Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are currently building a new house with a nice motorcycle parking area / workshop area.

I have been considering getting the garage floor coated prior to moving in, with something like epoxy coating. Does anyone have any experience with these floors in general?

What about using this type of garage floor coating with a motorcycle? My biggest concern would be creating a surface that might get very slick with a bit of oil or gas which could lead to embarrassment or injury on or off the bike.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
They make non-slip coatings with sand (?) already mixed in with the epoxy. That's what I would use if I had a garage floor to coat.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks!

Thanks, Kit! I will look for those. It sounds like that would help with traction. Does it make the floor harder to clean due to the texture?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,790 Posts
http://www.torginol.com/

Too many options to list here, but I've used this and it's very good. Applying it before you move in is nearly essential, cause that stuff STINKS while it is drying.

We used this product in a Bathroom back in the 70's. Floor, 1/2 of the walls and inside the custom made shower. It's still there and holding up wonderfully. I know of a couple of garage floors with it from the same time and they are also holding up well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
Make sure to check whether the concrete needs to cure and/or dry a certain amount of time before you put any coating on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
844 Posts
I used to use large pieces of cardboard or a thin sheet of plywood. Have the joints cut instead of formed (the seams formed to keep the floor from cracking). Much nicer to roll things over. Well worth the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Garage Floor Coating

Ton-r,
I haven't used this product, and I didn't stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night, but I did see a spot on My Classic Cars about U-Coat-It. Not sure how it compares to the garage floor products sold at Home Depot or Lowes. Good idea to do something before you move in, though. Good luck.
WOODY
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
I'd strongly advise that you consider a chemical hardener, not a surface coating.
The hardener is easy to apply and it makes a chemical reaction with the concrete to produce a denser, more water and chemical resistant natural surface that is dustproof. The appearance will be a darker gray and sealed or slick looking.
My workshop floor saw kitty pee, and it just wiped up without soaking in. Dirt whisks away without residue.
It will need reapplying some years down the road if it sees alot of traffic, but it's not difficult to redo.
Mine has been there for over 20 years, but I don't drive in and out much.
You get the hardener from a concrete construction supply place.

I watched my neighbor's epoxy bubble up and peel in random spots 2 months after he applied it, and that was on clean new concrete. A real heartbreaker.
It took commercial sandblasting to clean up the mess.

By all means DO NOT use one of those Home Depot or Lowes epoxy coating kits.
Commercial epoxy floors are a whole different animal.
Heat from hot tires tends to lift inappropriate coatings on floors.

And you are right about the sand finish. That will be a dirty floor.

Do yourself a favor and look into the chemical hardener.
Just one of many reputable manufacturers: http://www.lmcc.com/concrete_news/0607/chemistry_not_magic.asp

PS: Have the builder use 4000 psi concrete for the garage slab and put some reinforcing mesh in it as well as a poly vapor barrier under it.
It's also a good idea to "cure" the concrete for the first week to prevent premature drying (= cracks). Just cover it with a sheet of heavy poly to keep it moist.
Since you are building it new, do the best you can. House builders will scoff and resist using commercial building techniques, but that is why they are only
housebuilders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
epoxy floors

I did my garage floor in Summer of 07 with the Expoxy paint from Lowe's and followed the instructions meticulously ( washing, scouring,acid etching, etc.) and painted a beautifu, though time-consuming black and white checkerboard pattern. I then sealed it with acrylic Futura floor wax. I learned the heard way that no matter how long you let it cure, car tires will still pull up the paint from time to time and my Triumph k-stand definitely scratches it. So, I retouch it when necesasary and have gone to using mats under the tires, which work real well AND give me a good guide where to park my car and where my wife's car SHOULD be!. If I had it all to do over, I would have perservered in my shoppong until I found vinyl peel-and-stick tiles---much less work and replacing them one by one would have been a breeze. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all of the helpful comments

Thanks to all of you for the helpful comments.

Beemie, I really appreciate your information on the differences between the epoxy surfaces and the chemical hardening. The foundation was poured about a month ago, but I will look into what they can do from here. Luckily, it should be nicely cured by now. ;-)

Billybonny, thanks for the comments on your experience with the DIY epoxy floor. It does not sound too bad. I would expect to have to do touchups from time to time.

All in all, I am rethinking whether I should even do this. I am not sure it is worth the trouble. They do look great, but I have lived without one so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
go for it

Hey Ton,
Even though I have an occasional touch up to do, and wish I had used vinyl tiles, when I wash out my gararge floor I am still glad I did it. Everyone who sees it say WOW!!!! That looks goooooood; like a showroom, and it really does. My wife has a little red Benz conv and the Bonneville is pure retro class. I've painted the walls, put up lots of bike posters and neon and the garage is now my favorite room in the house. I would move my bed out there if I could get by with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Sounds pretty cool, Billybonny. Any photos of your garage?

I have seen people with garages that are so nice you just want to hang out there. Perhaps I should ask the builder to install a coax cable near the workbench so I can put in a big flat screen TV. ;-) Just kidding, sorta.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
no pics as yet

Ton,
No pics as yet. My wife is the camera buff and pc pro; maybe I can get her to help out with the pics. A word of caution: After I did the floor, walls, posters, neon etc, I was so proud I would leave the gararge door open almost all the time for passerbys to gawk at. Alas, stuff started missing from my garage. Try to give folks a decent show and whada they do..steal ya blind! Just goes to show ya, "No good deed goes unpunished!" Now I'm thinking of charging admission!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
Thanks to all of you for the helpful comments.

Beemie, I really appreciate your information on the differences between the epoxy surfaces and the chemical hardening. The foundation was poured about a month ago, but I will look into what they can do from here. Luckily, it should be nicely cured by now. ;-)

Billybonny, thanks for the comments on your experience with the DIY epoxy floor. It does not sound too bad. I would expect to have to do touchups from time to time.

All in all, I am rethinking whether I should even do this. I am not sure it is worth the trouble. They do look great, but I have lived without one so far.

The hardener/sealer can be done anytime, green or cured concrete, as well as down the road, but it's easier if you don't have to clean first.

If you are serious about epoxy, you really need to go commercial.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Billy, I completely understand. I am always afraid to leave the garage door open for any time to keep people from seeing all of my toys and tools.

Beemie, I definitely want to get it done before we move in. We have just too much stuff that will need to go into the garage as soon as we move, so I want it to be ready by closing.

Thanks, everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
From my experience the paint or epoxy always seems to peel. Might take 5 or 10 years but it will start to lift, then you have to scrape and repaint and it will look like crap. I just left the cement floor as is in my garage. My father has owned a painting business for over 30 years and I've never seen a home over 10 years old that didnt have lifting paint on the garage/basement floor. Although it could have been applied poorly. We rarely did it.
If you do choose to paint the floor use a quality floor paint/epoxy. With many of them you can add rubber "sprinkles" for extra traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Someone where I work just got finished with his "garage" and he used super short synthetic charcoal grey indoor/outdoor carpet. The stuff is slip and stain resistant and he said that it was fairly cheap. If he needs to replace it in 5 years he does not mind doing so. If oil or tools get on the carpeting you cant even tell the difference.

He does have a really big LCD tv in there too. Pretty ridiculous, but still bad ass if you want to work on your bike and watch the game at the same time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Sounds like a great setup, Paul. I would be afraid that my wife would make me start sleeping in there, too. ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,211 Posts
+1 definitely to the heavy plastic vapor barrier under the slab. The person pouring it should know that, but make sure it gets done, because it's very easy to do ahead of time and very hard to retrofit.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top