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Discussion Starter #1
I just read a post where someone stated they’ve dumped a bike five times, and it got me wondering how often has this happened to others?

For me I’m 44 and have ridden street and dirt for 30 years and have hit the ground only twice on the street… dirt doesn’t count it’d be a book if it did.

First, I slipped on a residential street going supper slow on water; tires came right out from under me, landed in gutter water.

Secondly, I was coming out of a gated community and some joker was speeding on the wrong side of the road and pushed me over the curb into trees and bushes, not very fun.

My father said it's not a matter of if you dump it, it’s a matter of when you dump it. But riding safely you can control the number of times you actually dump.
To me five times seems excessive.
 

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Of course I've dumped my bike and yes, many, many times in the dirt. I lost it on snowpack (the bike slid under a parked car), on sand used for traction in snow (but the snow had melted and I slipped in the remaining sand), and on some extremely smooth concrete with a touch of water on it.

Is five times excessive? I don't think so. I think we all like to push the envelope occasionally. I don't ride on snow anymore (there isn't any here), but there are lots and lots of stupid cagers. It WILL happen again.
 

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Not while riding, but 9 years ago I was leaving my girlfriends house (wife now), and rolled my 1 week old GSXR out of her yard at 5 in the morning. Turned around to close the gate and for got to put down the stand.I woke the whole block up with my swear words.I learned from this, never be in a rush.
 

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...My father said it's not a matter of if you dump it, it’s a matter of when you dump it. But riding safely you can control the number of times you actually dump.
To me five times seems excessive.
I haven't crashed (dumped) in over 30 years but when I was younger I frequently crashed. How often you go down depends on how fast you ride and how far you push your limits. When I was a kid I often street raced for money and I seldom lost. You don't learn unless you crash. I stopped counting at 35... :rolleyes:
Many years ago I had a crashed helmet collection until my wife made me get rid of them. I kept 7 bashed and scraped helmets on a shelf above our back door and used them to remind me when going out on my motorcycle.
Helps you to remember to focus... ;)
 

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I'm 43, and going through the memory banks, twice for me (and since I have been street riding since I was 18, I consider myself pretty fortunate).

Once, in my first year, a low-speed putdown that cost me full range of my right shoulder (operation), and more recently, parked a friend's Road Glide on its crash bars (and me on the street) in downtown LA. I hit a substance not condusive to traction rounding a corner.

I accept responsibility on both counts, and fortunately man and machine were not dinged up too badly. It could certainly happen again, but I just do my part and enjoy riding way too much. :cool:
 

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Ramble59, I'm pretty sure it was my post you read.

I forgot to mention that the 4 on my Daytona 675 were a combination of street and track. 2 were from the street. The first was from a Silverado truck coming into my lane on a blind corner, making me run off the road and hitting a curve indicator and sending me flying over the handlebars and landing in an embankment. The second was hitting a patch of sand in a center turn-lane entering my work's parking lot.

I have a friend whose crashed so many times on the track...and he's a very good rider; that I'm at the point of not counting "track" crashes. So in comparison to other posters on this thread that say they wont count dirt crashes, I'll count track crashes in a different category as non-inclusive of "street" crashes.

So to calculate...3 "street" crashes. The two mentioned above, and the most recent.

The saying is definitely true that its a matter of "when" and not "if" I ride so much and rarely drive, so my chances are higher despite the gained experience. I'm just thankful that all crashes (track and street) have been injury free...and I owe it all thanks to my gear. I am a firm believer of ATGATT and my 5 crashes prove it.
 

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I've crashed plenty of times in the dirt...never on the street.
Heck..I'm 50 and haven't crashed a car either.
I don't buy that "whole its a matter of when" line. There's plenty of us who are on the road daily and have not crashed. Its a matter of being aware of your surroundings and riding within your capabilities.
 

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I reckon if you don't crash every now and agian you ain't riding fast enough.

Pete

Love it...reminds me of a quote from the movie Talladega Nights: "If you ain't first, you're last"
 

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It is possible never to crash. Still, most of us have dumped the bike a couple of times. Low speed dumps are part of the learning process and I agree with those who believe you can gauge a riders overall roadcraft by watching them in a parking lot. My two dumps were low speed during the first week I owned the bike. Both were due to poor throttle control and squezzing the front brake during a stall. The fortunate thing is that I was practically standing still when I dropped the bike and avoided both injury and damage to the bike. I learned a lesson, though. Learn the friction zone first.
 

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I've crashed plenty of times in the dirt...never on the street.
Heck..I'm 50 and haven't crashed a car either.
I don't buy that "whole its a matter of when" line. There's plenty of us who are on the road daily and have not crashed. Its a matter of being aware of your surroundings and riding within your capabilities.
Right... it has absolutely nothing to do with sharing the road with a bunch of idiotic cage drivers. Inconspicuous patches of oil, gravel, sand, ice or even wet leaves are never a factor. It's simply a matter of being aware of your surroundings and riding within your capabilities. Oh yea... and thinking that it won't ever happen to you makes you an even better rider. :rolleyes:
 

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my first year of riding didn't result in any dumps, but i did sort of drop it coming out of a driveway (stalled it with wheel turned, weight fell to the right).
however by some miracle, as it was slowly going past the point of no return (with me trying to keep it upright) it actually caught on the footpeg...which didn't retract. so it ended up using the footpeg as a side stand, and i had to hop off to lift it back upright. so luckily for me no damage.
 

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While riding on the back of my friends Kawasaki 750 ('76) we crashed into the side of a station wagon that pulled out in front of us. Residential area and after locking up the brakes we were probably only going about 15 mph when we hit. He got sandwiched between the bike and the car. I flew over the top and slid a long ways. We both walked away. He had some bad bruises and I had road rash just about everywhere.

My old CB450 came out from under me after hitting some gravel in the middle of an intersection ('78). No serious damage or injury.

Had a rapid air loss in the rear tire of the same bike ('79). Was moving along a state highway at about 55 mph. After losing control I somehow managed to come to a stop on the shoulder. Then I dropped the bike and was physically shaking for some time.

It was hard to get back onto a bike after that one. But I did and then sold the Honda in 1980 and didn't get on a bike again until 2007when I bought the Scrambler.

Was parked at work when it started to rain. Hopped on the Scrambler and drove around back to the shop. Shop floor is very smooth concrete. The Scrambler (with wet tires) hit that concrete and slid like it was on ice. No damage though (08).

While stopped at a stop sign on the Scrambler ('08) a pick-up making a left turn cut the corner (didn't see me at all until the last second) and all I could do was bail out to the right and drop the bike. He swerved at the last second but I had already bailed by then. Broke the brake lever and scratched the mirror housing.

I'm not sure there is much I could have done about any of these events. Maybe I could have been more aware of the gravel in the intersection and the smooth concrete. The other events were unpredictable.

I have to agree that if you haven't been down then the only way to keep your spotless record is to give up biking. Because if you don't then it's just a matter of time.

Ride safe,wear safety gear, and keep an eye on your tire wear and pressure.
 

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Right... it has absolutely nothing to do with sharing the road with a bunch of idiotic cage drivers. Inconspicuous patches of oil, gravel, sand, ice or even wet leaves are never a factor. It's simply a matter of being aware of your surroundings and riding within your capabilities. Oh yea... and thinking that it won't ever happen to you makes you an even better rider. :rolleyes:
Au contraire, my friend. Thinking that it can happen to you at any given time makes you a better rider. Knowing that anyone of those idiotic cage drivers could be a drunken, homicidal maniac thats out to kill you can make you better rider..and best yet, keeping your eyes on whats going on around you instead of looking for opportunities to give them a good roll at someone could..I dunno what that makes you..try it out and let us know.
 

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Back when I was young and on my first street bike - a brand spanking new 1980 Suzuki 750 GS - I thought I was God's gift to motorcycle riding. I pushed it, crashed three times, rebuilt the bike, slowed down and haven't repeated the experience since. Hope to not crash the Triumph, it's too pretty and I'm too old for that garbage anymore! ;)
 

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Often in the dirt and the woods. Twice on the road - both 30+ yrs ago. A little road rash the first time (mechanical failure) and just a bruised ego the second (my mental failure - too fast into turn, ran wide into a field).

I taught my son to ride a couple of years ago. The basic rules I tired to impart to him: (1) no one out there sees you. (2) they're all out to get you.
 

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Hi
I have been down plenty of times on the dirt, trail rideing. Only once the other day on the road. Some kid pulled out in front of me while i was doing about 40mph. I agree with the previous post. Ride like your invisible.
I recently read a book i think it was called Total control.
He also was big into wearing the right protection. I was the other night and always will, come rain and shine no matter how many miles i rack up. I think if you take the stance that you can always improve it keeps your guard up. No matter how much you ride, from 2,000 miles to 2,000,000 (xchopper?) We are all still learning.
All the best John
 

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Throughout my life I've had plenty of motorcycle falls; both on the street and in the dirt. Most could be categorized the same: a low speed, low side when encountering an unexpected slippery surface (oil, antifreeze, sand, leaves, etc). However, I had a fairly serious accident (read: ambulance ride) back in '05 that was a little different. While commuting to work and approaching a section where two lanes merged into one, someone ran to the front and jerked in front of everyone causing all to emergency brake. I was going about 55 mph and, though I had to hit the binders pretty hard, I was slowing down in complete control. Suddenly, the front end washed out and I fell with great force to the tarmac. It seems that as I braked, I transitioned from concrete to asphalt. Making things worse, as the transition took place there was a change in road camber and a slight dip. Despite an estimated speed of 40 mph, my front tire skid mark was only six feet long. I didn't even have time to get out from under the bike. Result: a broken collarbone, four broken ribs, and road rash in a couple of spots (note: I was wearing canvas pants with double fabric in the knees and seat, a leather jacket, gloves, boots, and a real helmet. The pants did pretty well, but did wear through in one place on my left knee. The rash to my right wrist was between the jacket and the gloves). My recovery took ten weeks.

Lessons Learned: 1) Don't be afraid to open up your following distance. I try to apply a three second rule that allows me to vary my distance according to speed. 2) Watch out for changes in the road surface. Its not just slippery stuff that can cause a problem, but road composition and contour. 3) At the age of 50, I don't just bounce anymore...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It sounds like there are lots of opinions about dumping /crashing your bike. Granted the majority of crashes are caused by someone else but nonetheless the happen. But I agree that if you ride cautiously and know who or what’s around you, you can minimize the number of times you hit the ground.

I get on the throttle a lot when traffic allows and I’m in the right place. Just yesterday I shifted out of 4th at 105 on a wide open toll road…

I just read that a rider went down yesterday and didn’t make it up. Was he riding within his limits or was he at wrong place at the wrong time?
I hate reading about a biker going down but I think knowing 'that it can happen to you' truly helps.

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/accident-westminster-woman-2234358-old-driver
 
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