Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shortly after Triumph did my headstock tidy recall, I lost throttle control and the biKe went into limp mode. I did the repair myself as I could get no satisfaction from Triumph. About a year ago the data logging functions in my instrument set started periodically resetting, I just left that non critical problem. About 4 days ago my turn signals started going out intermittently. I just repaired the signals and the data logging functions yesterday and this morning.

I created this post for people who might not want to pay Triumph to fix a factory defect, but also might be unsure of cutting up their wiring harness. Hopefully this post will be helpful. Also I spend very little time on this website, but if anyone attempts to DIY around Triumph on this issue and would like my input, you might try emailing me. I might tell you what wires to suspect and pinout information, if you don't have it. It might just be me, but I don't think customers should need to pay Triumph big money to repair manufacturing defects.

Automotive lighting Automotive fuel system Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle brake


This picture shows initial disassembly with headlight removed. There are 3 red bullet connectors over on the right hand side back. Those are the connectors for my self cancelling turn signal system ST2. It's a good system. Pretty much all wires going around the head stock go through the light can or come out of the multi-pin gauge set connector. You can take any connection apart and ring out any wire with an ohm meter. Also most of these wire breaks start out as intermittent, so I always watch the symptom as I turn the handle bars lock to lock. It will normally come and go if it's a broken wire.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Automotive lighting


This shows the connector organizer plate and back of can removed, ready to remove the bottom of gauge cover.

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Motor vehicle Automotive tire


This shows the gauge connector unplugged.

Bicycle part Bicycle handlebar Electrical wiring Cable Carabiner


This shows the gauge harness untapped pulled out on the left side of the left fork for good access. In my hand are 3 violet wires. Apparently they supply continuous power to 3 data logging flash chips (this is all speculation as my manual treats this as a black box) for the stored data functions including clock. The single violet wire is continuous power from the fuse box, it should be spliced to the other 3, but it fell apart in my hand when I unwrapped the wire tape.

Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Wheel Bicycle tire


This picture shows a pin in the green and brown flasher pulse output of the gauge connector and an alligator clip on the green and brown flasher pulse wire at the head light can connector. I have a Haynes manual with a color wiring diagram that shows all these connectors including ECM pin out. It is essential for diagnose and tracking the problem. Base on the symptoms and the wiring diagram you can usually tell what wires are suspect. Additionally the ECM might have some codes that you can pickup with Tune ECM or a good code reader. I use my automotive tablet as its way easier to read than Tune ECM. I pretty much use Tune ECM to get rid of the maintenance wrench on the gauge set. For this repair I didn't need to pull the tank, I just pulled it back to make room for the repairs which were all happening between the gauge set and the light can. I'll discuss the throttle repair later.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive tire Automotive fuel system Automotive design


This is after wire mending. The yellow and red connectors are the repair of the 1 into 3 violet wire, and the green wire jumps around the broke green and brown. My wire tidy is still loose in this picture. The little blue at the top edge of the wire tidy is where the sharp edge of the wire tidy cut through the tape and started cutting the wire insulation after Triumph did the recall. I fitted a piece of edge protector over the sharp edge and glued it snug with liquid rubber insulation. I keep my wire tidy mount screws a little loose so that on full lock left the wires can easily flex it out to eliminate chaffing. I also moved the clutch cable to the inside. Amazingly, with all my changes, Triumph's P.O.S. wire tidy fix seems to be working. Neither of my failed wires were do to chaffing. It seems like they failed due to 10 LBS of sh** in a 5 lbs bag. I have 3 motorcycles in my little shop and going in and out I'm working lock to lock a lot. Of course it's no problem for the 2 Honda's that have adequate strain relief around the head stock, but the Triumph is a different story. In fact in the winter, when things get a little stiff, turning the Triumph from lock to lock sounds a little like opening the front door on a haunted house.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Vehicle


This shows everything going back together with the tidy in place. Here you can really see where Triumph's tidy install was cutting the wire dressing.

Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Vehicle Rim


This shot of the under seat shows where I installed a usb outlet extension cable that follows along the tank vent line under the tank and comes out at the head stock near my phone holder. This is also where I rang out the ECM wires years ago when I lost throttle control, when one of the 3 ground wires from the 6 wire group at the twist grip failed putting the bike into limp mode. I was able to ring out from the ecm connector to the light can connector exactly how I just did the flasher pulse wire. The ecm connector pinout is in my haynes manual immediately before the wiring diagrams.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Motorcycle Automotive fuel system


This shows to forward usb outlet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,385 Posts
... have 3 motorcycles in my little shop and going in and out I'm working lock to lock a lot. Of course it's no problem for the 2 Honda's that have adequate strain relief around the head stock, but the Triumph is a different story. In fact in the winter, when things get a little stiff, turning the Triumph from lock to lock sounds a little like opening the front door on a haunted house.
Thanks for posting. Always thought these harness problems attributed to too short, misrouted wiring (and possibly a combination of low cost wire, insulation, loom & termination vendor selections).

Poorly thought out cost-saving design and material money saving tricks (especially considering may be offputting in the future decision on buying another Triumph or whatever)?

If I were getting a new bike, think it'd be an old one ha-ha, but like both your choices - good luck on whichever you score and thanks again for the tips....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I say design. The wires are to short to provide adequate strain relief. Additionally the organizing tidy recall does not fix the problem. Most people need to do additional things to keep wires from chaffing after the recall is performed. I relocated the clutch cable, loosened the new plastic tidy organizer / provided edge guard over the sharp edge, and pulled all the slack I could out of the under tank wire way. I no longer have chaffing, but since I turn my handlebars lock to lock multiple times every time I use the bike (my shop is very tight), I still have had 3 wires break. I conclude the design is faulty and the recall does not fix the problem.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top