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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ater seeing Seth's (D9) thread regarding removing the bushings in the top triple for the bar risers I decided to tackle this myself.

As some of you saw, Seth had the idea of drilling out the rubber isolator portion, and then punching out the out bushing race. This works, but it very laborious and messy and has the potential to damage the triple.

I decided the best method would simply be to extract them opposite the way they were installed from the factory.

What you will need for this:

* A second person to help hold the triple
* A vice to hold the bottom nut (see below)
* A long section of threaded rod (minimum 7-8")
* A large diameter deep socket big enough to fit on top of the triple, and larger than the riser bushings
* 13mm deep socket (or equivalent steel spacer)
* A couple of washers (two for top of top socket, one for under bottom socket/spacer.


I have taken pictures to show how this will work. Essentially it acts as a simple bearing press.

Here you can see the entire assembly together. Vice is holding the nut on the bottom. Above it is a small washer and 13mm socket. On top is the large socket (I used the 32mm axle socket I had but any socket large enough to fit the bushing inside will work). On top of that large socket are two greased washers and another nut. Running through it all is a long section of threaded rod.



While having a friend hold the triple steady, you tighten the top nut. As you do, it will draw the rod through the triple, pulling the bottom socket up through the triple. This will slowly press the bushings out of the triple. It will take a bit of force, and the fewer stops between pulls on the wrench the better (I recommend a ratcheting wrench if you have). It takes a few minutes but eventually you will draw the bushing all the way out until it is captured in the large upper socket.

At this point, you can loosen the nut on top and disassemble it.



*Note* I wrapped the large socket in two old nitrile gloves and layed a section of blue shop towel folded into a this square underneath it to protect the finish on the triple. This is very important as there is a lot of force applied here which otherwise might damage the finish.



So, once you've finished pressing out both bushings on the vise you end up with this. Nice clean removal with (should you ever choose) the ability to press them back in and revert back to a handlebar.



Now you are ready to install the triple back onto the bike. To plug the holes, I decided to pic up two metal 1" plugs from my local sears hardware. Cost $2.00. Using my friends drill press I brushed the surface finish to a nice engine turned look just like Seth had in his thread.

Here they are installed, with the finally assembly all back together.



Total cost for materials at your local hardware store should be no more than $10-15 for the threaded rod, washers, nuts, etc. I happened to have all this stuff laying around from a previous project though so I lucked out.

Total time it took my friend and I to do this after I removed the triple was about a half hour. I'd say maybe an hour and a half job total what with removing and re-installing the top triple.


I'd rate the difficulty of this mod at around 3, very easy.

Hope you enjoyed the write-up!
 

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I tried this last night and it didn't work. As I tightened down the top nut the rubber between the inner and outer bushing would deform by about 1/4". Applying more turns resulted in the 3/8" rod I was using to strip.

I wonder if applying heat would help?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
3/8" rod is too weak. The rod I was using was a 1/4" thick and was strong enough to do both.

Get a 1/4 thick piece of rod with the right size nuts and it should work for ya. Lots of grease helps too. The second the outer sleeve starts to slip you have to keep the momentum going.


I didn't want to heat the triple as it's aluminum. To get enough heat into it to cause enough expansion I felt might weaken the material.


I should note the second one came out with about a 1/3 the effort the first one required. Guess the tolerances were ever so slightly different between the two.
 

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3/8 > 1/4 :)

I think that 3/8 is the largest rod that will fit through the riser ... I might try fine threads and a taller nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Crap, I meant 5/8 lol. My bad dude, I just checked the rod thickness (hehe) last night and it's 5/8".

It should be the next size up from the 3/8" rod. That extra bit should keep it from stripping as the threads are thicker and deeper on the 5/8" rod.
 

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Crap, I meant 5/8 lol. My bad dude, I just checked the rod thickness (hehe) last night and it's 5/8".

It should be the next size up from the 3/8" rod. That extra bit should keep it from stripping as the threads are thicker and deeper on the 5/8" rod.
More evidence that we need the metric system. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Not sure if there's a specific name for them, but they were call plug caps or something similar. They were in the bins in the hardware section of my local sears hardware. They had black plastic plugs in the same section as well.


Edit: This is what they look like. http://www.sears.com/clipsandfasteners-10-metal-plug-buttons-1-2inch-hole/p-SPM6257919904?prdNo=8&blockNo=8&blockType=G8&PDP_REDIRECT=false&s_tnt=39869:4:0

You can probably find something similar in most hardware stores I'd imagine, and should be able to buy them individually.
 
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