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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Gents,
In the next couple of weeks, I will be adopting D9's excellent procedure for shortening the turn signal stalks on my new Bonny. Many know that shortening the turn signals in front with the up high turn signal position creates interference when inserting the ignition key. The workaround for Bonny owners is to install a Thruxton front turn signal bracket which lowers the position of the turn signals and I believe improves the look of the bike in front. To my eye the stock Bonneville turn signal position in front is a bit too high. British Customs makes block off plates that will cover the existing holes when relocating the turn signals into the Thruxton position...see pic below.

My question is, has anybody used their little plates and if so, how did you attach them? I guess a couple of approaches could be used...say a 3M high adhesive 2- face tape might work or perhaps a good weatherstrip contact adhesive. Don't think the plates have any mechanical attachment feature...they are simply flat. The other approach would be to purchase the same oblong plates with holes in them as you are available as well. It would seem redundant however to run fasteners to retain a cosmetic plate.
Suggestions and/or opinions?
Thanks,
George
 

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I can't understand why you'd want to do this mod solely on the grounds of looks. Blind motorist don't see us at the best of times and motorcycle indicators are much smaller by comparison with those on a car. Surely, moving them inwards towards the headlight will be a safety issue? Won't they get lost in the glare of the headlight?
 

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A fair argument...getting lost in the glare of the headlight which is debatable. I believe it really comes down to a DOT mandate in terms of what is acceptable versus what the designers wanted which clearly isn't what they want from an aesthetic standpoint and why so many end up changing them. :) I believe the salient issue is differentiating which turn signal is deployed by moving them closer together. Keep in mind the Thruxton has them lower in the "stock" position and the Bonneville is quite outside the norm for having the turnsignals at the same relative height as the headlight beam which btw refutes your point as lowering them would take them out of the glare of the headlight as you suggest. Your comment isn't lost on me however.
Best,
George
 

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You're welcome, George. Not a criticism, just an observation. Yesterday on the way to work I was nearly taken out by a blind women motorist whilst negotiating a roundabout; she approached and entered without stopping and only woke up as I took avoiding action whilst sounding my horn! Now bear in mind, my bike is bight yellow, my helmet has a yellow centre stripe (no comment on that, all you wits out there!) there's a white scarf streaming behind me and, yes, my indicators are on as I'm heading round right to take the third exit.

Just what do we have to do top get people to actually see us? Neon lights?

Safe riding mate.
 

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Riding motorcycles is a bit risky Lobo. The skill lies in mitigating this risk. We all learn to ride like they can't see us but getting pulled out in front of is still a major hazard. Best advice I can give aside from the chess game of not putting yourself in a position of being taken out which isn't always possible is...reaction time. The longer you give a negligent cager to react to your presence, the best success you (we) will have. The biggest mistake new motorcyclists make is not riding slow enough around cagers because they can't gage our speed properly due to size. Large trucks always appear to be driving faster than they really are and motorcycles slower. This is due to relative size. You have to compensate for the poor judgement of cagers is my best advice.
Ride safe everybody.
George
PS: Squids on sport bikes speeding through intersections is a sure recipe for disaster. I see it all the time. I alway downshift and ride 10 mph under the speed limit through intersections to let the inattentive cager make the best decision whether to turn or not. It is about reaction time which equates to the time window you subject yourself to the cager's decision. By contrast, I do not spare the rod on the open road however as I have a racer's heart :)
 

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Squids on sport bikes speeding through intersections is a sure recipe for disaster. I see it all the time. I alway downshift and ride 10 mph under the speed limit through intersections to let the inattentive cager make the best decision whether to turn or not. It is about reaction time which equates to the time window you subject yourself to the cager's decision. By contrast, I do not spare the rod on the open road however as I have a racer's heart
Sound advice for sure, George. However,around my area drivers are so ignorant and stupid that if you did reduce your speed by 10 mph below the limit at junctions and crossroads they'd assume you're letting them out! Usually, I maintain my speed, move further out towards the centre and cover the brake. :) Roundabouts though are different; sure, lower the speed, but you've still got to lean so hard braking is not such a viable option. :(

As for the squids :confused: spotted a couple on sports bikes a couple of days ago; stoppies at the lights and then wheelied on the green. Heavy traffic. Stupid! Get's the rest of us a bad name. :icon_drink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Slowing down to an extreme can be a problem as you say. The other thing is many endorse flashing their headlight to catch the attention of cagers but some construe that as right away as well.
There is no easy solution other than to ride until one's time is up. :cool:
Cheers brother,
George
 

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On your original question George, I believe you stick those little plates on. You could use some RTV silicone for the job - a spot of that will hold them fast, and you would still be able to dislodge them later if needs be.

British customs are helpful folks, PM sean at BC-twins and he will certainly answer your question on that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
On your original question George, I believe you stick those little plates on. You could use some RTV silicone for the job - a spot of that will hold them fast, and you would still be able to dislodge them later if needs be.

British customs are helpful folks, PM sean at BC-twins and he will certainly answer your question on that.
Thank you Prop. As always, I appreciate your advice.
George
 
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