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2018 Bonneville T120, Red/Silver
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize for yet another tire thread, but I'm a bit of a newbie so here goes...

I bought a used 2007 Bonnie (spoke wheels) a few years ago. The original owner had just put on a 130/90-17 Shinko-10 tubeless-tire on the rear, and left me a new Shinko-10 100/90-19 for the front which I put on last year. The rear needs replacing now. I note that the stock tire for a 2007 is a 130/80-R17 tubed-tire.

1) If I replace the rear with a 130/80 instead of the 130/90 that's there now, how will it affect my ride? I'm just wondering why he went up a size, and if it really matters other than looks.

2) If I put on the Triumph-recommended Bridgestone or Metzler, will it matter that I have a (fairly new) Shinko on the front? I.e., is it recommended to keep front and rear tires the same style/brand?

The Shinko's are tubeless tires, and I have to say that when I replaced the front tire it was a bitch getting the last tire off the rim (also a tubeless). So since I'm planning on changing the tires myself, I was thinking to go with a tubed-tire just to make the job easier... So:

3) Is it true that a tire designed for tubes (and designated as such) will be easier to put on/ take off -- i.e., easier to break the bead?

4) And will I notice any difference in handling with a tubed tire on the rear versus a tubeless tire?

Thanks for any answers to my dumb questions...

-Dan
 

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WOW.

If you have spokes on stock rims, you already HAVE tubes. BTW, most tubeless motorcycle tires can be run with tubes.

As for "ride", will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer and the high-tech radials I'm running were an improvement in handling vs the bias Sport Demons I had been running. Unfortunately, the "ride" is much harsher. Everything is a compromise. The Sport Attacks were obviously made for a more modern bike with better suspension. The Sport Demons had very good "ride"; they just don't last long.

IMO Triumph knew what they were doing when they fit a bias front tire on a spoked Bonneville.
 

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If you replace the 130X90 rear tire with a 130X80 you will notice a couple hundred RPM increase at road speed and better all round throttle response also.
 

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2018 Bonneville T120, Red/Silver
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
@iambroving - yes I know I have tubes. Fortunately I'm not THAT much of a newb! :). But the PO put tubeless tires on (with tubes of course else all the air would leak out of the spoke holes). So I have a choice of replacing with either tubeless or tubed tires (both with tubes of course). I thought I read that tubeless tires have a much stiffer bead, and so are harder to remove, no? And are maybe heavier than tires designed for spoked wheels w tubes thus having more unsprung weight and perhaps stiffer sidewalls? So I was wondering if there is a handling difference between the two given that they are built differently.

-Dan
 

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I thought I read that tubeless tires have a much stiffer bead, and so are harder to remove, no? And are maybe heavier than tires designed for spoked wheels w tubes thus having more unsprung weight and perhaps stiffer sidewalls? So I was wondering if there is a handling difference between the two given that they are built differently.

-Dan
Life isn't quite that simple. Sidewall stiffness varies a ton between manufacturers, tubed or tubeless, so no such generalization is possible.

Yes, there will be a handling difference based on sidewall stiffness, radial vs bias, etc., etc... The radials I'm running are sharper steering due to less sidewall flex but the ride is worse as they transmit every road irregularity whereas the bias Demons absorbed a ton of harshness. Compromises...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Life isn't quite that simple. Sidewall stiffness varies a ton between manufacturers, tubed or tubeless, so no such generalization is possible.

Yes, there will be a handling difference based on sidewall stiffness, radial vs bias, etc., etc... The radials I'm running are sharper steering due to less sidewall flex but the ride is worse as they transmit every road irregularity whereas the bias Demons absorbed a ton of harshness. Compromises...
Makes sense. Thanks for the info!

-Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Okay, not to beat a dead horse here, but now I'm wondering WHY manufacturers still offer "TubeType" tires, since a) you can put a tube inside a tubeless tire and use it on your spoked rims, and b) no manufacturer wants to have more SKU's then they need to -- it's expensive in shelf space and logistics.

For example, looking on BikeBandit I see that Bridgestone offers their Battleax BT45 in BOTH a Tubeless and Tubetype version:

100/90-19 57H is the Tube Type for $163 list price
100/90-19 57V is the Tubeless for $186 list price

Same model tire, same manufacturer. What's the difference between the two??? There must be a reason...

-Dan
 

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in your example the speed ratings are different, and the tubetype is cheaper ... but that's not always the case.

if you fit tubeless with a tube you are over engineering, it probably works OK but you are not utilising the tubeless capability.

my handbook tells me if fitting tubeless with a tube there should be a sidewall marking eg. 'on tube type rim fit a tube', presumably not all tubeless are suitable for a tube??? However I don't recall ever seeing that caption, and I know tubeless is routinely fitted to tubetype rims.

if I had tubetype rims I'd want tubetype tires, so presumably they're made for riders like me ... except I prefer tubeless and avoid tubetype & tubes anyway!
 

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The previous owner used a 130/90-17 Shinko because it is a much less expensive tire that works very well in as close a size to original as possible.
There will not be enough difference in the sizes to be noticable.
It is not easy to get any type tire off the rim because the rim is designed to hold the tire in place.
It is commenly thought that tire type (bias, radial) should not be mixed, but Triumph has outfitted the Bonneville that way from the factory with no ill affects.
I use Shinko tires myself on my 07 Bonneville and they perform fine.
 

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I also use 130/90 Shinko 712 on the rear, drops the revs a couple of hundred rpm at cruising speed.
They perform fine for my usage and wear well, dosn't flatten off in the middle like most tyres do on the long straight roads I ride on and grip pretty well once warm.

Plus like me they're cheap.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just to close out this thread -- this weekend I ended up putting an Avon Roadrider Tubeless on the back, in the standard 130/80 size. So far I like it, seems very firm and planted. And even though it's theoretically smaller in diameter than the 130/90 Shinko that was on there, it actually feels taller. I'm thinking that the Shinko was so worn out that the sidewalls were starting to get soft/squishy. (Does that make any sense? Or maybe they were just always that way?) In any case, I'm happy. Breaking the bead was a bitch as usual, but I did the trick with the 8-foot 2x4 for leverage and it actually didn't take that long. After replacing it, I noticed that the front tire has hit the wear marks, so I get to replace that one next weekend, oh joy! I'll go with the Roadriders up front too, just for consistency.

Thanks everyone for the info.

-Dan
 
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