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Discussion Starter #1
Hi~

I want to have a 2019 ST but there is a little concern about engine heat. I found riders (especially from India ) said 2016 ST was pretty hot when riders stopped in traffic. I wonder how about engine heat on 2019 ST. Because I am in Beijing, the temperature in summer can be around 100 F.

There are no friends or dealers with 2019 ST in my city now, Triumph will sell 2019 ST in 2020 summer in China. I only tried Ducati Scrambler 800, and yeah Ducati is really hot.

Does anyone have ideas about this? Is X-pipe helpful?
 

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The x-pipe helped a bit to reduce the heat but not a significant change in heat. Setting in traffic you will indeed feel the heat. How much is too much, well that depends on your personal comfort threshold. In hot humid climates if it's primary use were city riding in area of traffic congestion, I'd be riding the Vespa 300 or maybe the Guzzi v7. I find the heat to be less of an issue for me with either of those.

Paul
 

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I see that Triumph has not tried to solve these problems.
10 years ago, I tried a Street Twin and I noticed the same drawbacks as on the current model: unbearable heat rises in summer (in Nice) and too large turning radius.
Therefore, Triumph does not take into account the opinions of its customers.
 

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1998 T595 Daytona 2014 Kawasaki Ninja1000ABS
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With the addition of a radiator and no body work to deflect the heat, you are going to feel engine heat. My 2001 SV650S got the massive aluminum frame quite hot around the tank and my thighs. Got roasted in warmer weather. My '98 T595 Daytona with an older style full fairing also roasts me in the summer. My Ninja1000ABS isn't much better. The radiator is concentrating the heat more than if just air/oil cooled. If I lived in a climate of 100ºF, I wouldn't be riding a motorcycle. Maybe a scooter or moped or bicycle. Sorry if you can't stand the heat. What exactly do you think Triumph can do about engine heat on a naked bike? It's part of riding a motorcycle in hot weather with gear on as well. No complaints when the temps drop though.
 

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I see that Triumph has not tried to solve these problems.
10 years ago, I tried a Street Twin and I noticed the same drawbacks as on the current model: unbearable heat rises in summer (in Nice) and too large turning radius.
Therefore, Triumph does not take into account the opinions of its customers.
It’s not that Triumph ignores customer, it’s that they are limited in what they can do. It’s about physics and the result on explosions that occur in the cylinde. With a naked bike there’s little that can be done to manage airflow exiting the engine area. Now, if they could change the rules of physics then it would’ve be an issue. Can we count on you to address that challeng?

Paul.
 
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I had a vfr759 Honda rc24 that used to force the heat from the rear cylinders out through the side panel onto my thigh. Dam near gave me 3rd degree burns in traffic. So it's not a modern thing just physics. The heats got to go somewhere. BTW I thought motorbikes were banned in Tier 1 city's. I read they were trying to get the law relaxed to allow the sale of large imported bikes. Has this happened

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Internal combustion engines get hot, but water cooled Triumphs don't overheat. Indeed, their cooling systems seem to be over designed. It's riders with the overheating "problems". That said, removing my T120's catalytic converter and replacing it with an X-pipe took care of my personal perception of overheating. Even on the hottest days here, there's no baking sensation when I'm sitting in traffic. Is engine heat flowing up and around me? Sure, but it's not like it was when I was sitting over a hot cat converter.
 

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I see that Triumph has not tried to solve these problems.
10 years ago, I tried a Street Twin and I noticed the same drawbacks as on the current model: unbearable heat rises in summer (in Nice) and too large turning radius.
Therefore, Triumph does not take into account the opinions of its customers.
Be grateful you don't own an RG500, the rear expansion chambers are under the riders seat. I can't say the heat coming off the Triumph is an issue, but we don't get 100F heat around these parts. However as mbike points out its physics, that internal combustion generates a lot of waste heat, it has to be removed one way or another. Getting rid of the catalytic convertor would I think make a big difference.
 

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Internal combustion engines get hot, but water cooled Triumphs don't overheat. Indeed, their cooling systems seem to be over designed. It's riders with the overheating "problems". That said, removing my T120's catalytic converter and replacing it with an X-pipe took care of my personal perception of overheating. Even on the hottest days here, there's no baking sensation when I'm sitting in traffic. Is engine heat flowing up and around me? Sure, but it's not like it was when I was sitting over a hot cat converter.
We may not all have the same tolerance to heat as you. Each has their own threshold as to what is comfortable for them. Weather, riding apparel, etc. are other factors that will influence the heat from the motor as perceived by the rider. The heat and humidity of Florida summers and my old age have taken a toll my heat tolerance.

Some here seem to have he misconception that liquid cooled motors make less heat then air cooled motors. NOT True. As motors produce more power they also produce more heat, a fact of physics. The liquid cooling only provides a means to the radiator where it is dissipated into the air. That allows the motor to make more power and heat with less risk of overheating the motor and causing damage.

Paul

Paul
 

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Pretend like you have an air cooled bike with a head temperature gauge and try not to idle very much. Seriously, I agree with several responses above and think removing the cat would help a lot. Haven't done mine but who really needs that extraneous combustion going on, right under the bottom end.
 

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All motorcycle engines produce heat. I have a T120. Larger engine, no real complaints about heat. My wife has Street Twin, she has no issues. Her Indian Scout puts out far more heat than the Street. Try a Harley with twin cam 103. That’s HEAT.
 

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Pretend like you have an air cooled bike with a head temperature gauge and try not to idle very much. Seriously, I agree with several responses above and think removing the cat would help a lot. Haven't done mine but who really needs that extraneous combustion going on, right under the bottom end.
Unfortunately my experience indicates you'd be wrong about the cat removal. I did that on my Street Twin and the reduction in heat was not as significant as I had hoped. Perhaps different model bikes would have a more robust heat reduction...…. dunno??

I too owned a 2019 Indian Scout for a brief period of time. Changing to a V&H slip ons w/o a cat and with quiet baffles did make a noticeable difference in the heat. Much more so then the X-pipe on the Street Twin.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the guys and your helpful info ;) .

I have booked 2019ST. And I don't concern about the engine heat anymore. Even you ride a bicycle in 100F, it will be hot too, right? I guess I have some overthinking for the first bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I had a vfr759 Honda rc24 that used to force the heat from the rear cylinders out through the side panel onto my thigh. Dam near gave me 3rd degree burns in traffic. So it's not a modern thing just physics. The heats got to go somewhere. BTW I thought motorbikes were banned in Tier 1 city's. I read they were trying to get the law relaxed to allow the sale of large imported bikes. Has this happened

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Yeah, you are right.
Most of tier 1 and 2 cities have banned motorbikes. I live in Beijing, and Beijing's policy is a little different. There are two kinds of licenses in Beijing.
Beijing A license: You can ride anywhere except Tiananmen Square Area. The price is super high (around 30,000 US dollars), the government doesn't release A license many years ago, you can only buy it from others, so the price becomes higher and higher.
Beijing B license: You can only ride out of Ring 4. The price is low(around 50 US dollars)

I choose B, because my home and office are on Ring 4, and generally, there are too many B inside Ring 4, the police don't really care about it except for some special events. The delivery men can't afford A, they ride B to send delivery, the city needs them.

Indeed, there are more and more people to buy imported bikes, but it's still a small crowd. I don't think Beijing will relax the law. Even a piece of news said Beijing may stop License B in 2020. Riding bikes is a difficult thing in China, you have to consider too many things.
 
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