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My advice to you is to buy a service manual, either Haynes or Triumph's own. I suspect the Haynes would be more appropriate for you. Actually, the replacement of the cam cover is the more critical part of what you intend to do. The bolts that secure it are tapped in to the cam bearing caps and there have been cases where people have stripped these threads. You also need to be careful with the cover seal to ensure you don't subsequently suffer from oil leaks. It's not a difficult job, but some care (and the appropriate tools including a torque wrench) is needed. Removing the tank is the easy bit.
 

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Definitely what PAAS said.
 

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Oh, come on. Take the plunge. Take off the seat, remove the two bolts holding the tank in place and lift up the back of the tank. Look underneath and disconnect everything hooked to the tank. How hard can it be?
 

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I did this very thing last week to fit some extras on my 2008 speedy , see below


1: drain fuel from tank, you must get out as much as possible otherwise when you disconnect the fuel line it will leak all over the engine.

2: remove centre console by undoing the 3 hex bolts, the wireling loom had a joint under a rubber shroud.

3: remove seat and remove the bolt holding the tank in place, also remove rubber washer and place safe.

4 Lift tank from rear so you can see underneath clearly, from the right hand side reach underneath and pull off the small rubber hose going to tank, this just pushes on a spigot with no latch.

5: remove cabling loom attached to tank

6: now from the left hand side you can see the fuel line going to the tank, i found it easier to remove this from the tank rather than the engine, it has a push on fitting with a locking mechanism, it then also has an orange cover than also lock on to hold it in place,

Slide the orange cover to one side , this then should also press in the locking buttons on the connector as well and with a put it should release, however I found that I had to remove the orange cover from the connector and slide it further up towards the tank, then on either side of the connector their are buttons to press in, push these then pull and it should disconnect.

7 Finally lift the tank at the rear and it should slide out backwards to wards you. Make sure the rubbers on the two spigots that hold the tank at the front are on before refitting.

Hope this helps.
 

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Oh, come on. Take the plunge. Take off the seat, remove the two bolts holding the tank in place and lift up the back of the tank. Look underneath and disconnect everything hooked to the tank. How hard can it be?
The tank, no problem. The cam cover, a bit more involved.
 

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I guess I should sort of apologize for throwing that out there. I'm a crusty ol' shade tree mechanic with no fear. I had to yank the engine out of my first car and completely disassemble it to get to an oil galley plug that removed itself. No book, few tools, makeshift boom. and no money, of course. My dad taught me to just take things apart and fix them.
 

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im guessing that it only runs untill the fuel line is up to pressure as when you turn one the ignition it runt ten stops
 

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Thats crazy. Do they figure that the fuel pump won`t push gas if the engine isn`t running,or what?
Er, no. The pump is electrically driven so if the ignition is turned off it won't be pumping. It doesn't stop after pressurising the system either, it is required to run all the time the engine is running to supply the injectors. This is no longer a gravity fed system using float bowls as reservoirs, hence no fuel tap. No fuel injected bike I've ever ridden has had a fuel tap. Does your car have one? This is nothing out of the ordinary.
 

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Hey Paul,Thanks for the info.It just seemed strange to me that the tank would have to be drained for removal.
No problem. Bit of a nuisance really. I think I would be inclined to fit some sort of in-line tap if I was intending to remove the tank more frequently than required for routine maintenance.
 

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There are auto-shutoff quick-disconnect fuel line connectors available. I'd install one of them if I didn't have another way to shut off the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hey guys,

Job successfully done. I managed to change the cam covers on my friend's Triumph America. Job was smoothly done. Thanks to everyone for sharing ideas. I will post some pictures of the project ASAP

Regards,
Noel
 

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nope just a fuel line from the tank down to the engine.
Noticed that myself the day I picked up my efi Bonnie. You get use to it fairly quickly, only trouble was when I wanted to start my other bike (Honda :rolleyes:) which didn't get a look at for the first 3 months of Bonnie ownership :p .....you'd think the bike would start?
Nearly drained the battery and decided to put it back in the garage when I noticed one important thing - juice was switched off :eek:
 
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