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Discussion Starter #1
So it happened about 3 miles into a ride away from the dealer on a brand new T100 Bonnie. Prior to, my riding experience has been about 6,000 miles on sport bikes within the last year, so I am still a fairly new rider. Pretty shocking wake up call on how easily you can F-up on the street. Happened during a turn through an intersection at maybe 20 mph. Flicked the bike over with more lean angle than necessary (but still short of peg scraping), and just as everything was stabilized through the corner (stable lean, not accelerating/rolling on, or braking) faster than you can blink the bike lowsided and we were on the ground sliding to a stop. I was wearing full gear, so not a scratch on me. The bike on the other hand....

Re-visited the location after it happened and have been on a mental loop thinking about the factors since. I think a few things - new bike, different style of bike, non scrubbed tires, non-sport tires, momentary loss of focus, and a thicker than normal trail of oil build up through the center section of pavement. Looking at the scar on the pavement, it went down right at the edge of the oil buildup. This was the last intersection before the entrance to a farmers market, so maybe lots of trucks over years dropping more oil/fluids than normal. There was no debris, sand or gravel on the pavement. I've always been more focused on looking for debris while cornering than oil build up. Lesson learned there.

I've had new tires installed four times on other bikes, and always very aware and careful of the scrub in process. I was deliberately taking this ride very easy until I came to the intersection and was waiting to turn. For some reason in that short moment as I pulled out, I reverted back to how I may have treated the other bikes I've been on and never had issues with. Didn't feel like I was really taking the corner all that aggressively, as I really don't do that at intersections. I've always saved that for back roads and clean pavement that I've scoped out first.

Anyway, just a little rattled by how unexpected and quickly this happened. Not really sure what the most important factor was. I've experienced little slides through corners before on very small patches of sand, gravel, and leaves, but just held it steady and the bike just did a tiny slide and went on its way. Pretty shocking how this was just instant and total - no initial slide, just bang and down. Will have to be more careful on my other bike as well.

I bought this bike because it looks cool and wanted something to learn to appreciate more lazy cruising on a nice afternoon without getting suckered into the temptation to always be looking for roads for more spirited sport riding. Just sharing in case it helps anyone else or if anyone has more experienced thoughts on this.
 

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I would like to start and say your story sound exactly what happened to me.I was in first gear ,turning to my right and on a new T120 the rear end slipped right out from under from under me about $500 in labor on parts later ,but i was overwhelmed on why it happened just get online and make a list and order new parts consult triumphaftersales.com for part numbers and then give your part numbers to the parts man at your bike shop and he will double check your numbers and then order. after about 3 weeks have the shop pick up bike. She just has some bruise's.Hey you know what they say"The Best accident to have is one you can walk away from "great to hear you are fine.Get right back and that Steel Horse ...I think what when wrong was for me and my accident was to close to freezing temp outside, oil on the turn on a heavy used intersection the road had a slight incline going up and away from me and 5 mile a hour a bamm. I was down and shocked,well i was allright .Brand new tires ,you should of seen me driving home and my lane splitters mirror on right hand side flopping side to side. HaHa. I bought some crash bars from Motocultureclub a little high temp flat spray paint for my Black peashooters.Mounted some cheap foot pegs on the crash bar's Happy in a month.Hope this helps:smile2:
 

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That's really a shame because it's really shocking when it happens and it'll make you hesitant on your bike for a while. When I was taking flying lessons, my instructor kept harping on the idea that it's not one mistake that will put you down but a combination of two or three of them, all at the same time. So you have your case of loss of focus, slippery road, un-scrubbed tires and you're set up for a problem. Of all the things that can go wrong on a 'cycle, loss of focus is really high on the list. It's just astonishing how fast things can happen during a short lapse in attention. I catch myself all too often thinking about something besides the task at hand. My last "down" involved starting to make a right turn from a stop, up a fairly steep ramp and I became unbalanced for some reason and before I could fix it, I was on my side under the bike. I had been thinking about what to have for lunch at our next stop. It can get you every time!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks for the replies and feedback. Yes I noticed this has entered my head a bit on the first ride back on my other bike after this happened. Noticed some target fixation regression issues through corners as I caught myself focused more on the pavement conditions than looking through the turn. I'm also a pilot, and know what you mean about the chain of factors that typically lead to an accident. Flying and riding are both mental challenges, but I'd say you can bust your ass way faster on a bike than in a plane...just not as far to fall on a bike haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So after repairs, I've been able to safely get a little more acqainted with the T100. What a sweet little cruiser. After what happened I was not super excited or confident about riding it again, and didn't know if it would even be something I'd like. I think it will be. It sure doesn't tempt hooliganism like my Speed Triple does.

After a couple weeks thinking about all the factors, I think the road surface was the least significant. Yes, there was some oil residue, but it was very similar to lots of other intersections that I've turned through a million times. At this point I'm thinking that I did not have a full appreciation for how slick new unscrubbed tires have the potential to be. I thought I was careful with all the scrub ins on my other bikes, but the T100 with these non-sport tires must have been a good bit slicker than what I was used to. I discovered later that the front tire was significantly over-inflated at just over 40 PSI vs. the recommended 32. Not sure how much of a difference that really makes but obviously that decreases the contact patch a little. I still think the main factor was the new tires and my momentary lack of focus and appreciation for the risk.

I've now scrubbed them in cautiously, slowly building lean angle until both pegs scraped a few times to get all the tire that I could. So far so good. No traction issues. Again, I'm used to sportier bikes and was surprised by how little lean it takes to scrape peg. That I had not scraped peg when I went down seems to show how little is required to crash under the right circumstances.

Anyway, I'm feeling better about all this now and liking the new addition to the garage!
 

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These type of spills are 100% due to the new tyres on a new bike. Don’t be disheartened.

When I was working at a dealership we had 5 brand new bikes dropped by their new owners or by dealership staff within 1.5km of the shop (over several years I should add). The closest was an air cooled T100 less than 100m into its first ride. All reported the same; very low speed and leaned over into a corner.

Even though we test rode all new bikes a few km before pick up, that’s not enough to scrub the tyres in. 100km really is what’s needed. It’s not just the film on new tyres. New bikes are treated with some sort of protectant for shipping and that must also get on the tyres. That first week of riding a new bike needs always be done with care. Just bad luck.
 

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I'd say that the crash can be attributed to the brand new un-scrubbed tires. They are amazingly slippery and have the ability to let go and loose traction instantly. I've crashed on new tires, get this, I told my 9 year old son that I would scrub in the tires on his DRZ 70 because I have way more "experience" and what did I do? Tucked the front, 4 corners in :|

But I also want to bring your attention to something you mentioned in your first post and that was that you said, "and just as everything was stabilized through the corner (stable lean, not accelerating/rolling on, or braking)...."

So let me ask you this, how do you stabilize a bike? WAS your bike as stable as it could be if you weren't rolling on the gas at all?
 

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sounds like a combo of riding perhaps a little too aggressively on new tires, w/lack of at minimum, maintenance throttle.
 

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My first Bonnie crash happened in a construction zone at 50 mph. Debris was spread across the lane. Front end went into a wobble and down we went. The good thing is that it's pretty easy and relatively cheap to put these back together, and a great excuse to upgrade some things. Mine is an '04, so it got stainless hex head engine cover bolts all around, aftermarket turn signal, bars, etc.

I got really lucky last Sat. Took my wife out for the first time on my BMW K1600. It's got a bit more power than the Triumph twins, and the windshield makes it more difficult to determine my speed when heading directly into the setting sun. Took a decreasing radius off ramp at about 60 mph. Scraped the crap out of my boot. Prayed the whole time that there was no gravel or sand on the road. Made it through the turn, but it was scary.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
But I also want to bring your attention to something you mentioned in your first post and that was that you said, "and just as everything was stabilized through the corner (stable lean, not accelerating/rolling on, or braking)...."

So let me ask you this, how do you stabilize a bike? WAS your bike as stable as it could be if you weren't rolling on the gas at all?
Not sure how to address that. I was stopped before pulling through the intersection turn and accelerated to a certain speed and feel that at the moment I went down that I was applying throttle for a steady speed through the turn, but not accelerating or rolled off decelerating.
 

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Not sure how to address that. I was stopped before pulling through the intersection turn and accelerated to a certain speed and feel that at the moment I went down that I was applying throttle for a steady speed through the turn, but not accelerating or rolled off decelerating.
Ok copy. I was just asking because you mentioned the bike stability. We say at the California Superbike School that in order to stabilize the bike you need to have a gentle roll on in order to get the weight transferred to the rear wheel. Holding the throttle steady won't necessarily get that optimal weight transfer for cornering. But it sounds to me like cold/new tires went away instantly on you. Perhaps a gentler/smoother roll on with less lean angle at that moment would have helped? Do you get what I'm trying to say about bike stability though for future cornering? Does It make sense how you can stabilize the bike using the throttle? :grin2:
 
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