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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my first Bonneville a year ago, a 2006 790 with a few typical performance mods. Love it. However, I recently rented a 2020 T100 Black for a day tour of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State and was pleasantly surprised at the difference a bit of tech makes. I love the soul of my old 06, but man that 2020 had so many convenient features.

So my question is...what’s your favorite? Which year/model of Bonnie provides the best all around riding or aesthetic experience?
 

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For me - The actual British built early T100's. If I am going to have nostalgia, that is what I am going to have and if I want modern, which I have a modern bike it won't be the Bonneville type line. Just my opinion of course since you asked.
 

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2007 for sure.
  • 865 cc engine with all the engineering fixes
  • Carbureted - simpler, which I prefer
  • Nicer, narrower tank - efi tanks are more bulbous - required to fit the fuel pump.
  • Nicer rear hub - later years have straight spoke rear hubs which are less aesthetically pleasing to me.
No other year has this combination of features.
 

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2009 Bonneville T100
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By sheer luck (I didn't know anything about Triumphs), I got a post-EFI pre-CanBUS bike, 2009. Best of both worlds. Having always had carb bikes I love the EFI, and the lack of CanBUS has allowed me to do a lot more customisation. For example replacing the entire instrument cluster with a single electronic gauge.
 

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2007 for sure.
  • 865 cc engine with all the engineering fixes
  • Carbureted - simpler, which I prefer
  • Nicer, narrower tank - efi tanks are more bulbous - required to fit the fuel pump.
  • Nicer rear hub - later years have straight spoke rear hubs which are less aesthetically pleasing to me.
No other year has this combination of features.
Also, the 2006 and 2007 865's have the classic 19" front wheel, and a bit more classic looking gauge faces. That makes them about as close to the real early classics as any relatively current Triumph model and year given all the pluses you mentioned, and without the leaking oil nor big vibrations of the 60's Bonnevilles.
 

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I've had 2 T120 (2016 & 2018) and I went back to my old 2006 T100. I was lucky enough to buy it back. Could have gone for a another one, but that was mine. Emotions, I know.
Altough technically the new ones are better, I prefer the old one to ride.
The T120 always felt like a heavy diesel truck to me.
I did do some mods like wider flattracker bars, Beringer brake, front & rear suspension which made some (major) improvements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've had 2 T120 (2016 & 2018) and I went back to my old 2006 T100. I was lucky enough to buy it back. Could have gone for a another one, but that was mine. Emotions, I know.
Altough technically the new ones are better, I prefer the old one to ride.
The T120 always felt like a heavy diesel truck to me.
I did do some mods like wider flattracker bars, Beringer brake, front & rear suspension which made some (major) improvements.
Interesting! I have a 2006 790 model, and find myself dreaming of a T120.
 

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I've had 2 T120 (2016 & 2018) and I went back to my old 2006 T100. I was lucky enough to buy it back. Could have gone for a another one, but that was mine. Emotions, I know.
Altough technically the new ones are better, I prefer the old one to ride.
The T120 always felt like a heavy diesel truck to me.
I did do some mods like wider flattracker bars, Beringer brake, front & rear suspension which made some (major) improvements.
What were your brake modifications and what kind of improvement did it make?
 

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Both my 05 T100 and my 08 T100 where my favorites. The 05 met a untimely death about 11 yrs ago. I ran into a deer. But on the other had my 08 has been as reliable as a brick. Plus I've done a few mods that make her even better. We've been together for 11 yrs and, who knows how much longer.
 

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What were your brake modifications and what kind of improvement did it make?
Beringer is a brand of brakes.
I had a Duke 690 at the same time as the T100. The Duke had some real (Brembo) brake.
After riding the Duke, I took the T100 for a spin. Being used to the Duke's brake I almost rear-ended a car with the T100.
Went for some advice with knowledgeable people.
Options were a CBF100 (and some other Hondas), Pretech, Beringer brake. Beringer was the only one readily available.
Just adding some margin. Still not sportsbike stopping of course.
 

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Interesting! I have a 2006 790 model, and find myself dreaming of a T120.
It all depends on the type of riding.
If you were to do long distance travel, hours of highway, passenger, luggage, I'd suggest the T120 for the power.
Short, backroad, fun riding, I'd go for the lighter (single disc), more flickable T100.

Maybe if I had bought a LC T100 instead of T120, I would still have it and might have forgotten about the old one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It all depends on the type of riding.
If you were to do long distance travel, hours of highway, passenger, luggage, I'd suggest the T120 for the power.
Short, backroad, fun riding, I'd go for the lighter (single disc), more flickable T100.

Maybe if I had bought a LC T100 instead of T120, I would still have it and might have forgotten about the old one.
It will be 1-2 years before I jump up to a water-cooled Bonnie, but right now I could pick up an 09 and sell my 06 for about the same money. It would get me into the fuel injected 865, think it’s worth the hassle?
 

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The Carb ones have steel fenders. I think EFI got plastic, from a certain moment in time, there have been overlaps of materials used.. Screw on badges replaced by glued ones. And some other details. Of course no hassle with dirty carbs etc.
Straight exhaust header pipes on Efi, vs the kinked ones on carb (at the footpegs).
I think tech people (not me) prefer carb as they can change jets etc for performance?
I think there a plenty of threads about this on this forum.
 

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Bought my first Triumph since I sold my '73 Daytona back in 1975. It's a 2006 T100 (white and orange). Wanted something that reminded me of my old bike, so it had to be carb'd and wanted the smaller tank. No regrets, even though I've had some issues with dirty carbs. Love the way it sounds (Togas) and rides. I also have an '06 Harley Softail, carb'd of course. I did own a Sportster with FI for a short while. Hated the fact I had no control over idle speed and the throttle response was too delicate for me.

My only dislike of the T100 were the stock bars I tried, it actually had some sort of flat drag bar on it when I bought it. I now have some LSL flat track bars on it. But still searching for a handlebar that was like the one on my '73 Daytona. There are some around, but they are 7/8" diameter. No one seems to make a real 70's style Triumph bar in 1" diameter.
 

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It will be 1-2 years before I jump up to a water-cooled Bonnie, but right now I could pick up an 09 and sell my 06 for about the same money. It would get me into the fuel injected 865, think it’s worth the hassle?
Your 2006 is a true British-built Triumph. As mentioned, steel fenders, side panels, badging, and just the feeling of a real English bike.
I would not give that up if it were me.
 

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I'm on a 2001 and it's a loveable beast. The more it's ridden the cozier it gets. Repairs / maintenance have all been very doable w/ the great help of forums such as this. I've kept it pretty much stock and I drive in the USA North East Corridor--for mirror folks, the stock mirrors have worked fine for visibility and such. Lots of metal (fenders etc). Carbs come off without ado. Was looking at the late 60s/early 70s models but opted to give up kick staring. I moved from early 70s late 60's Hondas always knowing I'd end up on a Bonneville. Someone wrote that if they were going to get a Bonnie based on new tech, they might just get a modern style bike which seems to be my mindset (not getting one but if I did it would be something of the ilk of a 2017 onward Honda. The 2001 can feel a bit heavy in parking lots at times and lord knows if I park in an inclined downward parking spot I'm likely going to have to hand push the bike out of the spot but there's a certain strange joy in all of this. The bike's been bullet proof for the most part and been out below freezing and up around 100 degrees F in thick city trafficl
 

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Maybe we shouldn't discount the Thailand built Bonnevilles.

Thailand has a fine history of motorcycle manufacturing. They build for Honda, Ducati, MV Augusta and others.
 

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The correct year of Bonneville is the 2007. And for bonus points, the correct color is black.

The 2007, at least in the second half of the run, had the redesigned rear hub that fixed the problem with breaking spokes (which never existed, but yet went away with the redesign). It had the larger 865 motor, but the smaller pre-EFI gas tank. And it had carbs. Which if I need to explain, you'll never understand. And most importantly, very importantly, it had metal tank badges. People with plastic tank badges think they are happy, but that's only because they have never had metal tank badges.

You could get them with red-on-black tank and a tach, which are very good. But not quite as cool, nor as fast, as the blacked-out version.

There are other years that are nearly as cool, including my 2008. But the pinnacle was 2007. It's just a fact.
 
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