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I plan on changing the front fork springs, add gators and seals. Local Triumph dealer quoted me 4 hours labor since I have the parts. Isn't that a bit high on the time side? Have thought of a purchase of a Sears jack and seal tool, would be cheaper.
 

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I just changed out the front springs yesterday on my T-100. Went with the Progressive set, and what a difference….also the sag measurements are now perfect as well.

So the easiest, way to do the springs & gators would be to remove the front wheel & fender, then loosen the triple clamp (top yoke) Allen bolts, and remove the fork caps (handle bars may need to be removed), then remove the bottom yoke bolt and slide the fork legs out. Once removed the fork oil is then drained and new oil added to correct measure height. The whole process can be done in 2-hours.

If you must change the seals, you will need to remove the Allen bolt at the bottom of the fork that holds the stansion to the fork leg, which will allow the fork stansion to slide up and out thus access to the fork seal; so figure another hour.

NOTE:

1) to install the new fork seals…..you either need to buy the proper tool (as you have planned to do) ….or take them to the Dealer...... as you will not be able to install the fork seals without a tool. A socket & hammer will not work! This will cost around $40.

2) purchase new copper washers for those bolts on the bottom of the forks....and make sure that the bolts are torqued to spec.... or fork fluid will leak out usually the next day after everything is put back together!!!


So unless you are looking to purchase that floor jack for future use, have sufficient skills & tools (torque wrench for sure), the time...4 hours labor is not really that much out of line.

Other than the fork seals, the job is easy and straight forward so have at it.
 

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There are a couple of threads on pulling the forks to fit gaiters in the great source of info sticky.

They don't show how to change the seal, but give you an idea anyway.

http://www.triumphrat.net/twins-technical-talk/91238-great-source-of-info.html

If you're going to change the seal, be advised that getting the allen bolt out of the bottom of the fork leg can be annoying - I ultimately invested in an air impact wrench to do it. It's not that it's tight, but once cracked it starts to spin, and holding the inner for damper can be a problem.

Also, I have changed seals in quite a few forks, and have found that by carefully using the old seal as a buffer, I can tap the new seals in place gradually and carefull with a hammer and piece of wood. Have to be VERY careful not to damage the fork leg though. The proper seal driver makes it a breeze though.
 

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Are your seals leaking?? If not, leave em be - I have 37,000 miles on a set in my Thrux with NO issues. Having taken apart 6 or so sets of Bonnie forks - they can range from very easy (not Likely though) to VERY difficult even with an impact wrench and a broom stick jambed in the damper rod. So if the seals are good I'd leave em in, and just swap springs and fill with new oil, and add the gaiters. Should be a hour or less with out the seal hassle. I made a fork seal driver out of a piece of PVC and used an old seal as a buffer - worked great for only a few bucks. Just take your time and make sure it's fully seated or getting the retaining clip back in is a PITA.
 

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Are your seals leaking?? If not, leave em be - I have 37,000 miles on a set in my Thrux with NO issues. Having taken apart 6 or so sets of Bonnie forks - they can range from very easy (not Likely though) to VERY difficult even with an impact wrench and a broom stick jambed in the damper rod. So if the seals are good I'd leave em in, and just swap springs and fill with new oil, and add the gaiters. Should be a hour or less with out the seal hassle. I made a fork seal driver out of a piece of PVC and used an old seal as a buffer - worked great for only a few bucks. Just take your time and make sure it's fully seated or getting the retaining clip back in is a PITA.
+1 on leaving the seals alone if they're not leaking. The rest of the operation is straightforward. Changing the seals probably added 90 minutes to two hours to the dealer's labor estimate, for the reasons listed in Thrux-ton-up's post.

Bob
 

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Posted a couple of years ago:

I made the following tool. Its a sort of vice to press the dampner rod to the bottom of the fork slide. The friction is enough to keep it from spinning when truning the nut

The device consists of 2 parallel treaded rods with a L shaped bars at the end. 1 bar is fixed, the other can slide by turning the 2 nuts. The fork is placed placed in between the treaded rods. The bottom of the fork sits against the L bar. I inserted a strong aluminium tube in the fork which sits at the top L bar. This tube is then pressed against the dampner rod by turning the screws at either side of the treaded rod. The dampner rod then pressed to the bottom of the forkslider and the bold holding it can be removed. I made a hole in the middle of the bottom bar the get an allen key through the the turn the bold holding the dampner rod. You can use flat steel bars but I went for L shape to prevent flexing. A bit over done because I did not need to tighten it that much. Easy to make cheep and most important it works like a dream.
 

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Nice inexpensive tool

I'm filing this away for future reference. Thanks.

Bob
 

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I used the following procedure to get my damping rod bolts out:

Remove forks from from bike and axle.

Pull the caps drain fluid (keep or reinstall the springs, washers and spacers).

The spring tension provided enough force on the damping rods to keep them from spinning and I was able to remove them by hand using a standard allen wrench.

IIRC, the factory maintenance manual actually tells you to crack these bolts prior to removing the springs...
 

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If you're going to go that far into the forks you might as well change out the emulators and damper to go along with the new springs for a total package on the front end. The reason for the dampers instead of your stock ones is that the emulators will have to be drilled PRECISELY, and the damper is tapered, to achieve the proper flow of oil. I bought the Traxxion Emulator kit w/dampers for a much less time consuming and proper fit. The front end will still have preload, the emulators will have adjustments too, diving under braking will be solved AND you can configure the front end to your weight and driving abilities. Duckman, Shiloh and myself did the total job in under 4 hours and its a lot easier to write about than to do, but it is doable. Just do one fork at a time to keep things in alignment. Talk with Dave since he's the master of front ends for racers and is quite knowledgeable of Triumphs.
http://traxxion.com/
 
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