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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On another thread a guy mentioned that the riding position on the Striple is not upright but actually an aggressive riding position. This is what you want for fast sporting riding on the twisties. I wanted to keep this but I made these adjustments on my R for increased comfort (for us older guys lol).
-I weigh 160lbs and I adjusted the rear spring preload about 1.5 turns softer (the standard fork preload was fine).
-I adjusted the shock and fork damping settings to half-way between 'soft' and 'standard' for the bumpy backroads around here; even fully 'soft' is still a firm controlled ride.
-I installed a set of Rizoma handlebar risers about 1 inch higher than stock (they also set back about a half inch). Much less strain on the wrists at lower speeds and deceleration, but still leaning well into the wind.
-I installed a Sargent Sports seat (highly recommended) which is shaped much better and greatly reduced the tendency to slide ahead over bumps (looks great too). I haven't gotten numb-butt yet on long rides.
I have been doing some high-speed riding on the bumpy back-road to my parent's summer place and my R has been rock-steady without the slightest twitch around fast bumpy corners with these settings. Of course if one rides mostly on smooth roads then firmer settings can be used.
Keep in mind also you need a set of boots with heels that catch the pegs; when you see the bigger bumps coming at high speeds simply shift the weight to the pegs and use the legs like suspension; the bike's suspension will then work beautifully and you will not get jolts to the spine. A sport bike requires physical effort to enjoy it; it is not made for easy chair comfort like the boring ponderous cruisers. - Wayne
 

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Honestly i think the riding position is not agressive enough. I dont have the R version but i belive the ergos are the same.

I picked my striple up for the wife and the position is too upright for me. Especially when i hit bumps, the shock goes directly up my spinal cord, not good.

I prefer the mweigh forward and my spine curved forward. Much less back damage and more weight on the front wheel (which feels way too light to me.)

My bike is a VFR1200 and the position is very agressive (not quite supersport agressive, but close). My back feels much better after a days ride in the more agressive position.

If she ever stops riding (gets preggo or sumtin) thie striple is getting more agressive handlebars 4 sho.
 

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That's interesting because if I sit up against the tank and stretch my arms my back is nearly straight up and down. I wouldn't call this aggressive at all. The Street Triple is more upright then a lot of so called Sport Touring bikes. I highly recommend tank pads so you can grip with your knees. This will allow you to unload a lot of weight from your arms as your arms should only have to take a little bit of weight so they can be loose and ready to move.
 

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Personally, I find the ergonomics of the street triple, to be very comfortable. I have had a whiplash four times over the last few years, so any kind of pressure on my neck, is extremely uncomfortable. This bike is much more comfortable than my old one. I may however modify so that the handlebars are higher and closer.
 

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I don't find the riding position at all aggressive coming from 8 years on a Blackbird. In fact, the ergonomics are superb for my 5'8" frame. I've done the 1000 miles in 24 hours NZ Grand Challenge twice on my BMW K100RS, twice on the Blackbird and once on the Triple and I was in far better condition on the Triumph than either of the other 2. Just had a bit of finger ache from hanging onto the bars in windy conditions. My butt was fine thanks to the Airhawk pad!

Guess that's a pretty fair test being in the saddle for so long continuously :D
 

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I find that the position is quite upright because I find over the course of a ride I tend to slide forward towards the tank. Sat close to the tank the position (for me at least) is definitely upright. If I want to ride a bit more aggressively or just to be able to duck down behind the fly screen a bit I'll start out with my backside further back on the seat but each successive bump on the road tends to move me forward - perhaps I need velcro on my seat!!!

I'd hate it if the bike had a more aggressive default riding position - that's one of the reasons I didn't buy a sports bike - at least with my Street I've kind of got a choice of how I ride.
 

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Even at 5'9" I found the riding position too upright, as mentioned even more so than my sport touring bike and the peg position too low for proper tank grip, a side effect from the original D675 tank design. Switching to the D675 foot controls and lowering the bars 10mm combined with the stock ST3R seat put me in riding position nirvana for spirited as well as super slab riding. No way is stock position even remotely "aggressive".
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would define 'aggressive' as how much weight is on your arms and wrists at lower speeds. I have ridden 'standard' type motorcycles where I felt like a sail in the wind at 100kmph and I owned a 1984 1000cc Honda Interceptor which at anything less than 160kmph felt like I was doing a continuous push-up. (today's sportbikes are even worse) I found that the weight did not come off my arms on my Striple until speeds of around 130kmph so I would say aggressive for a naked bike; one would need to buy the Daytona for a more aggressive riding position. - Wayne
 

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2012 STR ergos, 1st impressions

I just got my 2012 STR two days ago so I thought I would add my two cents to this discussion. To put these comments into context, please understand that I arrive on my STR from a Harley Dyna cruiser, Honda Gold Wing, and BMW RT (I still have the Harley and BMW). I'm 61 YO, 5'-10", 165 lbs and just riding the STR for local backroad fun.

To me the STR is an aggressive riding position. The first time I sat on one in a dealership, I rejected it out of hand because I thought I would be leaned over too far forward on my arms. After test riding one a year later (it was completely naked with no flyscreen or visor), I was surprised that not only did the wind keep the weight off my wrists but that I had to hold on tight so I wouldn't blow over backwards! I so thoroughly enjoyed its light weight, smooth engine and terrific handling that I bought it on the spot.

So after 400 miles here are some initial impression and questions.
- The first and biggest problem is the seat; it is quite painful after 40 miles. I tried my Airhawk pad from my RT and all that did was slide me towards the tank. From what I've read so far, the Sargent seat sounds like the best bet. Any other options I should consider?
- The next thing I missed was my Crampbuster to ease the effort of throttle control. Fortunately I had an extra so I put that right on. It helped a lot.
- My riding pants slide around on the slippery tank so I ordered TechSpec C3 tank pad grips.
- Now you are going to really laugh and make fun of me, but after a few hours of riding I sometimes did wish I had highway pegs...

I love the cool air flow of the naked bike (the Gold Wing was so protective and hot) so I will not get a flyscreen or visor. The wind seems to take care of the "low" handlebars that I originally feared. However if I change my mind and opt for bar risers, do the Rizoma risers work with the stock 2012 aluminum handlebars or do I need to get Rizoma bars as well?

Great forum, thanks for sharing!
 

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I always recommend having your seat custom built. The seat will be made to fit you based on what you want. All premade seats are a compromise since everyones needs are different. Also having a seat custom built cost no more then a premade one and is sometimes cheaper.

If the risers are designed for 1-1/8" bars then they will work with the STR bars.
 

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I ride mine naked without flyscreen and love it. You will get used to the riding position and not need risers. I bought some 1 inch risers did not like them - it put the bars too high.

The seat will break-in and you will stop sliding forward so much. Probably the best is what Mac said in getting the seat recovered and adjusted to suit your needs.

Bottom line is - the longer I keep this bike, the less mods I am adding to her.
 

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I just got my 2012 STR two days ago so I thought I would add my two cents to this discussion. To put these comments into context, please understand that I arrive on my STR from a Harley Dyna cruiser, Honda Gold Wing, and BMW RT (I still have the Harley and BMW). I'm 61 YO, 5'-10", 165 lbs and just riding the STR for local backroad fun.
I think you've hit the nail on the head - it very much depends what you're used to, plus your own physiology. I'm 63 and 5'8". For me, it's ergonomically superb as I've come from a Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird which was heavy on the wrists on a long haul and my old knees were a bit cramped too. I've now done 15000 km on the Striple and love it to bits. My Airhawk is just an 11" x 9" cruiser pad and it doesn't push me forwards. As ANZAC wisely said, wait until everything settles down and you get used to it before you start chucking a lot of money at it.

The one farkle I've just fitted for the NZ winter as I don't have heated grips is the Acerbis wind guards. Surprisingly effective in near-freezing temperatures and they look quite tidy too. Photos here: http://geoffjames.blogspot.com/2011/07/another-practical-farkle.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@ ozonewanderer; I am 61, 5'-8 and 160lbs (jeez we're in good shape for old guys lol). Ergonomics depends on your riding needs; if a rider is always a high-speed maniac in the corners and does not worry about his driver's license then low bars or the Daytona are great. However most of our time is spent at speeds less than 140kmph (I'm Canadian) so we will not become known to police, and doing a continuous push-up is no fun. I highly recommend the Sargent seat cos it is shaped much better and stops the 'sliding ahead' over bumps; keep in mind any sportbike seat does not have thick padding. I installed Rizoma handlebar risers 1 inch higher than stock which takes a lot of stress off the arms and wrists at lower speeds (they fit the stock bars and I removed the brake line guide to give more slack). I just crouch down on the tank the odd time I am going over 160kmph. I also found the rear spring a bit stiff for my weight and I slackened it about a turn and a half (collars turn counter-clockwise looking down to loosen). For our bumpy roads I have the damping settings set to half-way between 'standard' and 'soft' for both shock and forks as per the manual tables. Even the 'soft' damping settings are fairly firm and controlled. I would only use the 'sport' damping settings if your roads are extremely smooth or you visit racetracks. The suspension gets more supple and the transmission slicker shifting after a few thousand miles. I replaced the stock headlight bulbs with the GE Nighthawk Platinum bulbs ($50) which are the same watts but are whiter and brighter with a touch of blue; other drivers seem to notice me more quickly. - Wayne
 

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I'm 63 and 5'8". For me, it's ergonomically superb as I've come from a Honda CBR1100XX Blackbird which was heavy on the wrists on a long haul and my old knees were a bit cramped too.
Yup. 66 and 5'9" for me, and with a dodgy lower back from too many years in fast jets, and I find the bike very comfortable as stock. As with you and the Bird, I have come from a 2009 Fireblade, and this little jobbie is very comfy.
 

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Yup. 66 and 5'9" for me, and with a dodgy lower back from too many years in fast jets, and I find the bike very comfortable as stock. As with you and the Bird, I have come from a 2009 Fireblade, and this little jobbie is very comfy.
Looking at your age and fast jets... Buccaneer/Lightning/Harrier maybe Jaguar? Hope the shagged back wasn't courtesy of Martin Baker!

Have been around aircraft all my life - Dad was a physicist with the Royal Aircraft Establisment at Thurleigh.

Don't suppose you knew S/L Mike Hardwick? We went to school together.

Cheers,

Geoff
 
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