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Folks have used some or all of the following:

1 - impact wrench
2 - chuck of broom handle or pvc slipped inside the fork tube & cut to length so it applies pressure to the dampner rod
3 - #6 easy out fitted into a piece of square tubing long enough to protrude from the fork tube
4 - a machine shop

Personally, I can only vouch for 3...works great.

Good luck,

--Rich
 

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Folks have used some or all of the following:

1 - impact wrench
2 - chuck of broom handle or pvc slipped inside the fork tube & cut to length so it applies pressure to the dampner rod
3 - #6 easy out fitted into a piece of square tubing long enough to protrude from the fork tube
4 - a machine shop

Personally, I can only vouch for 3...works great.

Good luck,

--Rich
Thanks. My first fork came alerts relatively easy. The second gave me the spinning bolt. I ended up taking to my motorcycle shop who had and impact gun :D
 

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Does anybody have contact info for Rockwall Performance? I am looking into a set of clip ons so I can finish my F3 fork conversion on my Thruxton. Thanks. Steve
 

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Are there any special tools needed when doing the swap over? I know with USD forks on sport bikes a lot of special tools are needed.
 

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Only "special" tools really needed (as stated before) is an impact air wrench. On mine, the Honda forks came apart very easy, but the Triumph ones were a pain to get the allen bolts out of the bottom of the sliders, to release the dampers.
However, saying that, I have just had to change the fork seals on my boy's VFR 750, (with similar forks) and the legs just wouldn't come apart. Had to hit the uppers of the sliders with a blowlamp 'til it smoked. The lower bush was riding inside the upper bush somehow, so it took a few hours of slamming the slider/stanchion apart to get the oil seals out. Wrecked both pairs of bushes.
 

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Only "special" tools really needed (as stated before) is an impact air wrench. On mine, the Honda forks came apart very easy, but the Triumph ones were a pain to get the allen bolts out of the bottom of the sliders, to release the dampers.
However, saying that, I have just had to change the fork seals on my boy's VFR 750, (with similar forks) and the legs just wouldn't come apart. Had to hit the uppers of the sliders with a blowlamp 'til it smoked. The lower bush was riding inside the upper bush somehow, so it took a few hours of slamming the slider/stanchion apart to get the oil seals out. Wrecked both pairs of bushes.

How powerful of an air impact wrench is necessary? More importantly, is an electric impact wrench that takes off stubborn nuts and bolts going to be too much? I have an electric one that I use for removing the front sprocket nuts off my motorcycles and puts out about 380 ft-lbs of torque. (Then again its an impact wrench so I wont necessarily worry about it over spinning and rounding the bolt head--but I do worry it might snap the bolt) Will that be too much? I know there are also cordless impact drivers for driving in screws that put on about 200 in-lbs of torque.

Which would be the better tool in this case?
 

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Sorry, don't know the torque settings for my gun, it was a cheepo one from Aldis, just 4 settings plus forward/reverse. You shouldn't need a lot of torque, the bolts aren't that tight, but it's the speed and ratchet action that does the job, it spins the bolt before overcoming the inertia of the damper in the fork leg. I only used setting 2 @ 100psi.
You want one that spins fast, that's more important than torque. If you have to use it to tighten up the bolts afterwards, you definitely don't want 380 or even 200 ft lbs of torque, hopefully it's adjustable. If the electric one spins fast, then all should be fine. You can always try it out before you start, put the bike on a stand & remove front wheel & give a go, should only need a quick blast, then nip it back up again 'til you're ready to strip the forks. If it still just spins (one of mine did, even with the gun), you will have to remove top nut & spring and jam a broom handle down into the damper, & get someone (wearing gloves) to try and stop the broom handle from spinning!
Good luck
 

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Sorry, don't know the torque settings for my gun, it was a cheepo one from Aldis, just 4 settings plus forward/reverse. You shouldn't need a lot of torque, the bolts aren't that tight, but it's the speed and ratchet action that does the job, it spins the bolt before overcoming the inertia of the damper in the fork leg. I only used setting 2 @ 100psi.
You want one that spins fast, that's more important than torque. If you have to use it to tighten up the bolts afterwards, you definitely don't want 380 or even 200 ft lbs of torque, hopefully it's adjustable. If the electric one spins fast, then all should be fine. You can always try it out before you start, put the bike on a stand & remove front wheel & give a go, should only need a quick blast, then nip it back up again 'til you're ready to strip the forks. If it still just spins (one of mine did, even with the gun), you will have to remove top nut & spring and jam a broom handle down into the damper, & get someone (wearing gloves) to try and stop the broom handle from spinning!
Good luck

Cool, this reassures me my electric impact wrench should do the job.
 

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no. you use the stock triple clamps, so you can run bars. depending on how much tube you project through the top clamp, there may be interference with some bar bends.
 

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I got a set of F3 forks a few weeks ago. I had some time to spend in the garage today, and pulled them out of the sliders........a lot easier than doing the Triumph forks!!. I read that someone had drilled and tapped the bottom bolt screws to the same size as the Triumph bolts. This seems to make good sense to me, and I have a little time on my hands before I can finish the job as my sliders are away being powder coated. In order to get to the bottom nut, do I need to totally dismantle the fork cartridge unit, or is there some quick way of getting it out to re-tap?.

Rob
 

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Follow Up to my post and can add additional knowledge

Hi everyone,

I just wanted to follow up and add to the knowledge pool. I FINALLY got a round to doing this and wanted to add some things on what I did for my Bonneville.

Are there any special tools needed when doing the swap over? I know with USD forks on sport bikes a lot of special tools are needed.
Only "special" tools really needed (as stated before) is an impact air wrench. On mine, the Honda forks came apart very easy, but the Triumph ones were a pain to get the allen bolts out of the bottom of the sliders, to release the dampers.
However, saying that, I have just had to change the fork seals on my boy's VFR 750, (with similar forks) and the legs just wouldn't come apart. Had to hit the uppers of the sliders with a blowlamp 'til it smoked. The lower bush was riding inside the upper bush somehow, so it took a few hours of slamming the slider/stanchion apart to get the oil seals out. Wrecked both pairs of bushes.
As stated above, the Honda F3 forks were a easy. No special tools needed. The Bonneville ones were a different story. I tried with a Dewalt Impact Wrench (the one with a 1/2" square/ratchet drive--a tool I normally use to remove front sprocket nuts)--along with a Pit Posse Damper Rod Holding Tool (
and it would just spin the bolt and rod. I then switched to my Milwaukee Impact Driver (the one that has a quick change hex bit)
and used the Pit Posse Damper Rod tool....and THAT was the right tool and combination for the job. I guess the impact wrench was too big.

How powerful of an air impact wrench is necessary? More importantly, is an electric impact wrench that takes off stubborn nuts and bolts going to be too much? I have an electric one that I use for removing the front sprocket nuts off my motorcycles and puts out about 380 ft-lbs of torque. (Then again its an impact wrench so I wont necessarily worry about it over spinning and rounding the bolt head--but I do worry it might snap the bolt) Will that be too much? I know there are also cordless impact drivers for driving in screws that put on about 200 in-lbs of torque.

Which would be the better tool in this case?
Sorry, don't know the torque settings for my gun, it was a cheepo one from Aldis, just 4 settings plus forward/reverse. You shouldn't need a lot of torque, the bolts aren't that tight, but it's the speed and ratchet action that does the job, it spins the bolt before overcoming the inertia of the damper in the fork leg. I only used setting 2 @ 100psi.
You want one that spins fast, that's more important than torque. If you have to use it to tighten up the bolts afterwards, you definitely don't want 380 or even 200 ft lbs of torque, hopefully it's adjustable. If the electric one spins fast, then all should be fine. You can always try it out before you start, put the bike on a stand & remove front wheel & give a go, should only need a quick blast, then nip it back up again 'til you're ready to strip the forks. If it still just spins (one of mine did, even with the gun), you will have to remove top nut & spring and jam a broom handle down into the damper, & get someone (wearing gloves) to try and stop the broom handle from spinning!
Good luck
As stated above, better to use an impact driver (the one that has a quick change hex bit)...I am thinking you need a tool that spins fast but lets the ratchet/impact action kick in a lot sooner than an impact wrench.

Do you have to run clip-on's with this set up?
You can, but highly recommended. I went with Woodcraft CFM. I got clip ons with 3" rise along with the 1" Harley Clip On bars in black....BEST OPTIOM OUT THERE FOR THIS MOD!!!. You can also change the rises on the clip ons easily by buying the rise of your choice.

Why is it the best option for this mod. You can choose between different rise heights, you can choose either 7/8" or 1" clip ons....good for us later Thruxton or Bonneville/Bonneville T100s that use 1" bars. By doing this, I can use the original grips, electrical controls, master cylinder etc.

My only problem (which is probably only isolated to me) is if you want to run Napolean Bar End mirrors, you will need to do some modification to the clip on bar....which easy.

If you have Napolean Bar End mirrors, you need to use the original hardware that came with it (some people know about the velox bicycle rubber doohickeys for using Napolean bar end mirrors on the OEM Bonneville Handlebars).

You need to take off both bar end plugs from Woodcraft clip ons. Once you do that, I used a pyramid drill bit that maxed out at 3/4" and drill the pyramid bit all the way to the same distance of how far the Napolean Bar end mirrors will go into the bar. Blow out the aluminum shavings and be sure to clean the newly drilled area with some denatured alcohol or rubbing alcohol so the rubber spacer on the Napolean Bar end mirros can expand and hold with friction. Then put back the other plug back.

I will post up pics of my setup once I have the chance...i really like the looks. I will test ride this new setup in a few hours.

I got a set of F3 forks a few weeks ago. I had some time to spend in the garage today, and pulled them out of the sliders........a lot easier than doing the Triumph forks!!. I read that someone had drilled and tapped the bottom bolt screws to the same size as the Triumph bolts. This seems to make good sense to me, and I have a little time on my hands before I can finish the job as my sliders are away being powder coated. In order to get to the bottom nut, do I need to totally dismantle the fork cartridge unit, or is there some quick way of getting it out to re-tap?.

Rob
An option but in my opinion not worth the extra time and risk of damaging the threads on the F3 cartridge unit. I just used a brand new TRIUMPH copper sealing washer and used the HONDA F3 damper rod bolts.
 

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Oil Weight and Linear springs post F3 conversion

Hi.
Wanted to add my .02

After doing the F3 swap and installing .95kg linear springs I'd recommend using 15w oil, 127mm air gap.

After much tuning this has been my most ideal setup to date. I was using 10w at 125mm. The reason being that the Honda manual recommends Honda SS8 which is 10w.
I found the recommended 120mm gap too harsh on big bumps

Fork performance was OK if cruising but the bike was horribly under dampened and wallowed badly when pushed very hard thru the twisties. Probably due to the heavier bike and springs.

15w oil has resolved that completely.
 

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When I fitted the Honda forks I ended up just measuring the 460ml 10w fork oil and pouring it down the side of the top cap. I couldn't work out if/how it would be possible to remove the top cap and release the spring tension to measure the air gap as I don't have the honda manual. Any chance you could walk me through it?. Rob

Might have answered my own question... freee cbr manual

http://www.cbrextreme.com/downloads/manuals/honda_cbr600f3_repair_manual-15.html

starts at page 242
 

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@Blight

Thanks for the fantastically useful info...particularly the diagram you created.

I am (after several hours, largely down to my own ineptitude and that damned bolt on the bottom of one of my Scrambler forks) nearly complete on my s3 fork install.

I do have a question, the fork seal whilst sitting ok at the top of the original Scrambler fork slider, is not sitting sufficiently low (inside) the top of the slider to allow the installation of the securing clip.

I have not lowered the bike off it´s workshop stand and thus, the forks have not been compressed by the weight of the bike itself, but is there something I need to do to force said seal down further into the fork slider and if so, how do I do that without damaging the seal Will lowering the bike back onto its own weight help in then fitting the securing clip, I am thinking it will not, perhaps the reverse and make it less easy to fit the clip.
I have taken care to use the prescribed Bonneville/Honda components as described.

Any help would be much appreciated.
 

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@Blight



Thanks for the fantastically useful info...particularly the diagram you created.



I am (after several hours, largely down to my own ineptitude and that damned bolt on the bottom of one of my Scrambler forks) nearly complete on my s3 fork install.



I do have a question, the fork seal whilst sitting ok at the top of the original Scrambler fork slider, is not sitting sufficiently low (inside) the top of the slider to allow the installation of the securing clip.



I have not lowered the bike off it´s workshop stand and thus, the forks have not been compressed by the weight of the bike itself, but is there something I need to do to force said seal down further into the fork slider and if so, how do I do that without damaging the seal Will lowering the bike back onto its own weight help in then fitting the securing clip, I am thinking it will not, perhaps the reverse and make it less easy to fit the clip.

I have taken care to use the prescribed Bonneville/Honda components as described.



Any help would be much appreciated.

Did you use a seal driver?
 

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Thanks!

For anyone else, I found this on youtube... totally invaluable, I just wish I had watched it BEFORE I started...

It is a workshop video covering dismantle and rebuild of F3 forks, combine the info in that video with the details of what to swap out from your Bonnie and you have a full guide.


A piece of 50mm tubing long enough to slide down the fork and stand proud of the top, would appear to be a great way to drive the seals into place.. take a look.
 
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