Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of September's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Read Only
Joined
·
296 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Changed the front and rear brake pads this morning. Front went in no probs, 15 min job. Rear came apart ok but upon compressing the pistons to re fit the pads and slip it on the disc I realised one of the pistons was well and truly stuck. Looks like a rebuild is on the cards soon. Managed to force the caliper back on for the time being but need to find some time and a warm(ish) dry place this week to do the rebuild. Its my own fault for letting my strict maintainance regime slip since I haven't got a garage any more. :mad:

A lesson to us all I guess.

Wayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
Bigred's problem raises a question that I'm not sure how to deal with. I've replaced pads in cars, trucks and motorcycles and have sooner or later had to deal with a seized caliper. So, I've just made it policy to replace the caliper with rebuilt units when I do the pads. Doesn't cost that much, and so far no seized up brakes.

I doubt that this is possible with the Triumph (well, anything is possible if you throw enough money at it!!). So, what do others do to make sure your calipers don't seize? Both when you replace pads just for general maintenance? The TBS only has 5000km on her, but sooner or later I'll have to deal with it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
just rebuild if they sieze. Its an easy job and they dont sieze as badly as cars generally.

I think Sprint manufacturing may do rebuilt calipers, they certainly do cheap seal kits.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
991 Posts
A caliper seizes because of contamination. Water gets in to the system and ends up at the bottom of the caliper piston bore. If it sits there long enough it starts to corrode the metal and you end up with metal rust bits and a rough surface on the piston/piston bore and then the piston seizes.

To help prevent this from happening you need to flush the system from time to time, and if you really want go the extra mile pop the pistons out clean and install new seals before the contamination damages the piston/piston bore.


.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
I think bigread already knows the reasons that pistons can stick but for the benefit of everybody else...
<BR>
<BR>The other reason that the pistons tend to stick is more common - as the pads wear the piston is exposed and gets covered in brake dust, mud and salt (if you ride year round) this crud builds up and can stop the piston retracting on its own, but it also promotes corrosion of the piston. YOu can help allievate this problem by keeping the bike clean and removing and cleaning out the caliper every now and again.

[ This message was edited by: MickMaguire on 2007-01-23 08:03 ]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,646 Posts
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top