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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can't believe I've been riding for 20 years and I've never removed a wheel from a motorcycle.

So I have a pair of stands -- Vortex in back, Pit Bull up front. That part seems easy enough.

Any pointers? I have the Service Manual, so I know all the torque specs I'll need. Any recommendations regarding tools, etc.?

Really, any advice at all would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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This is one of the easiest front wheels I have removed. I don't know anything about your stands, so i can't comment there. I use centerstand, and a scissor jack and block of wood under the front of the frame.

Basically, remove front brake caliper first, suspend it with a piece of string or something so that you don't stress the brake line.

Then slacken off and remove the main nut, then slacken the pinch bolt on the right hand fork leg. Support the wheel - push the spindle out and out it comes!

When you put the wheel back in, there is no solid stop against the right side fork, so slide the spindle through the wheel, and tighten the main nut up. Replace the brake caliper - do not do the pinch bolt yet.

Put the bike back on its wheels, grab the front brake and pump the suspension a few times to seat the right fork properly, then tighten the pinch bolt.

And there you have it, you should be just fine.

As for tools - nothing special required really.
 

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Good torque wrench, 1/2" or 3/8" drive, appropriate allan keys with square drive to fit torque wrench(these are far better than the packs of loose allan keys). A cut down broom handle (good for driving axle out if it's stiff) Use a piece of string to support brake caliper. I always tape apiece of wood on front brake handle to stop kids applying brakes while wheel is off. Once you've done it you'll realise how easy it is.
 

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The spindle is very free on these - I find you can push it out with your finger once the pinch bolt is free. You could also use any piece of rod - like a socket extension bar. Don't whack it, just push on it.
 

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front wheel removal

Yes. The spindle should be pretty free. But not always, thats what the cut down broom handle is for, you aren't going to hurt much or damage anything with a piece of wood. Unless you go ballistic.
 

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i like to remove the speedo cable before removing the wheel and seal the end with a piece of tape to kkep the cable from sliding out. is easier to do when the wheel is on the bike and allows you to put the wheel out of the way so you dont knock it over/damage the disc. i usually put it in an area of the garage i am not walking around.
 

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If you really do have to tap the spindle out, using a piece of wood is definitely the best material, that is true.

EDIT: Whoops! I had completely forgotten the speedo cable, good catch sbpark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a 1/2" drive socket with a nice, long handle. I suppose that would be best for removing the spindle nut. (note to self: I need to take my caliper to that so I know what size socket I need).

As far as a torque wrench, I'll be buying one tonight. Any reason to go with 1/2" over 3/8" drive? The most torque I'll be setting is 60 nm. I suppose a larger 1/2" would be good for that, but would it be too clumsy for the brake caliper? I'd rather not buy 2, you know?
 

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i have had the front wheel off several times (about to do it again in about 5 mins) and have never had to knock out the spindle. i just use a socket to rotate it out a bit then just pull it out while supporting the wheel.
 

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Likewise.

On torque wrenches - I have a 1/2" drive for the higher values, I think you will find in due course that a 1/4" drive will be useful - a lot of the torque settings on the bike are in the 5 to 20nM range - especially engine casings and so on.
 

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front- wheel removal

The 1/2" square drive is good for the bigger stuff , for the small bits you can use a 1/2-3/8 cross over. Thats what I use. But it's entirely up to you as to which road you go down or how you wish to spend your money.
 

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Since the conversation has kind of drifted to torque wrenches, I'll toss my 2cents...

I have torque wrenches in 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 drive. The reason being is that most measuring devices, especially those that use some sort of spring are most accurate towards the middle of their measuring range.

Respectfully,

Jim
 

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front- wheel removal

Couldn't agree with you more on the three different sies of torque wrench. Unfortunately not everyone can afford or justify the cost of three differet torque wrenches.
 

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Colinm -

Believe me, I understand. I had my 1/2" wrench for 30 years doing automotive engine work before I bought the other two when I started to work on motorcycles. Then I bought the other two as I needed them. Sometimes trying to get by proves counter-productive.

I think it was Henry Ford who said something like, "If you find you need a tool, buy it. If you don't, you will find you will have paid for the tool and not have it."

When deciding which one to purchase, research the torque values of the nuts and bolts of the work you most commonly do then buy the appropriate wrench that adequately covers the range.

Depending on the level of work one normally does, a person may be able to adequately cover the needs with one or maybe two torque wrenches.

As with all tools, purchase the best you can afford, read and follow the instructions and if it's the ratchet type torque wrench, remember that it's a torque wrench and not a ratchet wrench.

Respectfully,

Jim
 

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EFI speedie needs 12mm + 19mm hex sockets if your gonna torgue up the spindle, assume the bonnie is the same?
 
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