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Discussion Starter #1
Tomorrow marks the 70th celebration of Veteran's Day here in the US (add 19 years celebrated as "Armistice Day" it reaches back 89 years.) We have many soldiers deployed in the middle-east and elsewhere fighting to protect our homes, our citizens and the lives of those who have suffered at the hands of our enemies. Regardless of how you feel about the war(s) politically, we owe these brave man and women a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid by any conventional means. It is perhaps equally as important as Memorial Day as it includes all veterans, living and dead who have sacrificed to preserve our security and peace.

Take a moment to send a note, an email, a care package to those far from home to remind them they are appreciated, missed and loved by those of us who remain home and enjoying the security within our shores. Remember those who fought in previous conflicts. Remember those who have returned home, with serious or crippling injuries and face long struggles to regain their former lives.

There is no room for partisanship when it comes to honoring those who would willingly sacrifice everything to defend even those who would disagree with them.

There are several veterans on this forum. Both American and foreign. I humbly offer my greatest gratitude for your service to your country and the peace of the world.

:welldone::notworthy:
 

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:goodpost:

I agree. There are a lot of vets on here (myself included) who are lucky enough to now lead happy and peaceful lives, because of the constant sacrifice of others.

We are indebted to them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree Denman;

but one little point! Not American and foreign. American, British, Canadian, Australian, New Zealander, even Welsh! And maybe a ghurka or two.
Point taken. I was simply referring to an American holiday that should include the gratitude for veterans of our allies as well. So that includes all you have mentioned and likely several more. I think we're all on the same page here.

:beerchug:
 

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"On November 11, 1921, an unknown American soldier from World War I was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, in recognition of WWI veterans and in conjunction with the timing of cessation of hostilities at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). President Warren Harding requested that: "All ... citizens ... indulge in a period of silent thanks to God for these ... valorous lives and of supplication for His Divine mercy ... on our beloved country." Inscribed on the Tomb are the words: "Here lies in honored glory an American soldier know but to God." The day became known as "Armistice Day." In 1954, Congress, wanting to recognize the sacrifice of veterans since WWI, proposed to change Armistice Day to Veterans Day in their honor. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, former Supreme Commander in WWII, signed the legislation.

To honor those veterans who sacrificed all, an Army honor guard from the 3d U.S. Infantry (The Old Guard) keeps day and night vigil at Arlington. At 11 a.m. Tuesday, a combined color guard representing all military service branches executes "Present Arms" at the tomb for the laying of a wreath by the president, followed by "Taps."

More than a million Patriots stand ready, or are actively defending our nation today. These men and women were not drafted into service, but volunteered to serve."

from http://patriotpost.us/. And I warn you Kevo, denman, that site will give you hives. Randy, Captscottreeh, you'll love it.

May God bless all the veterans who have served in defense of freedom.
 

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My apologies Denman I thouight you knew:

November 11 is Remembrance Day in Canada and many other Commonwealth countries, including Australia.

It's a national hioliday in Canada.

There is a service at 11am broadcast throughout the country, with the head of state, the prime minister and members of the government, and 2 minutes of silence followed by the Last Post.

All throughout Canada there will be local services and wreath laying ceremonies.

In the UK Nov 11 used to be Remembrance Day, but it's now observed on the nearest Sunday.

It's also celebrated as Armistice day in New Zealand France and Belgium, and Independance Day in Poland.

For the last few weeks in Canada people have been buying poppies for their lapels. The money goes to the Veterans association - The Royal Canadian Legion. They wear the poppies as a symbol of the sacrifice of war, in all Canada's wars, up to and including Afghanistan.

 

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Yes it is Rememberance day in Canada in about an hour.

My son is a scout and for his Rememberance Day ceremony at school he was one of the wreath bearers and this was his second year doing it. He takes it real seriously and I am blessed with boys who are learning about what their great grandfathers sacrificed.

Thank you to all the vets out there who paved the way to our current freedoms.

Lest we forget.
 

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Wwi & Ww2

A few months ago I visited some of the old battlefields of WW1 France and can hardly describe the emotions it left in me. There is not too much to look out nowadays, plowed fields and little forgotten villages, mostly. While I spent most of my time at the Somme sites where the Aussies fought, it is impossible to travel a few miles without stumbling across memorials for the dead from a dozen countries. Even the Chinese laborers that both sides employed to dig trenches and risk their lives in a thousand mundane tasks have their own cemetery and memorial.

A visit to the US cemetery above Omaha Beach will sadden and amaze the viewer. So many headstones, farking thousands and thousands of them... So many dead boys. My girlfriend, who is an Aussie, not a Yank, broke down sobbing at the sight of it. Pitiful waste of life...

And I defy anybody to stand on Omaha Beach itself, take in the cliffs with all the German defenses and machine gun emplacements and not wonder how those American, Canadian and British kids did it? They must have rocks the size of bowling balls. So many thousands never even touched the sand alive. I seriously doubt that I would have been able to do it, yet I am a vet myself... The first day I visited Omaha Beach it was storming in the same way it must have been during the invasion on June 6 1944. The Channel was raging and the rain was flying sideways, stinging the eyes and making things impossible to see. I just dunno how they did it?

Oh, one last thing. The French people I met on my journey really do appreciate the American sacrifice.
 

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Sometimes we in the Anglo world belittle the French, but in WWI they suffered 1,397,800 military deaths, 300,000 civilian deaths and 4,266,000 military wounded.

We remember them too, and all the boys and young men from all over the world who never grew old.

French War Grave at Ypres

 

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Discussion Starter #13
My apologies Denman I thouight you knew:

November 11 is Remembrance Day in Canada and many other Commonwealth countries, including Australia.

It's a national hioliday in Canada.



Actually, I should have known that. I am second generation American of Irish decent. My great-grandfather emigrated from Ireland to Canada where my grandfather was born. My grandfather and his brothers fought in the trenches in Belgium and France during WWI in the Canadian Infantry. His brother, my great uncle, Emmerson was killed in Europe. His name is listed in the registry at the Scottish National War Memorial in Edinburgh. I imagine he must be listed in a Canadian Memorial too but I have never seen it.

I think the poppies are a splendid touch.
 

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Well I am English by birth and now it says American on my passport - so I know the day both from England and the stories of ancestors who fought at Ypres and various locales during WWII as "Remembrance Day" and from recent times and friends here who have served in the Gulf and Afganistan as "Veterans Day" - and I say a heartfelt thanks to ALL who bravely served their countries and freedom, no matter what their nationality or time period of serving; we owe you all a great debt for the lives we can enjoy because of your giving and sacrifices made; so respect and heartfelt thanks to you all, past and present, we shall never forget.
 

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There is no room for partisanship when it comes to honoring those who would willingly sacrifice everything to defend even those who would disagree with them.


:welldone::notworthy:
Sorry to introduce a sour note. Recently the city of Belfast hosted a parade to welcome home and thank troops who had been serving in Afghanistan, Sinn Fein held a protest at the same time calling this parade 'provocative'
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Very sorry to hear about those kinds of things but let's keep this thread about honoring our troops and those supporting them in a positive light. We could go on all day about what's wrong with certain groups or affiliations and the questionable stands and actions they take. It would be like having a debate at the presidential inauguration. :eek:
 

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Lest we forget.

Those who forfeited their life or their innocence for a flag or for a belief must not be forgotten.
 
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