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Before I remove my tank for general service (plugs,filters etc.) Does anyone know if the '05 is standard with metal or plastic fuel fittings?

And is there any easy way to check prior to removal?

Want to have ALL the parts handy to do the job right while the tank is off.
 

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'05 Tiger Fittings

Keysman, today I changed the fittings on my '05 Tiger - and they were all plastic - 2 Males and 2 Females. Now they're all metal c/o Team Triumph's fitting kit. While I was there I replaced the fuel filter (after 34K miles on the original), replaced the in-tank fuel-lines there and checked the tank sump for dirt. The worst part was emptying the tank of fuel - so have lots of rags handy.
Here's a handy webpage with some good Tiger tips. Good luck.
WOODY
PS. The fuel fitting / pump panel is visible only when you remove the left side rear panel just under the seat.
 

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Interesting, all the early Tigers and other Triumphs were all recalled to have the plastic male changed for a metal version,anyone else got a late Tiger with a plastic male?
 

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on my 2000 - I bought those same metal ones from Team Triumph... figured it would be easy.... the first one came out of the tank perfectly!.... the second one snapped off. Took a lot of heat, melting the plastic with soldering irons (The hot screwdriver melted in did not work). Eventually you get to a point where you can pull the remaining plastic out of the metal threads..... what a pain!

that fitting that snapped was probably cracked, or was going to crack.... triumph should have replaced those too!

Get the all metal ones - each end has a valve, so no fuel leaks at all when you disconnect the tank. Nice!
 

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Interesting, all the early Tigers and other Triumphs were all recalled to have the plastic male changed for a metal version,anyone else got a late Tiger with a plastic male?
Yes, mine are all plastic...
 

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It's interesting that Triumph should do the recall that that they did in 01/02 and replace them with alloy and then go back to plastic male's,best of luck.
 

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I emailed my local dealer about it, and according to them it's not a recall but a warranty replacement. If they break (apparently even after the normal warranty and subsequent owners) they replace them as a warranty part.

So you (or they) have to break one to get the new metal ones. Same apparently goes for the backwards breather seal and fuel sending units. They were not clear if this was something that was always done for everyone or if it was up to each shop.
 

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Hmmm,well i had a letter asking me to take the bike back for replacement as did others,i know the dealer well,he just gave them to me and i fitted them at home,i still have the originals,if you have plastic male and female then your on a time bomb,at home with the tools and replacements it's a nothing job,out on the road it has all the makings of a horror story,as i found out,if your a mechancial numbty and have no idea how to do the job,at least carry a spare with you so that a mechanic can do it for you,so if your are out on the road miles from home,it's another option apart from a break down truck.

When i spoke to my dealer some time back about the metal version and were to get it,he all but ripped my arm off,i'd liken the problem to VFR rectifiers,everyone knows about the problem,it just seems to get sweeped under the carpet.
 

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o2 Daytona is plastic. My biggest mistake was removing the tank when it was full and heavy. A simple bump on the frame and the connector broke of like a toothpick in a vice. I preferred plastic replacements because they won't strip the tank threads if you nicked them during a broken connector removal op.
 

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Oops

Having carefully read everything in the girly forum I was prepared to remove my fuel tank and repair the vacuum hose attached to the fuel regulator.

The tank removal and hose repair was relatively easy.

The re-installation of the fuel tank was easy until I attempted to attach the fuel supply hose, whereupon I promptly broke the female coupler.



I re-read all the posts I could find on metal fuel fittings
It appears that the fitting recall had been performed as the elbow fittings are metal while the female fitting that broke is plastic.

Since the metal fittings are not valved and gas drippage a pain I ordered all four valved fittings from QuickCoupling:

------------------------------------------------------
2 x LCD23006 - 3/8 Hose Barb Valved Elbow CPC Coupling Insert (LCD23006) =
$21.30
2 x LCD10004BSPT - 1/4 BSPT Valved CPC Coupling Body (LCD10004BSPT) = $21.00
------------------------------------------------------
Sub-Total: $42.30
Table Rate (Best Way): $8.50
Total: $50.80

They'll be here in a week or two.

So now to prepare the tank for the new firrings.

I removed the fuel pump assy





Then I removed the intact female coupler
The broken coupler broke off flush with the threads



So now I have to figure out how to remove it without damaging the threads.
I think I'll try to superglue a bolt to the plastic and see if I can un-screw it.

Any thoughts, suggestions and or questions?
 

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Jon, I`d be tempted to use an easyout(lefthand threaded extractor) but there doesnt seem to be much depth to the fitting?

Next, I`d try to tap it with a small driver and hammer(bit rough, but so am I)

Finally, the Dremmel route. Find a suitable bit and gently pare the plastic till its thin enough to shear when you whack a driver under it:eek:;)
 

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Still working it

Jon, I`d be tempted to use an easyout(lefthand threaded extractor) but there doesnt seem to be much depth to the fitting?

Next, I`d try to tap it with a small driver and hammer(bit rough, but so am I)

Finally, the Dremmel route. Find a suitable bit and gently pare the plastic till its thin enough to shear when you whack a driver under it:eek:;)
That's correct because of the valve pieces still inside there is very little depth, the easy-outs I have would need a depth of approx an inch to fit snugly.

So far super glue, and 5 minute epoxy and model glue will not bond with the plastic so I'm at the stage of slowly picking/prying/chipping small pieces out with very small flat head screwdriver and small metal piks.

It's slow going but seems as if it will work if I remain patient.
(not my strong point)

Maybe I can convince my wife to do it, she has patience enough to stay married to me so she shouldn't have a problem with it.
 

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Go buy one of those small file sets,gently file a groove through the plastic,(full length of thread)do it gently as the thread is metal you can tell as some as you come in contact with it,i've also got one of those dentist pick sets that are available but you can do it with a small electrical screwdriver and dig the plastic out,comes out very easy,just take your time.
 

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I had a different approach. I took a large screwdriver and pushed it into the plastic, so that it would bite on the plastic (not the metal thread) and form it's own slot if you get my meaning. Then, while pushing down into the broken fitting, and screwing outwards at the same time, it just started to thread itself out, leaving the threads all clean and ready for some new thread sealant and the new fitting.

Mick :cool:
 

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Fun with plastic fuel fittings

So I found I had plastic fittings after getting home one day and smelling a lot of gas, then seeing that my right pant leg was soaked in gas:mad:. Nice. I quickly saw that the plastic male fitting was leaking gas at an alarming rate and drained the tank. I called up my local dealer, and they let me know that my bike wasn't part of the recall, nice considering I could have easily been ingulfed in flames minutes earlier.
- Anyway, they said that amazingly Triumph had for some reason moved to metal fittings since they were far less prone to brittle failure than the plastic fittings. Long story short... see if you have any plastic fuel fittings, replace them before they break. The design is flat out dangerous due to the sharp changes in diameter that act as stress risers on a very brittle material (I am an engineer, so this isnt just a blind statment)
 
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