Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of September's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was headed to Charleston, SC yesterday. Its about a 275 mile trip. While on one strech of really desolate road, I noticed the rear end got real squishy. Looked back and yep, flat rear.
Luckily I had a friend that lives about 25 miles from where I stopped. he picked me and the bike up in the truck and today I got it to a Honda dealer (no triumph dealer around). They charged me $100!!! I was pissed.

Anyway, would it be worth learning to fix a flat tire myself rather than paying someone out the Ass to do it for me. How hard is it really? Does that Fix-a-Flat stuff work with tubed tires???

-Gray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
My last flat--back tire--cost $90+ to fix. And I had to take it back because the mechanic mounted the tire backwards. I think that the sprocket on the "wrong" side confused him. It was a expensive, but at that point I didn't feel like dealing with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Gray -

Fixaflat doesn't work, the tube usually tears.. as far as the do it yourself approach, It requires Tire Irons, rim protection, and maybe a bead breaker as the beads are quite stout.

I take my wheels to a local Indy shop, If I buy the tire from them the mouting and balance is free otherwise $25.00

$90.00 - $100.00 doesn't sound unreasonable, they had to remove the rear wheel, fix or replace the tube, and re-install the rear wheel.

Next time remove the wheel yourself. easy if you have a center-stand or bike lift. Save 2/3 the cost right there.


[ This message was edited by: CYNCRZR on 2007-02-23 18:34 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
There is a conversion for mountain bike wheels (www.notubes.com) but not for motorbikes. I have used it on my mtn bike for years, guess the same technology would work. Kinda messy though, uses something like "slime" to seal the micro holes in the tire.

Changing the tube is not really that hard, I had a flat a few months back and broke out the tire irons and once the new tube was in hand it took less than 30 minutes. Just be carefull not to damage the chrome. I cut up a thin cutting board sheet and placed the peices between the tire iron and rim. You will need three irons to do the job. Another set of hands helps and don't forget to unseat the tire on both sides all the way around. Use some soapy water and do it.

Oh yeah, be careful to noto pinch the tube, then again they only cost about $12.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Could someone please give me the rundown of the tools i'd need to change a tube on the road...I dont have a centerstand, so i'm guessing it would be pretty tricky.

-Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
On 2007-02-23 22:16, GrayMitchell wrote:
Anybody know if the wheels can be sealed and converted to tubeless?
Ran into a fellow at Barber on a spoke-wheel Tiger. He sealed his spoke nipples with Goop, installed a stem, had 5000 miles with no problems. Said he cleaned rim real good, 2 applications of Goop letting it dry overnight between coats. Someone else (I think on BA.com) used silicone caulk. Only thing is, seal may be broken when truing wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Fixing a flat on the road without a center stand, pretty tough!

You need a 8mm, 19mm, and 24mm wrenches or sockets.
3 tires irons, something to break the bead with, a bead breaker or large C clamp, soapy water & either a patch kit or new tube.

On a road trip, I'd use Visa, even with a center stand takin all them tools along would hinder the experience for me.

Buchanan's in so-cal has a process to seal spoked wheels so you can go tubeless, I have a buddy who's done it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Try cruising trough Europe: in 1K miles I can cross four or five borders. When I reach Poland, Italy, Sweden or whatever I like to be able to fix my own flats; never had to leave the bike behind ( OK, they stole my Legend last year in Chzechia ) in case of a breakdown. Tools needed are not that difficult to take along, or to buy or loan if needed. Never said it is easy to do!

Thieu :-D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
European picetags: If you take a tubeless tire in for repair ( wheel taken out) it'll cost you 20$ (15€) for a repair (plug insert from the inside out )..IF you find the right shop! As for a 100$ repair: a rear tire for a speed triple ( my son's ) costed 265$... :???:

This is Belgium...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,050 Posts
Ja, België is duur. Belgium is expensive. It's not hard to do the job yourself, just dirty and tedious to wrestle the tire off and back on the rim, and you risk scratching it. If I ever do it again, I'll buy rim protectors. I also have three large tire irons. The little ones just don't do it, and just two of them don't do it either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts


Marty,
I use these; didn't scratch the alu rim of my former bike,easy to pack too.

Thieu. BTW, congrats on your flemish!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
G'day Gray.
The tyre Fix-a-Flat will work!!.I have used it and carry it every where I go.If I was you and worried about flats,and you are going to ride away from civilisation,do your self a favour.Buy some tyre leavers,a pump(a good,repeat,good push bike pump will work OK)and a patch kit+a new tube.Make or buy a small stand that will prop the bike over onto the side stand.Then go for it.Do the remove,install routine at least twice,with a bit of luck you will pinch the tube and then you will know how to fix it as well.If you stuff up bad you have a spare tube for some one to do for you.Carry and use liquid soap to help break and set the bead.You CAN do it,Its no big deal,tho busting the bead can give you the s***s at times.
In the Oz outback you fix em or you could have a very long wait.
Go do it. Bloody hell,I forgot about tools but thats common sense anyway. All the best. Macca.
:upthumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Yikes, my first rear flat was about 4 weeks ago. Mine was fixed by RPM here in Dallas for something in the $30's, I remember the new tube being about $12.

I took my rear tire off myself and took it to them, which might have saved some $$ though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
If all else fails bring plastic.

I paid $30 something to have a tube replaced when I handed the shop guys the rim/tire off the bike.

If your long term goal is "roadside flat repair" .... start by learning to do it at home first. Take your rim off the bike and into the shop for the next tire replacement or repair. After you're comfortable with that,.. bite the bullet, buy the tools listed above / or others and go for it.

There are some tricks but.....how about some trivia...I understand Steve McQueen was doing it in 5 minutes or so? (very quick) when he trained for the International Six Day Trials back in the sixties. You should be able to do it.

Check the FSSNOC website (four stroke single cylinder national owners) what a name.... presidents page reported changing a flat rear and getting back on the road in about an hour and a half.

Some folks with a credit card spend most of a day calling tow trucks etc.

Good goal.. just take it a step at a time.

Mike :)
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top