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Discussion Starter #1
I need to remove my rear tire from my '09 Spoked Bonnie.

Anybody want to kill some time by giving me some step by step instructions on rear wheel removal/installation? I'm going to get a manual once it's out.

Thanks all.
 

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Hopefully, I remember all the steps. Someone else please chime in if I forget anything.

Put the bike up on the center stand or lift. You might have trouble pulling the wheel out if it's on the center stand. Put a support under the rear wheel so that the wheel will rest on it.

Remove the two brake caliper mounting bolts and pull the caliper out of the way. Put a thin piece of wood between the pistons and don't lean on the brake lever while you have it off. Don't disconnect the hydraulic line. This is a good time to check your brake pads.

Write down (or remember) the position of the chain adjusters for re-assembly. Then loosen them all the way.

Remove the rear axle nut. You'll need 24mm for the nut and 19mm for the left side of the axle bolt.

Knock out the axle bolt, supporting the wheel. When it all comes apart, pay attention to the orientation and sides of the spacers; write it down if you must.

Maneuver the chain off the sprocket. It might help to remove the chain guard.

Pull the wheel out. You might have to loosen the fender if the bike is on the center stand. Use a marker to draw a big arrow on the rim to show the direction the wheel turns. You can remove the marker later with acetone on a paper towel, but keep the acetone off the tire.

When you get the wheel back, make sure that the tire is installed in the proper direction. The arrow on the tire should match the direction of wheel rotation.

When re-assembling--after putting the chain over the sprocket, support the rear wheel at the position it should be to insert the axle bolt. Insert a piece of dowel, a drift, a socket extension, or whatever else you have handy from the right to hold the various parts in place, then drive in the axle bolt from the left side. This can be a tedious operation if you haven't done it before.

You must get all the parts properly in place. Pay special attention to the spacers. There's only one correct way to put it together.

You'll need to go through the chain adjustment process, hopefully you know the routine for that. Use your previous settings as a starting point, aim for about 30mm (1¼ inches) of slack.

If you can get a 24mm socket over the axle bolt--depending on silencer placement and whether you've taken the silencer off--use a six-point (i.e. impact) socket if possible.

Put the brake caliper back on and test the brake. If it doesn't seem to fit correctly, you might have reversed the spacers, time to pull it apart and start over.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the Info

Marty,

Thanks for the info.

I'm taking off the silencers. Any tricks to taking them off and/or putting them on?

Kurt
 

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Silencers

Marty,

Thanks for the info.

I'm taking off the silencers. Any tricks to taking them off and/or putting them on?

Kurt
Leave the brackets on the silencers, and remove the bracket via the footpeg mount, because the threads in the silencer can work loose and make it hard to tighten and/or remove the screws--best to just leave it alone.

When you re-install the clamp at the header end, smear some hi-temp RTV silicone sealant on the joint to seal it.
 

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Shop Manual

If you are going to be doing repairs on your bike I highly recomend buying the shop manual. It will save you A LOT of pain and agony.

A
 

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Once you have that rear tyre repaired, fit a mud flap on the bottom of the front mudguard, it'll reduce rear wheel punctures by around 90%.

Hey PieMan,

Would you please expand on this? Why does a mud flap on the bottom of the front fender prevent rear flats? Just curious...

Thanks a bunch,

Joel
 

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Hi Joel, I discovered this in the Eighties while despatch riding in London. I used to get a couple of rear punctures a month, after fitting a front mud flap to stop the crap hitting the engine, my puncture rate went down to a couple of times a year.

I think it's got something to do with the way the front tyre flicks up nails and the like with perfect timing for the rear to drive over them and puncture. I've used a mud flap on every classic styled bike I've had since then, the last time I had a puncture was sometime in the Nineties.

I know it sounds unlikely, but it works. :)
 

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PieMan,

Thanks for the quick reply. If it work, then it works. I think a nice leather mud flap (sans studs) would look quite nice.

Thanks again,

Joel
 
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