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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There's a local craigslist post of a guy selling what he's calling a 1971 Triumph 250 (although he's not sure on the year.) It doesn't run, but he says everything moves freely. He's asking $800. That seems high to me, but I could be wrong.

I'm interested, because this could be a fun project and would help me learn more about working on these old tarts, since I'd be more inclined to work on a non-running bike than my actually running TR6R.

Looking at pictures, it looks like the 1971 Trailblazer.

Here are two of the pictures from the article, in case anyone is curious:
http://imgur.com/a/uB6FZ


Just curious what the opinions of the braintrust on the value of this bike in a non-running condition.

Edit: also, are these street legal? This looks like it could be turned into a really cool dual-sport type of bike.
 

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what is not to like about that nice trail bike. It looks great. All the parts seem to be there. A total starter for a very nice project. I imagine a bike like this would go for three times the ask price in UK. Of course the ship and customs and ...... would factor into the mix. Nevertheless, a quick purchase and contact with a seller over there may be worth it. $800 isn't life threatening even if you intend to turn it into a project

https://atlanta.craigslist.org/nat/mcy/5597389929.html
 

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If it's a TR25, they aren't very desirable or collectable, though they are rare (because the engines don't last long), I passed, it hadn't run in 25 years, though the engine was free, I did a bit of research on them.
 

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IIRC in '71 there was a T25T Trailblazer and a T25SS Blazer. I think that bike is the latter judging from the front wheel. T25T had a 20" and didn't have the scoop on the drum. SS had an 18" and the scoop. Other than that, I think the only differences were the T25T had a high mounted front fender. But in that pic, there's a lot that isn't stock.

Anyway, they're not collectable but kind of fun to fart around on. Easy to work on. I had a pretty decent T25T for a long time - took my cycle road test on it even - sold it a mid-O maybe 8 years ago for $850 or so. I think it was going back to the UK. But it was almost completely stock and a decent runner. Even had the original Dunlop Trials Universal front tire. It's really hard to find 20" rubber...

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, I looked it up on NADA and they range anywhere from $3700 for one in excellent condition, to $925 in fair condition. So, I'd imagine in not running condition it would be closer to $500. I feel like this could be made into a nice vintage dual-sport type of bike, but I don't know if it's worth the time or effort. Especially if the engines are suspect. I appreciate the info though guys!
 

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Built well,it would be a good bike.When new,they were one of the fastest accelerating 20s in the UK,beating most Japanese bikes,however,and there is always a however,the learner riders would cane them to destruction thus earning a reputation of engines blowing up.At present,a good one would be in excess of £2500 for the model with the high level box exhaust,usually red and a trailblazer SS model.I like them,but not so affordable now over here,in fact,they might even be £3000 plus now.Not many brought back from the States as its a minority market for single 250s.I would certainly buy that but expect to be working on a crank repair.
 

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I agree with whats been said - they had a reputation for being unreliable and blowing up ( i had to fix my younger brothers bike every week "back in the day") -- BUT that is because they were raced everywhere by 16 year olds who knew nothing about maintenance - build it right and it will be a nice bike ( anything with Triumph on the tank has to be good ) -- (even some of the Hinckley ones are OK)
 

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I had the 250SS, I think it was, back in the 70s.
It was the safest motorcycle I've ever owned as it seldom ran.
I'd put my money elsewhere.
 

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You can't wait till next week to jump on the good deal. I figured the seller wouldn't have any trouble getting $800 for that bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, I didn't really know anything about the bike, so I wanted to do my research first. I don't feel bad about missing the deal. It would have been fun, but it also could have opened up a lot of headache.
 

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Yeah, I didn't really know anything about the bike, so I wanted to do my research first. I don't feel bad about missing the deal. It would have been fun, but it also could have opened up a lot of headache.
Didn't even notice that the bike was in your neighborhood. I'm right up the road from you.
 

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oooh

careful, now

why are we still fixing up old triumph motorcycles in the first place when we could buy a honda 750 four that's just as old, but is quicker, faster, more reliable, and doesn't ever need anything?
 

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Well,the 250 could be unreliable in the hands of a 17 year old trying to beat all the Jap bikes on top speed.Ones i see around now keep going if used properly within the limits of a 250.Not very many Trailblazers around now as they held very little value until about 10 years ago.The prices are creeping up in line with other bikes.I often wanted one and searched a few out over 10 years ago.All the ones i viewed had oil burning problems.Not really a common fault but just a worn out engine so i skipped on and left them alone.
 

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oooh

careful, now

why are we still fixing up old triumph motorcycles in the first place when we could buy a honda 750 four that's just as old, but is quicker, faster, more reliable, and doesn't ever need anything?
I'd be the last to deny that the Honda Four was a better prospect for motorised two-wheeled transport than the Triumph twin, but those last 250s were hardly useable. The twins weren't as bad!

Fixing up early Hondas is a different ball game from old Brit bikes and probably more difficult and expensive.

Many people old enough to remember the Blazer would rather forget it!
Actually, it does have unique looks and I'm told that nowadays you can build them to a higher standard than 1970s BSA did and have yourself a bike that will start and run and actually do a few miles.
 

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All teenagers thrashed every kind of bike.
I know i did,but my learner bikes were Hondas and just would not break easily.I did hole a piston in the S90 which was an easy job to fix.250s were unobtainable for me as my motorcycling Dad said they were too fast and dangerous.Mainly due to one of my Brothers hitting a car head on just after passing his test,and with no helmet,and going through the car windscreen,did himself a lot of damage.His bike,a 2stroke single Villiers with a top speed of about 55mph,was broken into two halves.
 

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My son had a BSA version of that bike. It was pretty horrible. We were going to "bring it back to standard" which turned out to be either an impossible mission or fools' errand. I could never decide which. We ended up selling the thing for $200 and it was in running condition…..sort of. I'd say run away!!
 
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