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Discussion Starter #1
Alright I have a 2014 Bonneville mag I'm making into just a street ripper hooligan. It feels like it wants to flop into the corners. I have read that parts manuals aren't a thing with triumph. I would like to check the steering head fall away and the torque on the steering nut. Anyone have specs for this?
 

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First, what mods if any have been done on bike? Are rear shocks stock height or the taller Thruxton spec? That makes tip in more frisky. Also what size tires are on? I've found skinner front makes things even more frisky for cornering. You can check steering head bearings for notchiness or slack by supporting front off ground and slowing turning left right while feeling for a notch which usually occurs near straight ahead point. Then grab both forks and give gentle back and forward pulls to feel for bearing slop.

How are the front and rear shocks condition? Time for fresh fluid front? Rears too soft for weight?

There are on line parts schematics at a few places. But for torque spec you need the shop manual and or the Haynes book.
 

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no mods as of yet, still set up how we bought it when we bought it used. it has a windshield, saddlebags, and I don't think the handlebar is stock it looks to tall for stock. Tires are Avons but they are stock size.
 

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flop

What tyre pressures are you running. manually try for excess movement in head and wheel bearings. Also as Bonza said are tyres new and was the axle tightened correctly.
 

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What tyre pressures are you running
I'm with Askari here. Good chance that it's low tire pressure, especially as it is getting colder outside. It's also super easy to check and remedy, so should be high on the check list :grin2:
 

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This might be sort of an edge case, but I figured I'd mention it... are you a big guy? When a bike sits lower in the back, it effectively slackens the head angle. At the extreme, it can make the bike feel like it's "flopping" into a turn the way that cruisers do.

If there's anything to that, the fix is shocks. Also, when Race Tech did the suspension on my Scrambler for the same kind of street use, they raised the fork tubes slightly to give the bike a slightly nose down attitude. It really makes a surprising difference.

FWIW.
 

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Sorry been busy with work. Yes, I am a bigger dude. 6 foot, 265 lbs. I decided to bring her to my shop today. Before I left I took the sun-baked saddlebags off. Realized that the shocks we're set on the lowest setting, so I adjusted them. I adjusted the handlebars from the low position to a more upright scrambler position. This helped quite a bit actually. At lunch, today ill check the free play in the front end, torque on the steering but and tire pressure. I need to look at the tires and see what they say for tire pressure.
 

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Sorry been busy with work. Yes, I am a bigger dude. 6 foot, 265 lbs. I decided to bring her to my shop today. Before I left I took the sun-baked saddlebags off. Realized that the shocks we're set on the lowest setting, so I adjusted them. I adjusted the handlebars from the low position to a more upright scrambler position. This helped quite a bit actually. At lunch, today ill check the free play in the front end, torque on the steering but and tire pressure. I need to look at the tires and see what they say for tire pressure.
Big dude plus bags, and shocks at the lowest preload setting... I think you might have your answer. Factory assumptions for rider weight are often around 180 or so, a big delta.

I don't mean to spend your money, but you might want to put up-rated shocks on your birthday list. I think it would make a big difference for you.
 

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Ya the stock rear shocks are the best Triumph could put on the bike $8 a pair ;-)

You can try the higher preload setting. I found it too harsh over bumps (I'm 210 lbs and bike is the T100 so not likely the same experience you will have. I replaced them with a used set of Hagon Classic III's (came with shrouded springs but can be removed if wanted). If you are ordering new from Hagon they can fit with a spring ideal for your riding weight I believe. Were are great upgrade for $150 (used price)...changed the whole ride characteristics of the bike for the better....firm yet dampens out big bumps very nicely. No need to spend $500-$1200 on fancy rears for these heavy, non-racing bikes. I have a buddy who went with TecBike Parts rears with external gas canisters...he is much bigger than me and they worked well for him ($100 USD pair new).
 

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Nearly lost my Thruxton on the first corner of test ride when considering buying (used) on my test run. Not a Triumph dealer. Recon tire pressures hadn't been checked since previous owner had traded it in. After checking found both to be about 8lbs below recommended pressure.

Air hose fixed it at the gas station and all was good for the ride home. Yes I purchased, even after the crazy ride. Bike was almost stock. Began working on my upgrades from there. Love the bike now, no regrets!!

Bottom line - be sure to check and maintain correct tire pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Spent all weekend with the ick that the kids brought home. But, did get to ride on Thursday and Friday. After taking off bags and windshield, properly setting the rear shocks, adjusting the handlebars, torquing the wheel, forks and steering nut and putting in proper tire pressure, it corners like a champ. Thank you guys for the help.
 
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