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Discussion Starter #1
I'd really like to firm up the feel of the front end on my '08 T100.
Specifically; it is a bit too easy for the front end to change directions, either at my command, or because of some uneven road surface.
I had planned (later) to add the fork brace, progressive springs, different shocks, etc, but really think that either the fork brace and/or the steering damper will get me closer to the desired result quicker.
Does anyone have experience with either of these add-ons who can give some guidance here?
The cost of the fork brace (for use with gaitors) and the steering damper is close enough to be a wash.
Bob
 

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Choice

Id do the fork brace w/ progressive springs! Handling wise- I think it will give you nice firm dependable response?
 

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Over time I have done all 4 - better tyres, fork brace, progressive springs and a steering damper. The first mod that I installed was the steering damper and the benefits in terms of increaed confidence was obvious. However with a T100, the steering damper is probably less needed unless you have drop/cafe bars like what is found on the Thruxton. The fork brace did make highway travel around the bay area more enjoyable as the front tyre tracked better over the rain grooves. However, make sure you spend time installing the fork brace properly otherwise it will impact the "fork sliding action" (there is a technical term for what I am trying to say here but have forgotten). The progressive springs reduced front end dive when braking and helped stability when hitting bumps mid corner. IMHO: springs 1, good tyres 2, brace 3 and damper 4. Note that my riding conditions and style will be different to others
 

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To me, all four are needed, since each adds a distinct improvement over the entire riding cycle. Myself I noticed something very strange on the ride home when I hit a series of banked esses on the farm to market roads at high speeds. When I looked at the forks while going through the curves, the inside fork for which ever side going through the curve, was actually sitting back ever so slightly, instead of parallel with each other. The g-forces worked on the tubes more than I expected. After the fork brace, which was more important to me at the moment, did its job and stabilized the ride. But after each mod the ride became more stable ESPECIALLY after the tires. So for me its 1. the brace, 2. the tires, 3. the overhaul of the front forks, and 4. the steering stabilizer.
 

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Handling

Looks like we all are in agreement on this one!! as far as #1-4 goes! I forgot tires when I read the post. I got that funny uneven wobble/twist/ bump thing. A brace is commin now!
Gotta love the handling of these bikes! The old Bonne's werent near as good. Goes to show- you can teach an old dog- new tricks! I just hope they dont run the legend into the ground to make $$! The 2nd Gen Bonne's are what the 1st shoulda evolved into back then, but they had their $$ problems then as do us all rite now. When I get too old to ride- my Bonne will become an ornament in my living room unless my son wants to cherish her as have I!
 

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+1 for tyres
If your front tyre is worn a new one will make a noticable improvement to handling.
If you have already fitted a new tyre, or the existing one is not worn, check your pressures also.
I run my bonnie at 38-40 psi front and rear.
I recommend installing better springs in the forks as a first option to improve the front end.
I installed Ikon fork springs and also Ikon shocks, made a big improvement to the way the bike handles.
Cheers
Pete
 

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My $.02c worth.
Changing direction too quickly when you input control and changing when you hit a bump are two different things.
A. The quickness of steering is down to the geometry of the motorcycle. If it appears to steer too quickly it may be because you are used to a cruiser or a touring (BMW?) motorcycle. Both these type of 'bikes are designed from the factory to be stable and take a little more effort to deviate from a straight line. The Bonneville is a lighter more nimble beast. The Thruxton is even more nimble, smaller frt wheel and longer rear shoclks speed up the steering.You could drop the frt forks a little to lift the frt end, that would slow it down a tad. I'm assuming that as a 08 you bought it new and that a previous owner hasn't dropped the frt.
B. The suspension as from the factory is "O.K" but easily improved. My T100 was pretty interesting on the frost heaved roads around here but new frt springs changed all that. I added emulaters and rear shocks while I was at it but personaly I think that frt progressive springs would be the first thing to do. Rear shocks next then a fork brace. A steering dampener would be a bonus once the other stuff is done. As mentioned, a worn tyre seems to be quite noticable on these bike but I found it more of a weave or follow the tram lines thing.
Let us know how it works out.
 

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Fitted to my Thruxton:-

1. Hyde Fork Brace: Huge improvement in front end stability.
2. Hyde Steering Damper: Stops the forks flapping, even at the minimum setting.
3. Tyres (Avon Azaro): More grip, neutral handling, highly recommended.
4. Progressive spings: I see no reason to replace my fork springs.
5. Rear suspension: Ikons far superior to the inadequate standard units.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Additional info

Just for reference, I did 10 years on a '98 Thunderbird, followed by 5 months on a new Harley Softtail "Crossbones", which had a springer front end, and then directly to the '08 T100.
I'm certain that the Harley time impacted my perceptions on the handling issue, but I don't recall my old T-bird being this "twitchy".
Before the T-bird, I had 7 BMW's in a row (4 of the 800's, and 3-1000's).
Prior to that, I've owned more motorcycles than any large family of people really needs for a lifetime. I've lost the exact count over the last 45 years of riding and racing.
I most certainly AM trying to get back a bit of the solid, "planted" feel of the bigger, heavier bike without taking a licking on my new T-100 (just over 100 miles total on the bike to date) to buy a new 2009 Road King (which is a VAST improvement over any prior FLH frame Harley).
Yes, I know as well as the next guy that you can't make one bike do everything perfectly, and that I'm going to dump a LOT of $$$ and end up with a compromise no matter what.
But, logic suggests to me that the steering damper should stop the "twitch", and the fork brace the mid-corner vagueness.
The tires are (obviously) new, and I hadn't changed the inflation past the suggested 33 front/38 rear setting.
On my T-bird, I had great results running both ends at 36 psi, something I learned from the city maintenance guys who service the Harley cop bikes. I've done that pressure on several bikes now with good result, and really do suspect that 33 lbs is a bit light on the front, and could well be a contributor to what I'm seeing.
Thanks to all for the great inputs!
When the darned weather gives us a break, I'll air up the tires and take a close look at the pre-load on the headset bearings, and go from there.
As for replacement tires, I'll probably go with the Marathons, a hold-over from my Beemer days!:)
Bob
My $.02c worth.
Changing direction too quickly when you input control and changing when you hit a bump are two different things.
A. The quickness of steering is down to the geometry of the motorcycle. If it appears to steer too quickly it may be because you are used to a cruiser or a touring (BMW?) motorcycle. Both these type of 'bikes are designed from the factory to be stable and take a little more effort to deviate from a straight line. The Bonneville is a lighter more nimble beast. The Thruxton is even more nimble, smaller frt wheel and longer rear shoclks speed up the steering.You could drop the frt forks a little to lift the frt end, that would slow it down a tad. I'm assuming that as a 08 you bought it new and that a previous owner hasn't dropped the frt.
B. The suspension as from the factory is "O.K" but easily improved. My T100 was pretty interesting on the frost heaved roads around here but new frt springs changed all that. I added emulaters and rear shocks while I was at it but personaly I think that frt progressive springs would be the first thing to do. Rear shocks next then a fork brace. A steering dampener would be a bonus once the other stuff is done. As mentioned, a worn tyre seems to be quite noticable on these bike but I found it more of a weave or follow the tram lines thing.
Let us know how it works out.
 

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Just for reference, I did 10 years on a '98 Thunderbird, followed by 5 months on a new Harley Softtail "Crossbones", which had a springer front end, and then directly to the '08 T100.
I'm certain that the Harley time impacted my perceptions on the handling issue, but I don't recall my old T-bird being this "twitchy".
Before the T-bird, I had 7 BMW's in a row (4 of the 800's, and 3-1000's).
Prior to that, I've owned more motorcycles than any large family of people really needs for a lifetime. I've lost the exact count over the last 45 years of riding and racing.
I most certainly AM trying to get back a bit of the solid, "planted" feel of the bigger, heavier bike without taking a licking on my new T-100 (just over 100 miles total on the bike to date) to buy a new 2009 Road King (which is a VAST improvement over any prior FLH frame Harley).
Yes, I know as well as the next guy that you can't make one bike do everything perfectly, and that I'm going to dump a LOT of $$$ and end up with a compromise no matter what.
But, logic suggests to me that the steering damper should stop the "twitch", and the fork brace the mid-corner vagueness.
The tires are (obviously) new, and I hadn't changed the inflation past the suggested 33 front/38 rear setting.
On my T-bird, I had great results running both ends at 36 psi, something I learned from the city maintenance guys who service the Harley cop bikes. I've done that pressure on several bikes now with good result, and really do suspect that 33 lbs is a bit light on the front, and could well be a contributor to what I'm seeing.
Thanks to all for the great inputs!
When the darned weather gives us a break, I'll air up the tires and take a close look at the pre-load on the headset bearings, and go from there.
As for replacement tires, I'll probably go with the Marathons, a hold-over from my Beemer days!:)
Bob
Looks like you've got enough miles under your belt to figure it out Bob

.The weather up here doesn't "break" until May 2009 so I am exceedingly jealous.
 

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Hi Guys, I have a 2013 Triumph Thruxton , mileage 1700
I am not sure about the slightly twitchy front end, I am Not talking at speed hear but more when just slow cruising, on different days when first setting off I have even stopped a couple of times to check that the front tyre for air, it just has a bit of a loose wobbly feel, especially on slow corners & traffic islands, it seems better when moving quicker ...anyone any ideas what it might be, & how i can sort it ?

Fitted British Customs mods, preditors cans,K&N Air Filter, Arrow 2into 2 map,SAI removed, Ikon rear springs

Cheers
 

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I have a 2014 thrux with a "nervous" front end as well. I changed to progressive fork springs and 5w fork oil which helped the ride a lot but I still feel the front end could hold its line better. I will have a better idea as I put on some kms but if I cannot adjust it to run straighter I am considering a fork brace and/or dropping rear shock length/raising front forks.
 

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I have a '05 Thrux. I don't feel the need for either. I do have stiffer springs and a change of oil wgt. I ride briskly on the back roads and a bit of flex or movement doesn't cause an alarm to go off. Not dismissing the idea, but I don't have a nervous front end on decent roads. I do have a damper on my 955 Daytona.
 
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