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Yesterday, I installed the heavier green Barnett clutch springs to my bike. I figured I'd state my observations for anyone interested in doing this, as I had to search several threads for the full details.

My set-up: I have a 2007 T-100 with 10,000 miles on it. I am running Dominator touring pipes with no airbox or AI. I can't remember what my jets are, but that is insignificant in this discussion. I drilled the carb slide for faster throttle response after about 1,000 miles. I have been running Mobil 1 synthetic since the 500 mile service. I weigh 205 lbs.

I feel like the clutch has been slipping a bit over the last 1,000 miles. I drive it like i stole it most of the time, and the clutch has been chattering a little more in 1st and 2nd, and seems to ease its way into 3rd, 4th, and 5th, instead of pulling hard when I give it the gas.

I'm not going to go into the mechanics of how to swap out the springs, because it is pretty easy. All you have to do is take off the clutch cover and remove the 4 spring retainer bolts to get the springs out. No special tools are needed. The whole process including draining the oil and adding new oil took about 2 hours and 3 beers.

Several things to note:
Buy a new clutch cover gasket before you crack the case. I ordered one and it took about a week. It cost $7, and was worth it, because the old gasket broke in pieces and had to be scraped off with a razor blade. Put a rag on your clutch when you do this, as little pieces of gasket can fall into the gears. The Triumph mechanic suggested using gasket shelack on the new gasket. I used permatex indian head from advanced autoparts. It comes in a brown 2oz bottle and costs under $3. I brushed it on both sides of the gasket and hung it on a screw driver for an hour to dry. The shelack is a good sealant and allows the gasket to stick to the case without moving around during installation. I stuck mine to the engine side first and pressing it on all around, then stuck the cover on. I would highly recommend using a reliable torque wrench when putting everything back together so that you don't over or under tighten anything and cause leaks.

Conclusions:
I had to adjust the clutch a bit to compensate for the new spring pressure, but I am very happy with the results. It is not a miraculous improvement or anything, but it does give the bike a more even pull through the gears and the power is more even and evident at the lower end of each gear. 1st and 2nd chatter less than before and the cluth engages much faster with very little slippage and less throttle. I do not notice that the clutch lever takes much more hand strength to pull. The whole process costs about $30 including springs, gasket, shelack. This does not include the price of the oil and the filter, which you will have to replace as well. It is worth the money and is an easy modification for those intimidated to crack their cases.

One other observation:
Everyone raves about Rotella on this forum, so I gave it a go and I am very pleased. It's hard to describe feeling the consistency of oil when you drive, but I'll try. The Mobil 1 I was using was very smooth and silky, but sometimes I felt like it didn't "bite" into the gears enough. The Rotella feels like like it giving the motor a little more friction, but in a good way, like all of the parts are rubbing each other more to get more power. Let's just says that Mobil 1 is a Smithwicks and Rotella is a Guinness. They're both good, but Guinness has got something extra to it that you can't pinpoint right away.
 

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you can lean the bike waaay over to the right and won't have to dump the oil.

I've messed with the clutch quite a bit, and when I have to get in there I'll take off the seat and tank, cover the alt cover with a shop rag and duct tape, and lean the whole bike over against a tree.

Another "gotcha" to watch out for: Don't lose the wavy washer on the starter gear!

Also, if you want, you can remove all that crap that's bolted to the inside of the engine cover. The big flat aluminum thing with the rubber pad behind it. It's only in there for sound-deadening. I 86'd mine and can't tell a difference, and it saved a few ounces of weight on the bike!
 

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So where does one get this clutch cover gasket? Is there a part number?
 

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Thanks - I think I found it (2008 bonnie but I did it on bike bandit). Mike from Bellacorse suggested that while I was in there to replace the breather seal and gear change / shifter shaft seal, and even the clutch actuator arm seal.

I found that cover seal, and the shifter shaft seal - I think I found the oil breather seal - anyone know which one is the clutch actuator arm seal?
 

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anyone know which one is the clutch actuator arm seal?
Number 2 on this drawing..........




Part number T3600095

NB..... And the sound-deadening stuff which Sweat referes to is No's 33 and 34.

V.
 

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Number 2 on this drawing..........




Part number T3600095

NB..... And the sound-deadening stuff which Sweat referes to is No's 33 and 34.

V.
Is there really no other possible purpose for parts 33&34 other than sound deadining?! looks like a pretty big/complicated piece of gear just to shave of a few unnoticable decibels....
 

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Is there really no other possible purpose for parts 33&34 other than sound deadining?!......
Item 34 is just a big bit of thick rubber. Seen here............



Item 33 (top left of that photo) is just the tinwork to keep it all in place.

Serves no purpose other than reducing clutch noise.

They're even described in the Triumph parts list as "Pad, sound suppression" and "Plate, sound pad".

That says it all! :)


V.
 

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I did the green spring installation yesterday while my clutch cover is off for powder coating. I have a question about it though.

The center part (bushing?), as noted in other things I've read/watched, pulled out with barely any force. But I am having a hard time getting it back into place and fitting how it is supposed to. I know there is a special tool but that it can be done without it. I am just curious if anybody has any tips for this or if it really is a game of repeated guess and check?
 

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I did the green spring installation yesterday while my clutch cover is off for powder coating. I have a question about it though.

The center part (bushing?), as noted in other things I've read/watched, pulled out with barely any force. But I am having a hard time getting it back into place and fitting how it is supposed to. I know there is a special tool but that it can be done without it. I am just curious if anybody has any tips for this or if it really is a game of repeated guess and check?
Trial & error...could take 4 seconds or 4 hours :eek:
Fortunately not the 4+ years of this dormant thread :D
 

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Trial & error...could take 4 seconds or 4 hours :eek:
Fortunately not the 4+ years of this dormant thread :D
Lol I was trying to decide which would be better, revive a dead thread or start a new one and piss people off by not using the search feature.

Good thing I have plenty of time to get it right before my clutch cover is done being powder coated.
 

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It can be tricky if you don't have the special tool. My experience was taking the bolts down incrementally while checking the plunger but then when I got to the end to where the bolts were getting tight the plunger would get tight also so by taking the handle end of my socket tool I casually pried the plate back and forth until the plunger loosened up and then torqued down then bolts a little more and if I had to pry the plate again I would until all bolts were torqued and the plunger was relatively still loose.
 
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