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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an '06 T100. Last summer it did a quick cut-out and didn't happen again until yesterday. I was on my way for a ride in the mountains when it did the cut-out again and then 3 or 4 more times after that. It's almost as if you cut the ignition off for just a millisecond and then it goes on as normal. I came back to town, put gas in the bike and rode home and it didn't do it again.
Could the crank position sensor be causing this? Maybe Igniter?
I've read through recent posts on this and it seems once the crank sensor goes out it goes all at once. The bike has 17K miles on it and had the rotor replaced about 4K ago, replaced the coil with Nology a couple of years ago.
Any insight would be appreciated.
 

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2022 Triumph Bonneville Street Twin
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It may be the sensor..
But I would first check all the basic electrical connections:
Both ends of both battery cables
Fuses and fuse box connections related wiring connectors.
Handlebar wiring and ignition switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Doc. I had mentioned a new stater 4K ago. Well a couple of weeks ago I thought it went out again (was only charging 11-12v at 2,000 rpm) so I took it up to the Triumph dealer in Ft. Collins. They checked it and it was charging normal 13-14v. They checked all the wiring connectors and everything you mentioned. I've seen your frequent posts and you seem well versed in this - can the stater work fine, then quit, then start working again? I'm concerned about it now and check it before and after each ride expecting a problem. It's not related to my original post, but still wondering...
 

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If the stator connector is not making a good connection long enough for the battery voltage to drop it could be an issue, but that seems unlikely in your situation... So your suspicion of the sensor may be valid.

I do not know the resistance value of the Bonneville sensor, but if you measure it and post the value; others may be able to advise if it's not.

Crank (or cam) position sensor testing should be similar to post one of this Sportster thread:


If not, hopefully others will correct me and we will both learn.
 

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The wiring in post five of this thread do not include the immobilizer, based upon a quick look on my phone. I have been traveling and not yet downloaded them to my laptop to list the wire colors, but tahtye may be of assistance, if he sees this post or receives a PM.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for your input. Most of this testing and measuring is above my head. Since the "hiccup" is rare and has only happened a few times it seems testing it would only give the readings of how it is now, not when it's acting up. Question is, with all the wiring checked should I just go ahead and replace the sensor or wait and see if it gets worse?
 

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My inclination on this is it is in the."primary ignition" circuit. That would be the 12volt side. Of course, that could also include such things as anything from the main fuse through the kill switch, ignition switch, side stand switch, etc. Somehow I doubt it is in the charging circuit. The hard thing, as you mentioned is diagnosing it because it is intermittent. When you get to the point where it just goes off and stays that way you can use a meter and wiring diagram to work your way through the system. These intermittent issues be frustrating. ...J.D.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, frustrating indeed. I'm going to go back through all the wiring connectors and replace the battery which seem fine but is 4 yrs old. I'll just hold my breath while I'm riding and see what happens. Thanks for your input.
 

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Skeptical that it's the battery but at 4 years old, not a bad idea to replace it. I am handicapped, in that my experience with Triumph is so very little compared to Sportsters.
Going back to the post three charging issue, the dealer may have done a good job on checking connectors but it is also possible that a lead to the stator is damaged and intermittent.

There are three common ways for the stator output to be affected:

A winding is shorted to ground

An interwinding short.

An open, possibly intermittent.

There could also be a regulator issue. It has three black- blue wires for the three phases AC, a brown positive and a black negative.

With the regulator disconnected, the stator side of the connector, probe each phase of the AC: A-B, B-C, C-A. With a multimeter set to the resistance/ohm scale.
1. Are the values equal? (probably around 0.5 ohm?)

Again using the ohm scale, measure resistance from each phase to ground.
2. Is each reading infinity? (That is the opposite of zero ohms which would be perfect continuity, wheteas Infinity is a completely open circuit, indicating that no phase is grounded)

If I did not explain this well enough, please do not hesitate to ask for clarification.
 

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Resistance of the trigger/igniter/ckp/cam sensor can be checked by disconnecting the connector and probing the sensor with a multimeter on the ohm the setting.

Voltage output can be checked but that gets a little more tricky. One way is to probe at the ecu/ecm. Another is to pierce insulation with a safety pin on each lead; but be very careful to not short out the two pins, therefore best to stagger the placement, then measure with a voltage setting on the multimeter.

The insulation hole can be filled with silicone sealant.
 

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Just to throw this out there - Water or condensation gets into the float bowls and the fuel tank and when the engine gets an occasional gulp of the water they get a very momentary stall or flat drop out and then go right back to normal running.
Rule of trouble shooting - Simple things first.
 

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It could be that the side stand switch is dirty/intermittent. This is a common issue on old Yamaha SRX600s, but being new to Bonnevilles, I'm not sure if it's an issue with these bikes. I had the one on my SRX fail many moons ago, and it died completely until I unplugged the connector and jumpered the two connectors. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all your input. All the ohmmeter testing is way beyond my abilities, again, since it's only happening occasionally, it seems the readings would be ok when everything is fine. I'll drain the float bowels and check the sidestand switch.
 

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Thanks for all your input. All the ohmmeter testing is way beyond my abilities, again, since it's only happening occasionally, it seems the readings would be ok when everything is fine. I'll drain the float bowels and check the sidestand switch.
Hang in there - We'll get you fixed up.
There are two socket hex screws, one on each bowl bottom for easy draining.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the encouragement. I've been in the carbs several time re-jetting when I first got the bike - was stumbling but turned out to be the coil. Thanks to input from this forum!
Checked the sidestand switch yesterday and it's ok but could still be the problem since the problem is intermittant. Don't know about jumping the switch, do you just hook a wire across the terminal? Got a new battery yesterday although I don't think that's the problem. All the other connectors check out although I'm not sure how to check the ignition cut off switch or the clutch safety switch. Kinda long for the good old days before we had all this "safety" stuff....
 

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Maybe this will help you if you decide to bypass the switch.

Side Stand Switch bypass:

08 T100 the side stand switch connector is behind the left side cover with three wires, a brown, green, and a black wire from the switch. It plugs into a two-wire, black with red tracer and a black wire in the connector to the main harness. To bypass the side stand switch jump across or connect together the black wire and the black wire with the red tracer of the two-wire connector.
 
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The ignition switch is troublesome on these bikes. Just sayin'.

A couple of questions, has your ignition switch been relocated on a Joker type bracket?
When riding, is there a single key in the ignition or a bunch of them on a key ring?

The Joker relocation brackets turn the switch upside down and that shovels moisture into the switch.
If the switch internal contacts are dirty, a bunch of keys swinging around can cause momentary losses of contact. Perhaps it would be worth opening the switch for a clean out and inspection.

The pickup coil is a possibility, though these tend to go down when hot and work again after cooling, its not impossible for the coil to have an intermittent break in it. I doubt this is the case, but these are cheap enough to just replace as a precaution.

One thing about the pickup coil is the air gap. It was originally 1.0mm but around 2006 Triumph changed it to 0.8mm, because it was causing.... intermittent cut outs.

However I would hold off on that until everything else has been checked out as it means removal of the engine case. Its definitely not the charging circuit, that can only fail to charge the battery if it is faulty, it cannot momentarily cut the ignition power.

Other causes of this problem can be a dodgy fuse (never rely on a visual inspection with fuses, always use a meter or continuity tester), breakages of the internal crimp joints in the wiring harness (rare on your carbed model), poor contact in block wiring connectors, frayed or worn through wires and corroded electrical connections, in addition to those causes mentioned here by other members.

Its a waste of time doing diagnostics with a meter on an intermittent electrical fault, Murphy's law will dictate that all is well during the test. You will have to do some detective work, list all the causes mentioned to you and check them out one at a time, starting with the cheapest/easiest to fix.
 
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Just one more thing - forget the clutch switch. The clutch switch only disables the starter, it plays no further part after the engine is started.
 
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