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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
I have a 2019 RS and i'm thinking removing the ASI and O2 sensor, and have a couple of questions:

TuneECU had the option to remove both the ASI and O2 in the software, for the 675 Street Triple Tune. However, TuneECU has the ASI removal embedded in the software, but it doesn't have the O2 removal option for the RS tune, how come? so, the only option to remove the O2 sensor is with the help of an O2 sensor eliminator. has anyone done it, any recomendations?

I installed a SC project S1 slip on, and I want to get rid of the ASI and O2 to let the tune work without emission restriction taking over the tune at certain RPMs.
does the bike work better without the emission crap. I'm all about performance, whenever possible.

so you guys now, I'm not new to the Street Triple Family, I had 2009 for 10 seasons. with full SC project race exhaust, ASI and O2 removed, using Tune ECU and removing the parts too. Dyno Tuned.

one more question, would Dyno Tune give me more low and mid torque, or is the bike maxed out?
also, thinking going -15 on the front sprocket to get to optimal RPMs quicker... any thoughts on this too?

Safe Rides!!
 

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Why even bother with TuneECU? I don't get the hype and there's next to 0 support. A RapidBike EVO module is superior anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey there wfujay,

Well, TuneECU, is/was the only way to get access/tune/clear error codes with.
And if you Dyno the Street Triple, the tune is going to be done with TuneECU.
Can you tell me why/how RapidBike Evo is the better choise, do you use RapidBike in your Triple?

Thanks for writing back!
 

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Hey there wfujay,

Well, TuneECU, is/was the only way to get access/tune/clear error codes with.
And if you Dyno the Street Triple, the tune is going to be done with TuneECU.
Can you tell me why/how RapidBike Evo is the better choise, do you use RapidBike in your Triple?

Thanks for writing back!
For starters:

1. A dyno tune is still a static tune that is only optimal for the ambient conditions the shop is configured for at that precise moment, while the RapidBike module tunes in real time, according to the ambient conditions that you are actually riding in constantly. It also connects to all injectors of your bike and does closed loop tuning (which Power Commander can't do). I believe there's a progress notification of about 200 miles to where your ideal map is complete and then you can save the map, and then let it continue to auto-adjust from there.

2. There is a race module that allows you to adjust ignition and timing for proper dyno tunes, plus the ability to auto-tune in real time thereafter. This module also includes track handy features like RPM management, engine braking management, pit-lane limiter, launch control etc.

3. There's additional plug and play addons for the EVO or Racing modules, such as a quickshifter/auto-blipper (which is supposedly smoother than the stock Triumph shifter), and a wideband o2 sensor option for instant and even more accurate auto tuning on the fly.

4. Great support from the guys at RapidBike.us. They'll even assist your local tuner with dyno tuning with the race module if you choose that route. Good luck finding anyone who wants to touch TuneECU.

5. Free, intuitive software, that lets you adjust certain values manually.

6. The guys at Motovation use it on all their Ducati's, and Brentuning uses their MyGenius handheld OBDII device for ECU flashing on the BMW's, Aprillia's, Ducati's etc that come to their shop.

7. Plug and play, doesn't void warranty.

There's probably more things that I'm forgetting, but honestly RapidBike is the defacto tuning solution in the motorcycle world imo and I'm shocked I don't hear more about it on these forums. In fact, people that are throwing slip ons on their Triumphs here and not using a RapidBike are not even seeing the advantages the slip on could provide, and most likely even making performance worse. Google some of the reviews on the BMW S1000RR, Aprillia, and Ducati forums if you want to see the tons of positive feedback.

I don't personally have one yet as I just bought my Triple a few weeks ago and I'm still breaking it in, but I've ridden a buddy's FZ-09 before and after an EVO module installed and it's a night and day difference. I'll absolutely be ordering an EVO module and the wideband o2 sensor add on when it starts warming up next season, along with an SC Project SC1R full exhaust.
 

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rbscoot - I don't have answer for you, as I have a 675 and haven't gone that far down the rabbit hole yet.

wfujay - Rapid Bike offers a great product for sure. But, for a backyard performance junkie mechanic like myself that just needs to correct the map for a slip on, and reset the occasional service light, you can't beat the $65 I have invested for TuneECU. Sure support is minimal. But, honestly, if you need support besides basic directions for something like this, you probably shouldn't be messing around with it in the first place.

Reflashing my bike with TuneECU made a huge difference. It restored most all of the low end torque I lost with the slip on and stock tune, it accelerates faster, gained 3mph on top (139mph-142mph), and went from being able to barely pick up the front tire to being able to stand the bike straight up and down. So, again, if you don't know what you're doing then Rapid Bike is definitely the route to go. But, if you DO know what you're doing, there is nothing wrong with TuneECU.
 

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rbscoot - I don't have answer for you, as I have a 675 and haven't gone that far down the rabbit hole yet.

wfujay - Rapid Bike offers a great product for sure. But, for a backyard performance junkie mechanic like myself that just needs to correct the map for a slip on, and reset the occasional service light, you can't beat the $65 I have invested for TuneECU. Sure support is minimal. But, honestly, if you need support besides basic directions for something like this, you probably shouldn't be messing around with it in the first place.

Reflashing my bike with TuneECU made a huge difference. It restored most all of the low end torque I lost with the slip on and stock tune, it accelerates faster, gained 3mph on top (139mph-142mph), and went from being able to barely pick up the front tire to being able to stand the bike straight up and down. So, again, if you don't know what you're doing then Rapid Bike is definitely the route to go. But, if you DO know what you're doing, there is nothing wrong with TuneECU.
I know how to flash a TuneECU map, it's actually quite simple. It's actually EASIER than installing a RapidBike module. I'm not denying that flashing a static map to your ECU won't improve the stock map when a slip on is added, but you're still not getting the full benefits without a dyno tune, and even then, a dyno tune map is still static for those conditions. But like I said, good luck finding a good dyno tuner that will touch TuneECU.

You can also do the same thing with the RapidBike handheld OBDII device (export and flash maps from different bikes) with the same or better results.

If you like a cheap, semi-complete-but-not-quite-there solution with no support to speak of, then TuneECU is for you. If you want a superior solution with tons of support and features, RapidBike is for you.
 

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I know how to flash a TuneECU map, it's actually quite simple. It's actually EASIER than installing a RapidBike module. I'm not denying that flashing a static map to your ECU won't improve the stock map when a slip on is added, but you're still not getting the full benefits without a dyno tune, and even then, a dyno tune map is still static for those conditions. But like I said, good luck finding a good dyno tuner that will touch TuneECU.

You can also do the same thing with the RapidBike handheld OBDII device (export and flash maps from different bikes) with the same or better results.

If you like a cheap, semi-complete-but-not-quite-there solution with no support to speak of, then TuneECU is for you. If you want a superior solution with tons of support and features, RapidBike is for you.
Nice rebuttal. But, I don't recall stating anywhere at all that A: I was interested in dyno tuning, or B: that I would ever under any circumstance let anyone else but myself take a wrench or computer to my bike? You already commented very thoroughly your opinion on Rapid Bike. Funny thing is you contradict yourself. First you say the auto tune is so wonderful that you don't need to tune the bike. Then 2 sentences later, you say that Rapid Bike is much more user friendly for a dyno tune. Then end your entire post with the fact that you don't even own the system. So, basically you're just spitting off info that you read and have never actually applied.

So, while your opinion is valued, it really is completely invalid if you don't have any hands on experience with either system. Further more, the Rapid Bike system does not appear to do any diagnostics what so ever. So essentially, even if you spend $800 on Rapid Bike, you still need to invest in another system specifically for reading/clearing codes, performing troubleshooting, resetting service lights, and be able to turn on and off individual sensors and circuits. So, at $65, TuneECU is still WAY more bang for the buck for someone like myself that does all my own mechanical work and tuning.
 

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Nice rebuttal. But, I don't recall stating anywhere at all that A: I was interested in dyno tuning, or B: that I would ever under any circumstance let anyone else but myself take a wrench or computer to my bike? You already commented very thoroughly your opinion on Rapid Bike. Funny thing is you contradict yourself. First you say the auto tune is so wonderful that you don't need to tune the bike. Then 2 sentences later, you say that Rapid Bike is much more user friendly for a dyno tune. Then end your entire post with the fact that you don't even own the system. So, basically you're just spitting off info that you read and have never actually applied.

So, while your opinion is valued, it really is completely invalid if you don't have any hands on experience with either system. Further more, the Rapid Bike system does not appear to do any diagnostics what so ever. So essentially, even if you spend $800 on Rapid Bike, you still need to invest in another system specifically for reading/clearing codes, performing troubleshooting, resetting service lights, and be able to turn on and off individual sensors and circuits. So, at $65, TuneECU is still WAY more bang for the buck for someone like myself that does all my own mechanical work and tuning.
I test rode a very nice used 2012 Speed Triple that I was considering buying before I bought my 2018 Street Triple. It had a TuneECU "Arrow" flash on it, but funny enough, a different slip on altogether. Most TuneECU users I've seen do this (use the Arrow map with a different slip on). This is not ideal for at least two reasons:

1. The map wasn't made for that specific bike
2. The map wasn't made for any exhaust other than the Arrow exhaust

This means the maps are still not going to run ideally, unless tuned on a dyno for your bike. Every bike is different, and ambient conditions matter. The Speed rode fine for the most part, relatively smooth, good power, but I could tell it just wasn't quite "right". There were occasional minor hesitations and flat spots in the mid range. The rest is history for me, although I know some people are fine with mediocrity. I personally, would never be happy with a "kinda-right" static map.

I do have experience with RapidBike. Like I said, I've ridden a buddy's FZ-09 before and after adding an EVO module, which I helped him install, and it is wonderful. It does a VERY good job of fine tuning AFR's in both closed and open loop, using all injectors, even with the stock O2 sensors. It actually felt like a different bike, so I can only imagine how good it would be with their wideband O2 kit. Also, the module for Street Triple's are $525, although he bought his used for $400. Not sure where you're getting $800 from. Why would I need to "invest" in anything else for diagnostics when I can just plug in the cable and use TuneECU for that? It's the only thing I'd need it for.

The RapidBike is more user friendly for a dyno tune, if you choose to go that route. The majority of tuners won't touch TuneECU or know anything about it, and most end-users that use it, are just guessing and don't even apply some of the most important parameters. I've talked to Yaman on the phone, who is the US distributor and tuner for RapidBike, and he stated he would be very happy to assist any local tuner I chose with the software and tuning process, although I found a tuner a few hours away that already uses RapidBike, so I may go that route. Regardless, they have great support if you choose to utilize it.

I personally believe TuneECU had massive potential, and a lot of shops missed out on an opportunity to get familiar with a free software that can perform true EFI tuning on bikes, but it never gained traction simply because it's seriously lacking in support. Nevertheless, I stand by my opinion that TuneECU is currently an incomplete solution, while RapidBike is superior in every way (minus installation/application). The Ducati, BMW, Aprillia, and other communites have already picked up on this and I'm quite frankly baffled that it never happened in this community.
 
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