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I tried to start my 02 tiger (5000 miles) yesterday after not having started it for 4 months (moved cross country). The battery was dead so I used my car battery charger at the 2 amp setting. After waiting approximately 30 mins I was barely able to turn the cat over and start the engine. Unfortunately, the engine light was on. In cars, at least in my beamer, the engine light is not a big deal (if you have oil/h20 in the vehicle etc..) I decided to take the bike out and it was running fine until it stalled a few miles from home. Of course, the battery couldn't turn the engine over and I had to run up and down a hill a few times to start the bike (very exhausting!). I'm wondering if I fried the battery and it's affecting the engine light? I looked at the charger and it never got over 10 amps ( at start of charge) and went down to 5 amps after 15 seconds. After getting home I put the battery on a trickle charger and the bike started fine this morning, but the light was still on. Any explanations for the light would be appreciated. Also how do I test the battery to see if it's okay?
Cheers
Tr672
p.s. On the port (left) side of the gas tank, just behind the fuel connectors is a shiny cylindrical button with a shiny/thin fitting protruding out (looks like a vent fitting of some sort) should that have a hose attached and could this be a source of my problem?
 

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First off I presume you have connected the car charger to your battery without disconnecting the negative lead of the battery. At a guess I would say that you have damaged the engine management system and this is only a guess you understand.
The reason being is this: "ordinary car type battery chargers" are not regulated i.e they will keep pumping electricity in to you battery for as long as they are connected, what happens then is the terminal voltage of your battery rises to 18,20,24 volts and any voltage sensitive electrical equipment still attached to the bike(or car) will fry.

If you must use this type of charger then disconnect or remove the battery from the vehicle.

I would suggest that your battery was discharged to begin with and now because the system has been cooked your charging system is not working.

1. Buy a new battery.

2. In future use an Optimate charger or similar.

Hope this helps.

Let us know how you get on.
 

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As I understand it, the engine management system can record a low voltage warning error in its log and, given the state of your battery, it's quite possibly the cause of your engine management light illumination and may extinguish after the three warmup/cooldown cycles as had been detailed elsewhere on this forum.

However, tigerbob is totally correct in that you must never connect a standard automotive charger up to your bike. Firstly because of the risk of damage to the bike's delicate electronics, and secondly because the sealed batteries used in the Tiger (and most other bikes these days) must be charged with a carefully controlled charger, otherwise there is a risk of irreparable damage or even explosion.

If you've had to let your battery become deeply discharged, it's going to be damaged/unreliable at best. Your best bet is definitely to replace it.
 
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Hi guys,
Thanks for the info. Yes, I initially didn't disconnect the neg. Post when charging the battery. I did put on one of those cheap trickle chargers overnight and was able to start the bike in the morning no problem (the headlight was bright) . The engine light was still on though. I read your charging advice... does the battery damage apply even if the professional automatic charger (different than the cheap trickle charger used last night) was set to only the 2 amp trickle charge? I guess what your telling me is that the charger's voltage would still exceed the 12-14 volts and damage the electrical components ie.. the engine light? I'm hoping that what the last two guys stated in the posts is inf fact the case and that I only need to start and warm up the bike three times in order to extinguish the light. At the very least I guess I'll have to spring for a new battery. I don't know how much charge the battery will hold, only that it will start the bike after being trickle charged all night.
Thxs again,
Tr672
p.s. what are the chances I screwed up the bike charging system or other electronics?
 

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I believe that you have to do more than just warm the bike up. As I understand it you need to run the engine until the fan cuts in, and let it cool down fully. Repeat 2 more times, and if all is well the engine management light should stay off. If not you'll need to see your Triumph dealer to get a proper diagnosis.

Good luck mate.
 
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Hi Guys!
I took the bike for a 4 hour spin and was able to start the bike on the two occasions that I had to. The battery was weak though... I'm looking for the best/cheapest 14 amp battery online any suggestions? The engine light never went out and I believe I've started the bike and run it to operating temperature more than 3 times. I'm hoping the new battery will cure the problem. Thanks again for the help.
Joe
p.s. If anyone knows where I can get the battery tender plus from the same place that would help.
 

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On 2006-12-04 18:28, tr672 wrote:
Hi Guys!
I took the bike for a 4 hour spin and was able to start the bike on the two occasions that I had to. The battery was weak though... I'm looking for the best/cheapest 14 amp battery on line any suggestions? The engine light never went out and I believe I've started the bike and run it to operating temperature more than 3 times. I'm hoping the new battery will cure the problem. Thanks again for the help.
Joe
p.s. If anyone knows where I can get the battery tender plus from the same place that would help.
I had the same problem two weeks ago. I changed the battery and have had no issues so far, the local triumph dealership stated that the batteries on older models always did this and a change of battery will sort the problem. As I am not from your part of the woods, Joe, I'm sorry but unable to tell you the cheapest place for a battery.
 

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Hi Joe,
I recently read a post regarding BatteriesPlus. A gent found a battery for his bike at a very reasonable price.
The fitting on the tank that is missing a hose is normal. I can't remember the reason.

[ This message was edited by: pineygroveshop on 2006-12-05 19:58 ]
 

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> At a guess I would say that you have damaged the engine management system and this is only a guess you understand.

The subsequent operation of the bike suggests that this is not the case. Don't worry about that, Joe.

Granted, using a car charger is not something you want to do in future if you can help it. If it outputs too much amperage, it can blow up the battery, overheat regulator components, etc. But as long as the current wasn't excessive (and that's highly unlikely at the 2 amp setting), you didn't damage anything this time.

The battery is simply too sulfated from age and disuse to take a charge properly.

All your symptoms are entirely consistent with the battery having one or more bad cells. Don't waste time looking for the absolute rock-bottom price! You're living on the ragged edge, electrically speaking, and could end up pushing the beast again at any time without further warning.

Get a good battery at the most reasonable price you can find in a single afternoon's search among area dealers, and a tender, and go with that. You won't have to worry about it again for years, so don't fret that last few cents!




[ This message was edited by: Diego on 2006-12-06 10:31 ]
 
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