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Discussion Starter #1
Minor but still leaves you stuck and stranded.

Clutch cable. The little nub that goes into the handle broke on my ride today. It seems my clutch always was tough to pull. I thought it would free itself swine after 1k miles. Why would it be tough to pull? Pinched?

Is it hard to replace the whole cable? And who's a good supplier?
 

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Hi Chief, I can most strongly recommend Barnett clutch cable. They have steel crimped ends which so far have proven to be the strongest I've found. Stronger than original Triumph, Venhill, or possible the worst is Emgo.

I had several cables break on me, so I have some experience & know what you are up against.

When adjusting your pressure plate springs don't go deeper than top of head flush with stud. To adjust for wobble, back off adjuster. If you must go tighter on one of them don't go more than 1/2 turn deeper. At full lever pull the springs are nearly coil bound so we don't want to go too deep on adjusters.

Barnett lubed with any of the cable lubes or just motor oil or trans oil the cable friction is as good as Venhill. Personally I found Venhill to be quite good at first, but then Teflon liner starting wearing, then the end pulled off at the clutch lever end. Finally to solve all I went to a genuine Norman Hyde 7 plate clutch. Just 7 friction & 1 extra steel. No need to use special pressure plate, just reuse the normal steel one. Then you can use 500cc springs & the lever effort is much easier & no slip.

The Hyde friction plate steel part is same thickness, but friction pads are thinner & narrower. This makes installed thickness of 7 plates same as normal 6 plate so all adjustments stay the same. The narrower pads concentrate the pressure so no slip & it releases really well also. Of course the 500cc springs put much less stress on cable as well as your fingers. Or you can back off the 650 pressure plate adjuster nuts 2 turns out from flush if you don't want 500 springs. 500 springs will be installed nuts flush.
In any case get the Barnett cable & lube it before you install it.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow, thanks man. I think my first step is just replacing the cable with higher end brand like you did. If it happens again maybe I'll start plying with clutch plates.
 

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That's not a real breakdown. You can ride home with no clutch.

Keep the nipple in the handlebar lever greased, so it can swivel as you pull the lever. Otherwise it bends the inner cable, eventually breaking it.
 

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Another thing to watch for is make sure the cable isn't catching on anything (like the adjuster) as it exits the lever. I've had one get sawn through before this way, the adjuster had a sharp edge from the end of the threading, it was like a little saw.
 

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And,finally,do not attach the cable to anything on its route.Mine is quite light in operation with a normal clutch.Of course,quality make is essential.
 

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Thrasher is right, not a breakdown , just a minor inconvenience, clutch not needed. Back in the 60's half my track bikes had broken clutch cables, we couldn't afford new cables so we just rode around the problem. Eventually my older brother showed me how to re attach cable nipples.

I once was a passenger in my Uncle Huey's 3 speed Vanguard "Spacemaster" :surprise:

He drove 200 miles with no clutch. Easy. All he did to start off was put it in first, ignition on & hit the starter, it would kangaroo hop down the road but kept going with me giving a push as well then leaping in before he floored it. Every time I watch Burt Munro saying push ya bastards, faster faster, I think of old Huey. To stop at stop lights he'd brake in neutral, switch off & repeat. To change gear he just rammed it through:grin2: Good Ol Uncle Huey, knew everything, loved an argument !

But he didn't know his slave cylinder was leaking, I did know that & I was only 14 LOL. I told him but he already knew everything and ignored the kid :grin2:
 

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Chief, be a risk manager and buy two cables.

Cable tie the spare to the frame and you'll be right then should it happen again.

Same goes for throttle cables. :smile2: RR
 

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Once again, I find myself defending Emgo. I have almost all Emgo cables on my bikes other than a few Barnetts on Norton throttles and the occasional Venhill. Yes, even on my race bike.

No issues that I can recall from 20+ years since starting to replace originals..
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I guess the breakdown part is do to me hitting stop lights behind cars with no shoulder. If it was just stop signs I would of rolled through hem slow. But 6 lanes of traffic was a little scary to go through a red light.

When I popped her in gear is when she would jump then die. If it would have been a less busy street I could have ran and jump stared her. But it was just to hairy for a Sunday to risk it. I called a buddy who had a truck. Ironically when I was sitting in the parking lot a got a thumbs up from a guy who liked my bike. I just smiled and waved back not knowing I just held up traffic to find an open parking lot pushing her on the side of the road.

Still love her and can't wait to get her fixed:)
 

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With the engine idling, paddle the bike forward with your feet, then stick it in gear on the move.

Can't help with the six lane traffic situation, sorry.
 

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Wow! I replaced it myself:). And saved a few $$. Pretty easy. Had to lift the tank. The old one was zip tied to the frame. I chose to leave it free flowing so if it breaks again it easier to replace.

Pull feels better. I would prefer it a little easier but it's better then it was when it before it broke.

Actually it's kinda fun to work on these older bikes:)
 

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Chief, be a risk manager and buy two cables.

Cable tie the spare to the frame and you'll be right then should it happen again.

Same goes for throttle cables. :smile2: RR
Yep. That brings back some memories..., used to see people tie them to their frames way back when (before cable ties).
 

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Hi Chief, Yes working on these old bikes is quite fun. I know the kind of traffic you talk about. It's a death wish to ride no clutch in this case.

The 1st time mine broke I was across town & was able to limp back to a relatives house & he drove me home. Wife drove me back & I installed cable there. That was in 1975. Was nearly impossible to find a cable for the high US bars the bike came with. Finally found one miles away & drove car to get it. The next time I was only a short distance from home & limped back. Handle bar end came off both those times. Then the next one, ball end came off at lever inside trans, 3 blocks from home. Then I dug up one of the old cables I'd repaired with a home made end. On that one, I started feeling spongy & I could see it fraying at the trans end & ready to break. Then a new Venhill. The lever end pulled off that one as some of the others had.

Finally I got the Barnett from a friend's recommendation. I road a while with the stock clutch, then finally decided to install the Hyde, mostly to reduce lever effort. I like to do all day rides & also go far from home in remote areas with no cell phone service. So I always carried a spare cable in a back pack or saddle bag. My friend has several thousand miles on his Barnett with stock 650 (1969 Bonnie) clutch & no breakage. The guys at Rabers say Barnett is by far the strongest.

I just checked my records & Venhill lasted 2800 mi. which may be better than the prior stock cables. So far I have 1500 mi. on Barnett. Bike just turned 16k original miles this week. So far the Barnett has not shown any pull out of ends or fraying of strands. I installed Hyde clutch just 200mi. after Barnett cable, so we'll see how it does over time, but with less force even the others may have done well. So far this year I've covered 3k miles on bike.

The 750 twin came with much stronger clutch springs than 650s which is part of the problem. Lever ratio is different to reduce lever effort, but still very hard to pull. With the 650 springs & my lever my clutch effort feels like a modern bike, meaning you can hold clutch in at stop lights & all day ride doesn't tire my hand.

On a 650 with stock motor I'd switch to 500cc springs as suggested by Hyde. In USA was about $160 for clutch, shipping, exchange rate fee.

Where is Cypress? The island below Turkey or a town somewhere else?
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I thought I was getting a Barnett. But it wasn't. My mistake for not reading the fine print. But I know what to do next time. Might buy another as back up.

No, I live in Southern California. Close to the coast but not an island int the Mediterranean.
 

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I used to use Barnett cables ...After using a Venhill I won't be using Barnett...The Venhill gives a better "feel" in my opinion.
 

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CypUs is the island
I'm with TR7V man, I had him on the island. :laugh2:

I cannot recommend a brand, other than to say that a cable from TMS, Nottingham has served me for 10'000 miles over 6 years. I consider this OK.

It's 'gonna break next trip now :frown2: RR
 

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"Pull feels better. I would prefer it a little easier but it's better then it was when it before it broke."

I'm sure you probably thought of this but figure I'd bring it up since nobody mentioned it. I believe the standard UK spec handlebars are about 26 inches wide tip-to-tip. The US spec handlebars are about 32 inches wide with a 5 inch rise. Clutch and brake cables are offered in smaller sizes for UK handles and larger for US ones. The smaller cable would be able to hook up to US handlebars but it would definitely feel a bit too tight/not give you a lot of play when turning the front wheel/using the controls. Make sure it's the proper cable for US handlebars!
 

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The 750 twin came with much stronger clutch springs than 650s which is part of the problem. Lever ratio is different to reduce lever effort, but still very hard to pull. With the 650 springs & my lever my clutch effort feels like a modern bike, meaning you can hold clutch in at stop lights & all day ride doesn't tire my hand.
Don
Would you have a part number for the 650 springs?
I'm finding springs that are marketed for 650/750 so I'm guessing they may be the heavier ones claimed to suit all.
 
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