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Hey Everyone, This is my first triumph ( rebuilt a norton with my dad a few years back ) and I would love to get some input as to what I can do with the bike. Its a 73 T140 engine on a 72 tiger sport body.

For the most part i want to strip it down and make it something between a cafe racer and a "Brat"?! I dont know what to call it but basically stretch the rear swing arm by 1 3/4 inces or more and give it a bit of a longer look. I still do want to retain the classic look, just updated a bit!

I am ordering 60's side panels from steadfast cycles and probably some pancake filters to go with it. ( does anyone know which will fit best? offset? ) Also anyone know where to get full chrome ones?

As you can see I was able to find the old screw holes for the badges and the threads are in great condition.

Any Ideas on the following:
1. seat? something not so bulky?
2. Swing arm stretching advice?
3. Filter types?
4. Electrical covering ? plug wires?
5. Magneto? are they worth it?
6. handle bars ? ( i was thinking about 28'' drag bars? )
7. Exhaust? (best mufflers? Removing cross over pipe issues? )
If anyone has any great ideas or replies to my numbered questions please let me know!

Thanks very much in advance.

As of now I have striped it from this:


To this:






 

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Welcome. What's wrong with the bike? What's wrong with you? Have you done any research on chopped/altered bikes? What they are worth etc? You can do what you like, its your bike. Good luck not many do that sort of thing here.
 

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Welcome. What's wrong with the bike? What's wrong with you? Have you done any research on chopped/altered bikes? What they are worth etc? You can do what you like, its your bike. Good luck not many do that sort of thing here.
Haha! Good point! I definitely do not plan to mess with the frame other than the swing arm which at the rate people are bobbing out their bikes I can pick up a replacement for 20 bucks or so. I really plan to ride the bike lots and just wanted to get some tips on what I can do to "complete" the bike in a nice way.

Most Lots of the parts have been swapped from a few other bikes so im not attached to the half-stock parts really. I just want something a little bit more customized you know? Im young, and I want to ride! not just restore.

Thanks for the response! and I hear where you are coming from, my pops is a British "purist" too.
 

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I really plan to ride the bike lots and just wanted to get some tips on what I can do to "complete" the bike in a nice way.

Most Lots of the parts have been swapped from a few other bikes so im not attached to the half-stock parts really. I just want something a little bit more customized you know? Im young, and I want to ride! not just restore.
this is just my 2c

If you want to ride it my guess is you probably shouldn't think too much about mods like swing arm extensions, magnetos etc.

Customising it will probably end up introducing other complications that will require more time and money and thinking to sort out. That means you won't be riding it, rather you will be working on it.

If you want to ride it, keep it simple.

You don't have to 'restore it'. Just go for practical stuff to get it going and riding well.

Add electronic ignition if you aren't happy with points, not a magneto, some pancake filters or pods (or bell mouths). Do a simple (but tidy) rewire if it needs it. You can buy foam and shape the seat if you want lower profile.

Make sure the engine is well sorted.

The end result of having a well sorted ride-able bike in tidy condition will be the bike will almost certainly be worth more than if you have added 'your' style to it. You'll also probably spend less and ride it more.

Then again, if you are more interested in the look and don't like it as it is (or 'should be'), that is your call really. I don't see it as a particularly rare or special bike, it is already a bitsa. Thing is, you need to work out what look *you* want... you can ask people what they think looks good and you are going to get other people's taste not yours.

If you want it to keep value, don't make permanent stylistic changes to any of the major bits.
 

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Before stretching the swinging arm, why not have a go at slimming down the rear mudguard and light unit. Shorten the rear mudguard and look at smaller more compact modern light units/LEDs.
This should give the visual effect of a longer bike without all the hassle.
There was a recent thread on rear light units

Also have a good look round at pictures of other peoples bikes to get a good idea of the look you want (or don't want).

ps. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Before stretching the swinging arm, why not have a go at slimming down the rear mudguard and light unit. Shorten the rear mudguard and look at smaller more compact modern light units/LEDs.
This should give the visual effect of a longer bike without all the hassle.
There was a recent thread on rear light units

Also have a good look round at pictures of other peoples bikes to get a good idea of the look you want (or don't want).

ps. good luck.
Thanks man!

Thanks everyone for the input. I guess I just am really excited to get working on the bike, and while I know everyone has their own style I just wanted to put it out there to the world(aka the best group of triumph builders and riders out there!)s o you know what i am asking about later on as I am posting newbie questions:p.

Thats a great idea about the back end, and i was actually just reading that post on the rear tail light mods tonight.

I really am just looking for any pointers or "look out for"'s as I get going on the project. So yea, Thanks again everyone. I really just wanted some good input and ideas to kick around in my head that I might not have thought about..... It never hurts to ask, and it all about having fun doing it!

Thanks again!
J
 

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I agree with others that lengthening the swingarm is a "bad" idea, but you are looking at the right end of the bike. Old Brits tend to be oversprung and underdamped, making the chassis easy to upset over bumps. People tried a lot of things to overcome that back in the day, most commonly longer shocks set at a greater angle (i.e. moving the lower shock mounts rearward).

If you look at the swingarms on modern bikes, you will notice they are longer and have a definite downward angle that your swingarm lacks. Both have to do with handling greater engine power. Modern bikes can have longer swingrms without increasing the wheelbase because their transmissions have stacked shafts, thus making the engine shorter front to back. Your wheelbase is already fairly long, so if you lengthen the swingarm, the handling will become really slow and heavy.

On the other hand, if you are a good (really good) welder, you could modify the swingarm to give it a slight down angle. That would reduce squat under acceleration and allow you to use longer shocks. Then you could raise the tail and drop the forks in their clamps some to compensate. That would give the bike a more modern stance. Modern shocks are also a must to improve handling.

With bobbed fenders, clip-ons, and a different seat, it would then have an entirely different look. That is my $0.02.
 

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Never change the looks of a classic bike. It was damn near perfect from the start, thats why they are so popular and bring high dollar today.
Leave it stock, maybe upgrade the shocks.......and ride it.
Customizing a classic bike makes me just want to cry...........they should be on the protected species list.
 

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Modifying a classic bike like your proposing is a really bad idea in my opinion.
There was is a reason why they still bring high dollar, they looked absolutly fantastic and were great handling bikes for the day.
Upgrade the suspension with better high end shocks, add electronic ignition if you must, but otherwise plaease leave it unmolested.
Classiic bikes should be on the engangered species list...........and a crime to mutilate one.
 

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upgrades

Drag bars are intended for 1/4 mile rides. If you intend to ride for a couple of hours, I'd keep the ones on it now. http://www.northerneagle.ca/images/MC15-0040.jpg I'd go for offset pancake filters. Avoid Emgo exhaust pipes. Most others are heavier gauge and fit well. Ditto on the slower handling with an extended swing arm. Ride it first. Alter as needed. Bob
 

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Hey Everyone, This is my first triumph ( rebuilt a norton with my dad a few years back ) and I would love to get some input as to what I can do with the bike.


Welcome Jbones. You didn't mention how your bike runs. Personally I would try and get the bike running aces first. A well running classic Triumph "looks" better than any non-running custom bike IMHO.

There isn't anything on your list that you couldn't change back to what you have now so keep your enthusiasm for modifying. It's your bike. Some members just are looking out for your financial interest which is a smart move. I could change my bike back to it's original stock in about a week but I prefer it the way I modified it almost 40 years ago. I'm not selling it so I'm not worried about the value.

If you're ready to heavily modify your bike you may want to start a thread in the member's build section (above). You will find many members who are doing the same and enjoy imputting/sharing ideas as you have asked. I've accessed many great Triumph brains at this forum who will help you increase your options on a succesful build as some here on this post already have. Good luck.

P.S. Thanks for the pics but try more light. ;)






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Thanks triumpt120rv!

Yea the engine has been completely re built, Its runs incredibly! Thats why i am trying to make it a bit more customized on the outside. Your right, there is nothing i will do to the bike to make it imposible to return to "stock" for resale. I have all the parts I have took off and have documented as I have gone along.

I understand that there are people on here that are thinking about re-sale, but I bought this bike to ride and enjoy for the next half of my life, not for some investment purposes.

I do really appreciate the input of those that have pointed some good products out and appreciate all input.

And to Coroja, The info on the swing arm was great! I was taking alot of what I earned about streatching the arms from this old article from the 60's? here:

Definitely worth the read!






 

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Definitely worth the read!
It looks like it will be a great read. But it's the weekend and I haven't read that much in one sitting since I was in school! I'll get to it eventually though...;) Thanks for posting it.


I forgot to mention...There was a great looking bike that posted with pics about 3 or 4 months ago that put an extended swingarm on his Triumph (Bonneville ?). I can't remember the thread but you might get lucky with a search or someone else can remember and post the thread here. You may want to find it to get more info from him too in terms of ride etc. Good luck.




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Miss Gibson, my grade 12 English teacher would be proud that I read more than a couple of sentences on the weekend...


Jbones,

Are you sure you want to compromise handling around the bends and a light front end for smoother straightway stability? OIF (oil in frame) bikes are most famous for being the best handling of the classic bikes. Sounds to me like an odd trade off.









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Hey, Jbones, I have one of those extended swingarms I'll sell you [email protected]

Being that it's a not-at-all rare oil-in-frame model, and you've already stated you don't intend to chop the frame, I really don't understand a couple of folks reaction to your ideas.

Have fun with it, you can bolt-and-swap stuff till you get old and gray, and have 8 different bikes from the same frame & engine.
 

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Before stretching the swinging arm, why not have a go at slimming down the rear mudguard and light unit. Shorten the rear mudguard and look at smaller more compact modern light units/LEDs.
This should give the visual effect of a longer bike without all the hassle.
...and not compromise the excellent handling characteristics of your "oiler".

EDIT:- which I just noticed is a high seat model, must be an early '72 frame?
 

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Being that it's a not-at-all rare oil-in-frame model, and you've already stated you don't intend to chop the frame, I really don't understand a couple of folks reaction to your ideas.
They've got theirs to keep pristine for whatever reason, take this one and make it yours then ride it often :)
 
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