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Well, it was a sports bike in the 60’s but the modern Bonnie is unashamedly retro... although it knocks most it’s competition into a cocked hat...


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I really am a bit old fashioned, but I still believe if something is 'retro' it should be made of as many of the original materials as it can be, I know this would push the prices up but it should make the machines more desirable in the long run.

Here's a problem I had with one of my nice plastic parts, the speedo case on my America was made of 'chromed' plastic and over the years had become 'mottled' for want of a better word, If I bought a used one from ebay it could cost me any where up to £150, I found a stainless cased alternative for £15 used from a Chinese bike. If the Chinese can do it why can't Triumph?

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Hi

Thanks but I couldn’t find any tank badges on this link mate?


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That's strange seems to work for me, if you try https://www.3xmotorcycles-superstore.com/ then type Triumph into the search some stuff comes up, can't see badges on there now. They are a real dealer, and have been dealing in Triumphs amongst other stuff for years, I live just over 10 miles from them.

Here's what I found earlier from them,

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I really am a bit old fashioned, but I still believe if something is 'retro' it should be made of as many of the original materials as it can be, I know this would push the prices up but it should make the machines more desirable in the long run.

Here's a problem I had with one of my nice plastic parts, the speedo case on my America was made of 'chromed' plastic and over the years had become 'mottled' for want of a better word, If I bought a used one from ebay it could cost me any where up to £150, I found a stainless cased alternative for £15 used from a Chinese bike. If the Chinese can do it why can't Triumph?

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Well, the reason Meriden Triumph folded up is that it didn’t move with the times and were producing the same (fairly unreliable) Bonnie that they had been pumping out for the last 20 odd years while the Japanese were embracing change producing reliable, oil tight, plastic riddled, multis... Mr Bloor’s boys (and girls) know that they need to stay current and use modern materials; though I do like a bit of stainless and ally...


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That's strange seems to work for me, if you try https://www.3xmotorcycles-superstore.com/ then type Triumph into the search some stuff comes up, can't see badges on there now. They are a real dealer, and have been dealing in Triumphs amongst other stuff for years, I live just over 10 miles from them.

Here's what I found earlier from them,

View attachment 715859 [

Er ok yeah like I said I couldn’t find any badges on that link, just a couple of odds and bobs.

Yep I bought a Laverda Diamanté from these guys years ago...


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There are at least three reasons to use plastic. One may be cost. The other two are corrosion resistance (think fenders) and LIGHTER weight. Lighter weight = easier to push around in the garage, get off the stand, stop at a greasy intersection, better acceleration, faster turn in... lots of good things.
I take my metal badges off my bike before attempting to push it around the garage. Other than that, they don't corrode and they are worth the money. To me. I agree that Triumph moved to plasticy bits to save money. Not sure why those plastic badges bother me so much. Some issue with me, but it does seem like these bikes deserve a proper metal badge.
 

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I take my metal badges off my bike before attempting to push it around the garage. Other than that, they don't corrode and they are worth the money. To me. I agree that Triumph moved to plasticy bits to save money. Not sure why those plastic badges bother me so much. Some issue with me, but it does seem like these bikes deserve a proper metal badge.
I just think that plastic bits, or at least the stuff that manufacturers use to imitate metal, looks cheap. Bonnie59 commented that Triumph was left behind when we had the 'Jap' bike invasion in the 70's because they wouldn't accept change which was true, but back then which I still think is true today 'Jap' bikes were and still are seen as more 'massed produced' where as Triumph along with some other marque's are now seen as being a bit more 'niche', so in my mind Triumph needs to be a bit careful when it comes to the use of certain materials.
 

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I just think that plastic bits, or at least the stuff that manufacturers use to imitate metal, looks cheap. Bonnie59 commented that Triumph was left behind when we had the 'Jap' bike invasion in the 70's because they wouldn't accept change which was true, but back then which I still think is true today 'Jap' bikes were and still are seen as more 'massed produced' where as Triumph along with some other marque's are now seen as being a bit more 'niche', so in my mind Triumph needs to be a bit careful when it comes to the use of certain materials.
Well the Bonnie is unashamedly niche, in a niche class... the rest of the range dominates most classes, built in some of the most modern factories in the world. Thing is, if you don’t develop, you loose your customer base, look at the W800 or 650 interceptor, the RE is hot on the Bonnie’s tail, straight out the box...


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Well the Bonnie is unashamedly niche, in a niche class... the rest of the range dominates most classes, built in some of the most modern factories in the world. Thing is, if you don’t develop, you loose your customer base, look at the W800 or 650 interceptor, the RE is hot on the Bonnie’s tail, straight out the box...
This is where I think Triumph need to tread carefully.

Triumph are now offering around 22 different variants of it's 'classic' twin cylinder motorcycles, around 10 of these are direct Bonneville spin offs. Kawazaki are only giving us 3 different versions of the W800 and RE just two, 650 twin models.
I personally think this is way to many models and Triumph are trying to 'capture' to much of the market which I feel is a mistake, maybe just keep to the main three, T100, T120 and Thruxton. As far as the 'Bobber, Speedmaster, Street Twins and Scrambler' go I don't think so. I own a Triumph 'Bonneville' America, but is it really a Bonnie? I bought it because it's the thing I'm into not for the 'Bonneville' name. When I got involved in the bike scene back in the 80's it was all about getting yer angle grinder and welding set out and living in your shed for a few weeks until you came out with a 'chopped' motorcycle that you thought was different to everybody else's machines and this was being done to a lot of Brit stuff like Bonnies, this is what made your motorcycle personal to your own tastes, not what a motorcycle manufacturer thinks are your tastes!
Or is it just that now we've got the 'Hipsters' trying to clamber on to the home built 'customised' motorcycle culture that died off in the early 1990's, which itself was killed off by the rise of quite horrible mass produced 'Japanese' factory custom motorbikes covered in plastic bits.
 

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This is where I think Triumph need to tread carefully.

Triumph are now offering around 22 different variants of it's 'classic' twin cylinder motorcycles, around 10 of these are direct Bonneville spin offs. Kawazaki are only giving us 3 different versions of the W800 and RE just two, 650 twin models.
I personally think this is way to many models and Triumph are trying to 'capture' to much of the market which I feel is a mistake, maybe just keep to the main three, T100, T120 and Thruxton. As far as the 'Bobber, Speedmaster, Street Twins and Scrambler' go I don't think so. I own a Triumph 'Bonneville' America, but is it really a Bonnie? I bought it because it's the thing I'm into not for the 'Bonneville' name. When I got involved in the bike scene back in the 80's it was all about getting yer angle grinder and welding set out and living in your shed for a few weeks until you came out with a 'chopped' motorcycle that you thought was different to everybody else's machines and this was being done to a lot of Brit stuff like Bonnies, this is what made your motorcycle personal to your own tastes, not what a motorcycle manufacturer thinks are your tastes!
Or is it just that now we've got the 'Hipsters' trying to clamber on to the 'customised' motorcycle culture that died off in the early 1990's, which itself was killed off by the rise of quite horrible mass produced 'Japanese' factory custom motorbikes covered in plastic bits.
Personally I think Triumph have got the measure if the market.

Although it is a shame that to remain competitive and compliant, technology in materiel and electronics, machines become less basic and familiar. And less customisable.

I’m afraid we are entering the twilight of the internal combustion engine (in mass production) as environmental and political drivers shape the future into electric power plants. The torque and power will be phenomenal compared to traditional engines but what of the soul? I have little doubt that all these changes will be similarly mourned (especially by me).
I remember an old fool telling me that I shouldn’t buy a Triumph-Kawasaki (a reference to the close study of the GPZ900R in the development if the early multi engine) when Hinckley was in its infancy, simply because it wasn’t a leaky, unreliable and under developed Meriden Triumph; now they are dominant in many classes and he would have rather stand and look at his lovely old Bonnie and complain that Triumph had failed then move forward; I wonder what he thinks of the modern Bonnie...

I suppose materiel selection and product development will always be a delicate process, with the (current) wants of customers off set against the need to maintain a market position and develop ahead of the competition.

I love my 790 with its carbs and steam ignition, all fixable by me, and will probably hang on to her for as long as practicable. Many newer (and less spanner ready) riders demand switchable modes, electronic aids, individual ‘classic’ styling. and perfect fuelling, while legislation demands cleanliness and quietness..

I feel the same about lumps of ally and stainless, lovely, but progress will always take the upper hand or the company will stagnate I guess..


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This is where I think Triumph need to tread carefully.

Triumph are now offering around 22 different variants of it's 'classic' twin cylinder motorcycles, around 10 of these are direct Bonneville spin offs. Kawazaki are only giving us 3 different versions of the W800 and RE just two, 650 twin models.
I personally think this is way to many models
This marketing model has worked well for Hardly Dangerous for decades in the bike business. Interestingly, the same approach is successfully used by AR-15 manufacturers to lure customers into buying the "latest" model when, in fact, it's nearly the same as what they already own with different bits hung on it!
 

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This marketing model has worked well for Hardly Dangerous for decades in the bike business. Interestingly, the same approach is successfully used by AR-15 manufacturers to lure customers into buying the "latest" model when, in fact, it's nearly the same as what they already own with different bits hung on it!
Thinking about it this should swamp the used market with cheap Triumph twins, not only making them more accessible to the not so well off riders like myself but also making it possible to get cheaper used parts, a bit like Japanese bikes! Which will then make Triumph twins less desirable to the more 'discerning' rider and in turn not so 'valuable' (cant think of a better word sorry) when you want to sell it on, again a bit like Japanese bikes!

Com' on, Triumph are already making the things in Thailand for Christ sake.

Now I am only talking about Triumph twins here and in no way passing comment on other Triumph models, I have never ridden or owned a different Triumph other than my America 'Bonneville?' twin.
I just feel that Triumph have got enough of their other machines on the market to keep up, and indeed in front of the competition, just keep a couple of Bonneville's, Bonneville's and maybe built in the UK using higher end materials.

I can't really comment on Hardly Able to's, I'm only 51 so not old enough to own one yet.
 
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