updated transmission. In fact, this is one of the primary reasons I went with this model. Years of dealing with the K12 gearbox wore out my left leg. I can be a bit more lazy with my shifting on Speedy on the upshift. I seems to come down as much to the timing of the throttle roll off and on, as it does how much I pull in the clutch.

I pay as much or more attention to downshifting on Speedy because of the greater engine braking as compared to the K12. So the clutch comes most or all the way in, and there is more travel in the throttle twist. But it all happens very quickly.

Thus, you can preload your shifter and flick the clutch when you cut the throttle, and the next gear will click in. Or, you can preload the shifter more and cut the throttle with NO clutch, and the next gear will click in. Or, you can be more lazy about it and use more clutch. A lot depends on how you are riding (aggressively or not) and the timing between the shifter, throttle, and clutch.

Try all the techniques. Its fun to learn how your bike will handle using each of them.
 

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I was just looking online and see a lot of different answers but nothing really concrete.
What's your practice or experience, and is it just because that's how you do it or scientific reasoning behind it

When you ride do you always press the clutch in all the way when shifting/ down shifting? Or just halfway to where you feel/know its grabbing.
I'm sorry to be pedantic Sen, or even sound facetious, but one doesn't "press" one's cutch on motorcycles, one pulls one's clutch...
 

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Don't bother on the up shift, not needed on motorbikes unless you're riding an old dinosaur or a Harley (thought thats the same thing really isnt it). Only tried clutchless upshift once on the Harley lol.

Down shift as much as needed, if you put a bit of pressure on the shifter the bike will shift itself as such when its ready.
 

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I'm sorry to be pedantic Sen, or even sound facetious, but one doesn't "press" one's cutch on motorcycles, one pulls one's clutch...

1) I had to look up Pedantic - paraphrase the dictionary here - the act of being a dick on details for no apparent reason. I guess looking up the definition of Pedantic makes me Pedantic as well and all the glory that arrives with that honor.

2) He is absolutely right. You pull in the clutch on a motorcycle.

3) You need only to pull in the clutch to the extent that you can easily shift gears. Others do not use a clutch for upshifting but I am always afraid of abusing the gear box, right or wrong, so I do not do this.Rev matching is an excellent idea and works well with the Trip, agree on this.

4) Of course if you personally press your Trips clutch by somehow twisting your foot around and stepping down on the lever due to a physical limitation or grave deforming injury preventing the use of your hand we all apologize to you up front.
 

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I disagree, if you are sitting on the bike backwards (via the front fender) and have no clue what you are doing, then you PRESS the clutch in with your right hand......

the point at which the clutch starts grabing from fully pulled in (at the handgrip) on start off is where the clutch engages; so it makes sense to pull it in (to the engagement point) at least as much when upshifting or downshifting.

Some bikes don't engage until the last inch of travel and some bikes (like our Triumphs) grab 1 inch from the bar (thats my preference)

I dont use the clutch ALL the time but when I do, I never felt the need to even bother measuring how much to pull it in. It's done so fast and smoothly why even bother to measure, just pull it????
If you dont pull it in enough (almost impossible on upshift) then it will bang into gear horribly during downshift and snap the dogs and you will be at fault for the repair and lose your riding privilages forever......Triumph will lable you a bad rider and never allow you to participate in their warranty program again. .....lol!
 
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