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Discussion Starter #1
I installed 6 pot Tokico calipers and the 5/8" Nissin master cylinder from a 2007 Hayabusa onto my 2002 Sprint RS. I re-used my stock brake lines, as the 'busa lines are rubber and the OEM Sprint lines are braided covered in plastic/rubber. I used the banjo bolts from the Tokicos as they had double exit holes compared to the Sprint's single and the entry holes at the bottom of the bolts were also larger.

The only modification to get them to work is you need to grind a tab off the master cylinder so the brake line can attach at the angle it wants to, and you have to rotate the throttle control cable housing slightly to fit with the 'busa's square, built in reservoir. (The stock reservoir is a cup on a perch style with a hose going into the master cylinder.)

Feel is rock solid compared to the stock Sprint's Nissin's. The stopping power was more than adequate on the stock brakes, but they were mushy feeling and you could almost pull the lever into your other fingers still wrapped around the throttle if you were braking hard. With the new setup, it has a very solid feel and lever pull is maybe an inch if that before it firms up and you can't pull it in any further. Didn't get to ride with them yet since it's been snowy and freezing here in MA, but I also want to throw fresh pads in before I set out, so it looks like there's plenty of time for that!
 

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welcome to the 6-pot club :) ...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Now that I've ridden with them for a bit, my favorite thing is the reduced lever travel and solid feel making throttle blips for downshifts while braking so much easier. Two fingers on the brake and two on the throttle and a little dexterity is all it takes. With the increased lever travel on the stock setup, sometimes my throttle finger knuckles would tap the back of the brake lever and disrupt the brakking a bit.
 

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Oddly, those that have the 6 pot Tokico's replaced them with 4 pot Nissan or Brembo for the exact same reason you described!
The Tokico 6 pot came on big ZX's & "busas.

Want some EBC HH pads w/95% life?
Also have caliper piston oil seals and dust seals, if you need 'em.
 

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I have a set on the 6 pot calipers I put on my st,
changed the rears as well.
they make the brakes work as they should have .
 

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I bought my Sprint 1050 ST ABS used and someone had already replaced the calipers with the 'Busa ones. I want to put the old ones back on but am dreading the ABS factor. Anyone done that? I called the local shop and they would do it for less than $150, so I was considering it, but just wanted to hear some thoughts.
 

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First thought: why bother? The 'busa calipers are probably slightly better than the stock ones and certainly no worse.

Second thought: Dealertool is only about $100, and will allow you to fully bleed your brakes whenever you want.

Third thought: As long as you're careful, you can swap calipers without worrying about the ABS at all. You'll just still have some old fluid in the system.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Having had the 6 pots and 4's on more than one race bike and one street bike (did the conversion briefly on my Daytona 1200, raced 2 TLRs) here is my take, fwiw

The reason people get better perceived performance when they swap is that they are putting a newly cleaned, maintained, and carefully installed brake system on their bikes; it has nothing to do with the actual intrinsic performance of the parts. It is my experienced opinion that the Nissin 6-pots are inferior for several reasons. The calipers are less rigid, the pads are hard to keep flat because they're so long, and they are more difficult to get properly bled (but this is minor tbh and most people don't notice).

I changed the calipers on my superbike-prepped (WERA, not AMA) TLR to GSXR 4 pots and enjoyed a vast improvement in consistency and feel due to the more rigid caliper body and the fact that I wasn't constantly battling warped pads. My supersport bike had to keep the 6-pots, and despite tireless work at keeping them at tip top shape in every way, they were always inferior to the 4 pot jobbers in feel. Power-wise they were fine until the pads warped, which on the race bike was about every 30 laps or so. Once that happened, the first part of your lever pressure was spent flattening the pads against the pistons instead of actually braking. Granted this is not a typical street riding concern, but it bears mentioning when discussing the conversion.

The point: if you are doing the swap because it's fun to do stuff to your bike, by all means go ahead. I don't mean that sarcastically either...it's fun to customize and personalize our bikes. I do stuff all the time of questionable value! If you're purely seeking improved performance, replace your m/c with an adjustable leverage ratio Brembo radial jobber, and comprehensively rebuild the calipers you have.
 

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Well having got a triumph trophy 1200 with the factory 4 pots on the front and a trident/sprint 900 that I fitted 6 pot tokicos on the front and all I can say it the sprint will outbrake the trophy any day of the week.

I ride both bikes hard and always get good feedback from the brakes. I do admit the 6 pots were a swine to bleed (back flushing the calipers works great) but they are excellent.
 

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Well having got a triumph trophy 1200 with the factory 4 pots on the front and a trident/sprint 900 that I fitted 6 pot tokicos on the front and all I can say it the sprint will outbrake the trophy any day of the week.

I ride both bikes hard and always get good feedback from the brakes. I do admit the 6 pots were a swine to bleed (back flushing the calipers works great) but they are excellent.
Ya they are a little better than that generation of 4-pot brakes (not much imo, with worse feel, but that's subjective). My post was addressing the folks with the newer generation 4-pots as on my 08 Sprint. I've used both setups extensively and it is my opinion that the TLR/Busa 6-pots are a tangible downgrade from the brakes my bike came with from the factory...which is to be expected, as they're 2 generations of Nissin brakes newer in design and manufacture.
 

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It surprises me, as a Busa owner, that this conversion is so popular, because I don't consider those brakes any better than mediocre on my Busa. Certainly not up to the speed it's capable of. I added HH pads and stainless lines just to make them acceptable for street use. Surely there is something better around?
 

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i can honestly say the only better brakes I have had on a bike were the setup I had on a Ex racing harley.

it had twin buell 340mm rotors and 6 pots up front.

I don't rate busa's highly. I know a neighbour had a limited edition white one and threw it down the road because he thought he could handle " fastest " No point having ultimate top speed when you can't throw it about and enjoy it.
 
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