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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone direct me to any postings:confused: that deal with installing a Gixer front forks on a Speed Triple?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Gixer Forks

I don't mind giving you a resume on my riding skills if you want, but if you have ever tried to do any serious trail braking on a Speed Triple, you know what I am talking about. I am a fairly aggressive rider an I ride a lot, I like the ergos of the Speed Triple but I want a more performance driven front suspension. Can you direct me to any posts dealing with the conversion?
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I don't recall anyone making this switch or why they would. Heres a start though.

'08 GSXR 1000 = 43mm Kayaba

'08 Speed Triple = 45mm Showa

both inverted and fully adjustable.
 

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43mm-45mm? I don't understand your post.
Triumph fork legs are 2mm thicker. That's what he ment.

So you'll need to (if possible) adapt the Gixxer clamps on Triumph steering head. But then you'll lose the Triumph handlebars as the Gixxer top clamp probably does not have enough meat for drilling.

Machining one-off triple clamps always works, but will push the total cost of conversion close to getting proper aftermarket replacement forks in 45mm Triumph OD.
 

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old guy.
Why do you want to go to Gixer front forks?

If it's a 2008 it already has Showa USD forks.
There is USD and there is USD. GSX-R forks are superior performance wise, but much cheaper than full blown Öhlins. By the sounds of it he just wants an upgrade.
 

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Triumph fork legs are 2mm thicker. That's what he ment.

So you'll need to (if possible) adapt the Gixxer clamps on Triumph steering head. But then you'll lose the Triumph handlebars as the Gixxer top clamp probably does not have enough meat for drilling.

Machining one-off triple clamps always works, but will push the total cost of conversion close to getting proper aftermarket replacement forks in 45mm Triumph OD.
Martin - the 43 & 45 refer to the lower section diameters, not the uppers that locate in the triples.

Old guy - I don't believe anyone has done a Gixxer swap on an 05+

I don't know if you went to my signature link but there is a lot of general information there but it pertains to the older model.

It would be easier if you retain the original triple clamps but they are not a straight fit. For example the Triumph has a 52mm top clamp and the GSXRs are all 50mm. If using 05/06 Kayabas these have 54mm diameter at the lower triple, or the 07+ have 56mm diameter at the lower triple. The 06+ Showa off the 750 is 50 at the top & 53mm at the bottom. (I have the Showas installed on the TL vs the 05/06 Kayabas I have on the Triumph)
The advantage of using the Triumph triples is that you will have no issues with the bars etc and the rotor spacing should be good. You would need a spacer shim sleeve for the top clamp and depending on the Triumph leg diameter, need either a spacer shim or machining to accommodate the bottom triple.

If using the GSXR triples, the rotors would be offset by 1mm (too wide); GSXR wheel has rotors at 132mm center-center spacing, with the Triumph of that vinatge at 134mm. That may not be a big deal in itself although you could machine 1mm off the inside hub mount of the rotors to perfectly center them (I used this technique to adapt my TL wheel to the GSXR forks) Bigger issue would be there is no top clamp available for bar risers and you have to mess with the ignition. You will get a handling change - the 05/06 1K and the 06+ 750s are all 30mm offset, while the 07+ 1K is 28mm. Those will both give you shorter trail - which you may or not want, just to be aware of it.

There is no speedo drive to worry about so that makes life easier - axle spacers should be simple to work out, both use 25mm axles. You need the axle for the GSXR legs regardless.

If you (or anyone else) has a caliper and can get me the following measurements, I could give you better specifics as to what the best way to do this might be.
Triumph - Confirm fork/ rotor spacing dimensions:
Upper clamp fork leg diameter
Lower clamp fork leg diameter
Rotor Spacing (measure across outside faces the subtract one rotor thickness)
If possible, also the fork spacing center - center (measure across between the legs and add one leg diameter at point of measurement)
 

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So what's so great about them?

and/or is it certain model runs?
I have only experience with 06 GSXR1000 front. It is just more supple all around. Eats sharp bumps without jolting to the handlebars, but still does a good job on general damping. On Triumph it seems it's either one or the other, but impossible to get fast/slow speed damping both to a nice ballpark.

Might of course be that some of the effect is due to the Gixxer being more balanced and not so top heavy as the fat birds we ride.

The suspension shop I took my 2005 forks to commented that the 1050 fork innards were like 1997 GSX-R 750's. On that light seems that Hinckley people might have been shopping at the Showa bargain bin.

Anyways, the forks on my 1050 are good enough for me and the 15 year old chassis design. They are definitely not bad enough to get me to bother with full replacement. Revalving and re-springing maybe, but replacing might be a bit overkill as it won't hide the top heavyness and chassis problems anyway.
 

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I have only experience with 06 GSXR1000 front. It is just more supple all around. Eats sharp bumps without jolting to the handlebars, but still does a good job on general damping. On Triumph it seems it's either one or the other, but impossible to get fast/slow speed damping both to a nice ballpark.

Might of course be that some of the effect is due to the Gixxer being more balanced and not so top heavy as the fat birds we ride.

The suspension shop I took my 2005 forks to commented that the 1050 fork innards were like 1997 GSX-R 750's. On that light seems that Hinckley people might have been shopping at the Showa bargain bin.

Anyways, the forks on my 1050 are good enough for me and the 15 year old chassis design. They are definitely not bad enough to get me to bother with full replacement. Revalving and re-springing maybe, but replacing might be a bit overkill as it won't hide the top heavyness and chassis problems anyway.
Martin_R
Have to agree that they are made to a price.

How well these forks improve by re-valving and oil quality seems yet to be discovered or discussed.
Having compression damping on one fork and rebound damping on the other fork is the cheap way.
Need to try to keep the forks working together, maybe a fork brace should help.

Question is.
Who has tried re-valving these Showa's?
with/without a fork brace?
Fork oil weight, relevent to re-valving too.

Springs are more relevent to riders weight.
 

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Having compression damping on one fork and rebound damping on the other fork is the cheap way.
Agree. This was the fashion in the 90s, but other brands have moved on 10 years ago.


Who has tried re-valving these Showa's?
with/without a fork brace?
Fork oil weight, relevent to re-valving too.

Springs are more relevent to riders weight.
I had the 2005 forks worked. Changed springs, suspension gurus played around with the shims in an effor to improve fast speed damping reaction times and changed the oil (to 7.5 WP, I believe).

This helped some. Did not make the forks great, but a definite improvement.

Don't know about the brace. The fork bodies look beefy enough for not to have any major flex.

The OEM springs are progressive (or rather 2 rate) so changing to single rate springs might make at least adjustments more consistent. There has also been some talk about the closely wound part of the stock spring being too stiff, so in effect it is just acting more like a bump stop, instead of a spring.

Stock springs:
 

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Fashion of the nineties or more just made to a price.

I have a 99 model Aprillia RSV with Showa's, difference being.
Adjustable damping and rebound on both forks.

Having compression damping on one fork and rebound damping on the other fork would be similar to having different spring rates in each fork.
--- Well almost anyway---

When they did the shim job, did they measure the springs?

"The fork bodies look beefy enough for not to have any major flex"
Well flex for and aft maybe not, but (with) keeping the same compression consistent?

Question is, where will these twisting forces go?
 

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....
If you (or anyone else) has a caliper and can get me the following measurements, I could give you better specifics as to what the best way to do this might be.
Triumph - Confirm fork/ rotor spacing dimensions:
Upper clamp fork leg diameter
Lower clamp fork leg diameter
Rotor Spacing (measure across outside faces the subtract one rotor thickness)
If possible, also the fork spacing center - center (measure across between the legs and add one leg diameter at point of measurement)
Anyone?
 

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I think we lost our original poster. I didn't do much checking but seems that you could find a closer match than the GSXR forks.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Gixer Forks

I'm still here and I have been reading all the post. I want to thank everyone for their input. I am still in the process of deciding on the direction that I want to go. I do know that I will make a change in the front forks because as some have posted, it,s a loss cause to try to make the Speed Triple front forks performance complaint. I'm going around to the dealers with my ruler and calibers and getting measurements. Keep the posts coming with your ideas.
Thanks
 
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