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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In order to get rid of a leaking cap problem I seem to have drastically over tightened the right front resevoir screw. In order to untighten it I have now totally demolished the screw head. Its more like a cone shaped hole in the head at the moment.

I have tried to read up on the general undoing-of-stripped-screws-methods and I have found quite a few (on this forum and others). What would you say is the best method for this particular screw? I'm sure you never have done this kind of stupid thing :), but maybe you have some experience anyway?

Question two. Say that I do in fact get this screw out (although, in this moment of despair I cannot find room for that possibility in my mind) is that particular screw someting I can find in my local hard ware store or is it something extra special that is only found on Triumph bikes?
 

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I would try a left handed drill bit to back that screw out, or an ez out. Since this isn't a high-torque application with a big fastener it shouldn't be too difficult to get that screw out of there.

Take the screw, once it's out hopefully, to the hardware store and try to match it. I think the head might be countersunk into the cover of the reservoir though, and that might be difficult to find a match for.
 

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Screwed!

Use a very fine file, file a slot in the screw head, back it out with a flat bladed fine screwdriver.
any Ace hardware will have a replacement screw for you, take the old one in.
 

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I would drill the head off (no more than just the head), then remove the other screws and take off the cap. Put plastic wrap over the resevoir keep debris out and either file or use a dremmel to slot the top of the exposed screw shaft, then you can use a flat-head screw driver to take the screw out. It may also twist out just by using your fingers once the cap is off as there is no longer any torque on it.

Filing the screw head befor eremoving the cap is going to damage the finish on the cap and the counterbore that the screw head sits in.

The left hand drill bit is a good idea, but I thinks it's overkill for such an easy extraction.
 

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Make sure the screwdriver head is unworn and that it fits correctly on the screw head, no slack or slop, apply plenty of force towards the screw head to ensure intimate engagement.

A drop of valve grinding compound on the driver's tip stops it slipping out enabling much greater force to be applied.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Yep, since its countersunk any filing will be very risky. I will probably go with marc hannas drilling method. Seems that that will be least likely to cause any following problems (i.e. having to by a new cap). Ace hardeware stores are tricky to find around here, but thanks anyway kaifarm for the tip. I will try at the Swedish equivalent.

Are the resevoir screws metric or imperial? The only imperial ones I have come across this far are the banjo bolts, but maybe this one will be number two?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Final report

I'm sure you've been loosing sleep waiting for a report on the brake resevoir screw-(up)...

I went along with the drilling method using a 4mm drill at first and then a 5mm matching the screw diameter. I used a hand powered drill (mainly because I'm a coward). This probably meant 30 minutes extra work but it kept my nerves in order. I also used a magnet to collect the metal pieces. After drilling a little over 3 mm I could loosen the other screw and wiggle the lid until the drilled one snapped. Its is now replaced with a new one (which is 2 mm longer but the hole was deep enough for that).

The whole taking of the lid process started since brake fluid seemed to leak out. I wanted to clean the surfaces and dry them (someone on this forum wrote that dry surfaces where fundamnetal in making the Bonneville brake resevoir stop leaking). What I noticed was that the screw holes were half full of brake fluid (when trying out the new screw with the lid of). This started to come out of the hole when the screw pushed it out. That must have made it impossible for the sufaces to be dry when putting on the lid previously. I fixed that however and hope that the resevoir will not be leaking anymore.

If any of you were interested...
 

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I'm glad it worked out well for you. Is the leak fixed now? Over tightening is never the cure for a bad seal. Also, it's a good idea to use proper sized screwdrivers and ones that aren't worn to prevent this from happening again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The leak appears to be fixed. Will see over time if it starts to leak again. Might have to replace the rubber thing and maybe the cap in that case. Hopefully not. I'm also replacing the phillips screws with allens. Thanks again!
 
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