Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I bought a new Yamaha clutch cable a few months ago, but when it arrived I was waiting for a check to replace my rashed up Pazzo so I didn't put it on. Then, a couple weeks ago, I had planned to install it with the new engine. That took a lot longer than intended, though, and besides, why replace a cable that looks like this?





Well, here's why...



Can anyone explain to me what, exactly, the brain-dead engineer at Triumph who put that bend in the cable was thinking?
Failed right at the bend, no question:


I am not real happy with the routing of the Yamaha cable, but it sure beats the Triumph one! The Yamaha one seems a little short, mostly due to my USD forks.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
I went through a similar experience when the clutch cable broke on my 99ST.

I was surprised at how much gunk got into the cable and the points at which it suffers stress and wears.

Now I know these cables are teflon coated and as such should not require any additional lubrication. However, seeing where and how my broken cable suffered, there is some deficiency evident.

There are lubricants that will react with and/or degrade the teflon. Its a good idea to stay well away from them.

For my current clutch cable I have used liquid lanolin and so far, so good. I'm not getting the gathering of gunk at either end of the outer sheath and the action is still nice and smooth.

If and when it eventually fails, I plan on cutting it open to see what has happened inside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,610 Posts
Yea, it looks like the perch and lever were allowed to hang loose from the bars at one time or another and twisted or kinked at the transition point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
BTW Kit, you can ask the same question concerning the spoked wheels Triumph uses.

Anyone that owned a Bonnie, Scrambler, Thruxton will have stories to tell.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
FYI, the motor end, at least, of the Yamaha cable had what appeared to be graphite-based grease on it from the factory.

The clutch cable before this last one, I lubed with Teflon lube when it got stiff. I think it bought me an extra 500 miles or so, but when that liner is done it's pretty well done.

As far as spoked wheels go, I feel the same way about them that I do about drum brakes and points and 3" wide tires...

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
i had the same problem but not any more .. im using a klr 650 cable ..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Can either of you guys measure your outer cables? I wonder if one of those wouldn't be a better fit than the Yamaha Warrior cable I have now...

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,089 Posts
Can either of you guys measure your outer cables? I wonder if one of those wouldn't be a better fit than the Yamaha Warrior cable I have now...

Cheers,
-Kit
I installed a set of LSLs and love them but the cable is about $60 to replace, can you give me the part/model number of the alternatives Yam/Kawa cables, it needs to be longer than stock. Many thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Damn Kit! Here I thought I was the Schleprock of all time! Not anymore! :eek:

That's interesting info Beach, I didn't know there were cable lubes that would negatively effect the Teflon, that stuff is so inert to most chemicals that it comes as a big surprise to me. I have to check that out more.

This cable design has me curious as well about when it will fail. Just like Kit I have stared at the elbow and thought "why?", long radius bends aren't going to stress the cable and so what if it loops around a bit.

I have the 08 bars on my 01 and since I got it from the PO that way, I'm not sure who's cable is on there but I'm pretty sure it is off of a later year Sprint as he was big on using Triumph dealers for parts.

Is there a prior listing somewhere of what cables will work even on my 01 with later year bars? Maybe I need to see a stock 01's cable to compare with what I have on there now. Sorry Kit but I don't want to join you on this one anytime soon! ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
See the listing here for some non-Triumph cables:

http://www.triumphrat.net/blogs/triumph-technical-data-2/sprint-st-aftermarket-part-numbers-31/

The Yamaha Warrior cable with "26355" in the model name is probably too short to work on anything but an RS or maybe a pre-'05 ST with stock bars. USD forks do not play nicely with it.

As far as the Teflon lining goes, it's not the chemicals in the lube that destroy it. Sticky lubes attract and hold grit that physically destroys the Teflon tube; dust particles that would otherwise pass through the cable housing are held in place by the lube.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Thanks Kit, I'll look into that this winter. Might pull the cable this winter and start doing some research with one of the friendly local shops.

The grit issue makes sense but I thought he said it was a chemical reaction of the lube with the Teflon? In my business Teflon has only shown reaction to fluorine and halogenated organic chemicals, not something you should find in lubricants. Maybe the coating/sleeve isn't PTFE but some other hybrid Teflon. Not the point here really, just had me curious, best of luck on finding a better replacement cable. I know I'm going to be packing a spare in the bike after this season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Thanks Kit, I'll look into that this winter. Might pull the cable this winter and start doing some research with one of the friendly local shops.

The grit issue makes sense but I thought he said it was a chemical reaction of the lube with the Teflon? In my business Teflon has only shown reaction to fluorine and halogenated organic chemicals, not something you should find in lubricants. Maybe the coating/sleeve isn't PTFE but some other hybrid Teflon. Not the point here really, just had me curious, best of luck on finding a better replacement cable. I know I'm going to be packing a spare in the bike after this season.
Its a topic thats been argued before. Some are adamant that nothing should be added where teflon is used as its unnecessary and some things can react with it.

Like you I am unaware of such things, but I shall not dismiss the experience of others and will happily defer to greater knowledge.

As mentioned, I use liquid lanolin in my clutch cable, with good results. I also use this to lube my chain, with good results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
Not having a hydraulic clutch was one of the negatives when I was looking at the bike as a potential buy. Some hate them but I like a hydraulic clutch, a well designed unit simply doesn't fail if you flush and fill on a regular basis. I do that to my brake systems so no big deal doing it for the clutch!

I'll look into the lanolin stuff, thanks Beach! Never hurts to look at what works for others even if I haven't had one fail yet (bike is pretty new to me anyway). The clutch on mine kills my hand after a day in the twisty's even with the faux-pazzo's. Doesn't feel like it is binding but neither did the last throttle cable that snapped on another bike of mine.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I'll try to remember to add to the list in a bit, but for now here's this:

Looks like the Yamaha Warrior cable housing is about 39" long, the Triumph is 43" long, and a KLR 650 cable is 47". (All measurements are housing only, not cable length.)

I'll be trying a KLR cable ASAP...

Cheers,
-Kit
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I am now running with an old style KLR-650 cable. I think the new style, which is just a couple of inches short and doesn't have the steel bend near the lever, would be a better choice, but this one seems fine. The bend near the lever seems much less likely to cause problems than the Triumph cable's bend down by the clutch.

Cheers,
-Kit
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top