Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my Friday was going ok until just after lunch I thought I'd head home and let my dogs out and hurry back to work. Lesson 1: Don't hurry anywhere when you're riding.

Anyway, I'm in a double left turn lane on the inside lane when all of the sudden everyone in the long line of cars stops dead. I apply my brakes (I think brakes plural but, I'm not sure) and suddenly I'm on the ground and looking through my helmet at my bike 10 feet in front of me also on the ground. It happened so utterly instantaneously that I didn't have anytime to put out a hand or an elbow or even know it was happening. My shoulder took all the impact of the pavement and also hit my helmet. Lesson 2: always wear a helmet.

The only thing I can imagine is that there was some of that road scrunge that exists in the middle of intersections (gravel, dirt, sand, old blinkers,etc.) and that my front tire thought it was on ice and acted appropriately. Lesson 3: I think I know now why these trailwing tires have the nickname of deathwings.

Seeing my bike on the ground just made me pissed off so, with adrenaline pumping through my veins, I just grabbed it up off the ground. Then feeling a great big pop and some searing pain in my shoulder, I got it upright. Thankfully two guys ran over and helped me get the bike out of the intersection. Lesson 4: Maybe let somebody else pick up your bike? :) I was in a haze because I told the guys I couldn't get it in neutral because the shifter was broken off. He said, just pull in the clutch. Oh yeah that works.

So, I get to the side of the road and rip my helmet and jacket off to more pain. Lesson 5: Maybe don't do all these gyrations after an accident. I think I did more damage to my shoulder grabbing my bike up and undressing on the side of the road than the accident itself. I call my boss and tell him I won't be back for the 1:30 meeting, I limp the bike home and then call my wife. Lesson 6: no matter how you phrase it, the message that you wrecked your bike doesn't sit will with the wife. Plus, calling my boss first instead of her...oh boy.

So, now I'm thankful that all that is wrong with me is a bruised up shoulder and a cracked rib and all that's wrong with the Scrambler is some scratches, the bars at a weird angle, and a broken shifter arm. It's going to the dealer today for a checkup AND SOME NEW TIRES!

My question to the group is ... how do I convince my wife that I can go back to riding? She's freaked.

At least over the weekend I got her from right out selling the bike to riding only in the neighborhood. I guess it's just going to take time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
You may have slipped on a painted line or arrow in your lane. Those things are paint on top of plastic and can be very slippery, even in dry conditions. I treat them like a big oil slick.

Thank God you are alright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,038 Posts
Von, glad you and the bike only had minor damage. These expierances are life's little lessons. Let your wife know that today you are a more confident, skilled rider than you were on Friday so she has LESS to worry about. Glad you are OK.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,585 Posts
Von, glad you and the bike only had minor damage. These expierances are life's little lessons. Let your wife know that today you are a more confident, skilled rider than you were on Friday so she has LESS to worry about. Glad you are OK.
+1

"Experience" is the sum of all the bits you got wrong. If you've never done anything wrong, you won't have learned how to avoid it next time. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Glad to hear you came out of this with less than serious injuries. My wife is constanly hearing the crash stories, especially since we had a friend killed by a drunk driver a few weeks ago. I like the comment of being more experienced now, as it is the skills you already have may have prevented this one from being worse.

Just for the record, I just put new Metzlers on my America. I love 'em! I think the term would be "soft and sticky". I have the Lazertec on the front and the 880 on the back.
I highly recommend them.
Good Luck, Be Safe!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
30,406 Posts
Glad you're OK man, that's the main thing.

Take it easy, heal, and everything will start to come back together again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the well wishes. I know what I was doing...I was pushing it. And thinking how little time i had to go let out my dogs at home and get back to the office. I wasn't 'present' with the here and now and I was right on that guy's back bumper and not looking ahead. More experienced? Yes. It was a wake up call. I'm just glad the guy behind me didn't run me over in the street while I was all stunned and stupid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Lesson 1: Don't hurry anywhere when you're riding.
True. True. That lesson is typically the deciding factor when I walk outside to go somewhere. If I'm in a rush, I usually take the cage.

Glad you are okay dude. Good luck with the wife thing. Just talk incessantly about how much you like to ride. I'm sure she will cave. Can you tell I'm not married? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
been there..but I was 4 hours from home in the back country when it happened.

the wife was so stressed from the situation, she spent the time while I was driving home in a rental car shopping for shoes on the internet.

I told her she could keep the shoes if I could get a new bike.

2 weeks later I got a new bike.

leads to a new question:
should I stop riding when we have our first child sometime next year?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
should I stop riding when we have our first child sometime next year?
ahhh. the old "risk" question. taking risks changes as your life changes. only you can decide if you are willing to maintain your current level of risk once your spawn arrives.

of course, you could get hit by a bus without getting on a bike...i guess just being ALIVE has certain risks.

motorcycling aside, i would suggest a living will and a life insurance policy to guide your family in the event that you can't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Woof. That's rough. I'm glad you're okay.

The key to getting back on the bike is admitting that you screwed up and how (in my opinion, being distracted is more of a problem than being in a hurry) and presenting this as an opportunity to improve. Your wife almost certainly sees this as a dangerous optional activity. You need to cut down on both the "dangerous" and the "optional" to get her to go along with you getting back on the bike.

I will give no more advice on the situation, since no sane person would take advice from me for anything involving women.

+1 on you hitting some road paint. Even in the dry, that stuff can be slick.

There's nothing wrong with lifting your bike after a drop or a wreck, but definitely don't do it all He-Man style, and give yourself a few seconds to cool off and think. I've been down on two bikes. Took my time with the second one, and everything went a lot better.

When I'm riding in heavy traffic, even though lane-splitting is illegal in Virginia, as soon as I see brake lights I move to either the extreme left or right edge of the lane, preferably the side with less car blocking it. I started doing that in preparation for lane changes, but after sailing by a car that had somehow dropped about 30 mph while I was checking my blind spot once, I decided that it may not be such a bad strategy in general. Even if it only gives me an few feet, that can be the difference between looking like an idiot and having to replace a fork. Of course, it's better to leave space to stop and all, but in really heavy traffic, that space is an invitation to be cut-off, and I find that there's often too much going on around me to be completely aware of absolutely everything that's happening, try though I might.

Anyway, I hope you get off without too much in the way of repairs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,528 Posts
I went through this after my getoff back in Austria in the spring of '07. The minute I heard comments about "you won't be riding any more," I answered clearly, forcefully, and calmly. "Yes I will." Make it clear from the beginning that doing an accident doesn't make motorcycling any less important to you.

As for kids, that's your call. Obviously lots of people feel it's an acceptable risk, and there's no telling how many don't feel the risk is acceptable. We motorcyclists can't all be childless orphans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
915 Posts
Von:
Glad that you're (relatively) OK. Tell your wife that you now have good judgment. "Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from poor judgment." (I'm not saying that you used poor judgment; its just a nice quote). Your wife may have been involved in (or at least witnessed the occurrence of or the after-effects of) a motor vehicle accident, but I'll bet that she continues to drive a car. In some respects, safety is just an illusion. Tell her that life is more than risk reduction - otherwise, we'd never get out of bed in the morning. Get back on that horse and ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Von:
Get back on that horse and ride.
I will. I will after I get some new tires! I think the Metzeler Tourances are needed. I think the trailwings (with 5500 miles) have something to do with the front end slipping instantly away. At least i told the wife that. I told her they had a nickname of 'deathwings'. Her response was classic "you mean you knew you were riding around on tires with the nickname of deathwings?" Don't you hate it when they phrase things like that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
vonroll - glad you and the Scrammie didn't get too banged up. A couple of weeks ago before the time change, I hit a deer while driving to work on 45 in the Circle C area, and my wife gave me the "I hate to say it, but" talk about what would've happened if I'd been on the Scrambler I'm looking to buy instead of the car. Since I live where there are a lot of deer this made me think I probably just won't ride when it's dark. This may mean 6-8 weeks per year of not being able to commute on the bike regardless of how nice it is, but it'll be worth it if both my wife and myself have better peace of mind.

I agree with the guys who see riding as a calculated risk, as that's pretty much how I feel every time I get on my bicycle. I think you can just be as careful and responsible as possible and not let fear get the better of you.

Keep us posted on what tires you end up with and what you think of them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I told her they had a nickname of 'deathwings'. Her response was classic "you mean you knew you were riding around on tires with the nickname of deathwings?" Don't you hate it when they phrase things like that?
Too funny! Gosh that sounds like my wife. I think they're just hard wired to react that way. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
I told her they had a nickname of 'deathwings'. Her response was classic "you mean you knew you were riding around on tires with the nickname of deathwings?" Don't you hate it when they phrase things like that?
I don't know if it'll help your case, but the "Deathwings" nickname comes a lot from their tendency to wash out on gravel. If you think they're poorly suited to street use, you'd be amazed at how poorly they're suited to mud or gravel. I'm still riding mine, but by all accounts the Tourances are stickier on the road, and that's where most of our bikes spend most of their time.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top