Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just performed a bafflectomy on my 2008 Scrambler, after reading about 5 different bafflectomy threads. I wanted to pass on a very easy way to accomplish the bafflectomy and my impressions of the sound.

First of all you will need to buy a high quality 1 1/8" hole saw. I bought both a 1 1/8 and 1 1/4 inch size but found the 1 1/8 easiest to get through. Also make sure you have a long, heavy duty screw driver and a 12 inch long 1/2 inch drill bit. The drill bit can be a bit smaller or bigger, but does need to be 12 inches or more long. You will also need a pair of vice grips.

Take the hole saw and put into the end of the muffler. I left the mufflers attached for all my work. Drill with LIGHT pressure until the saw cuts through. You will know when it does as there will be nothing left to cut. About a minute or two of drilling will accomplish this step.

Next take your long screw driver and insert into the pipe. Move the screw driver up and down and from side to side. After about another minute of this the short 4 inch pipe will come loose and will start working its way forward. Once it is out about half an inch, remove the screw driver and grape the short pipe with the vice grips and start twisting out. It will take 3 to 5 minutes of twisting and pulling, and the pipe will finally come out. I also would stick the screw driver back in to move the pipe up and down and side to side some more. Once you have the pipe out, pull out what little wrapping material was there. You will also want to take the hole saw and clean out your hole again.

If you listen at this stage, the exhast will be only slightly louder. If you are looking for only the most minor of changes, stop here. For most all of you you will want to move on to the next step.

If you were to look into the end of the muffler with a flashlight, you would see the first restrictor plate. If you want a modest increase in sound take the drill and drill 5 or 6 holes in that restictor plate. Now the sound will have some body, and your bike will no longer sound like a fishtank in a pet store. This level is by no means excessively loud and delivers a comfortable idle sound, and a bit of agression on acceleration. I consider this level to still be moderately quiet. You should not need to rejet.

If you were to look in the end of the muffler with a flashlight now you would see your new holes and the next restrictor plate about 4 or 5 inches on in. To get a really decent sound out of your bafflectomy, you need to drill through the second restictor plate. The beauty of doing this process is that you have some ability to control the sound you get. Start with one hole and listen. If it is not loud enough drill another hole in the second plate. I drilled 6 holes in the second plate and got a very nice sound. Nice bark when you twist the throttle, but still nothing like straight pipes. Now you have a sound that you won't find embarrasing, and you most will find pleasing and adequately loud. You should not have to rejet if you don't want to, although my dealer recommends rejetting even if you are 100% stock.

This is where I stopped. I really like the sound, but I want it louder yet. I am obnoxious and like really loud pipes. If a car is coming into my lane or I think they are about to, I like to pull in the clutch and rev the motor to let them know I am there. I think I will have to get into the third restrictor plate from the other end of the muffler. I don't want to do that until I have my carbs rejetted. Then I will see how I can open it up a bit more.

I appreciate all those who have pioneered this before me, and I hope this will help simplify the process for anyone interested in a low cost way of increasing the volume of their Scrambler exhaust.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
This weekend I bought a long masonary bit and went all the way through the mufflers, thinking they would be hugely loud. They aren't. They are very nice sounding, and the bike still ran good without a rejetting. I took off the mufflers, and man that engine sounds good with straight pipes!! That's the direction I'm heading. I'll keep these bored out stockers for state inspection, but I'm working on a straight pipe project to get the sound of that engine out where it should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
sorry to bump such an old thread, but thanks for the detailed write up. I am going to have a go at this this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Thanks for the detailed write up. This along with some of the pictures that others have provided has given me the confidence to go ahead and do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Very easy, but be patient

I did this fix to my 2010, with one difference;
The second baffle plate has a tube through it very similar to the end baffle. I drove the tube loose with a long 1/2" socket extension (large end against the tube), struck with a 3 lb. hammer. Couple of whacks and it pushed it free, then I used a screwdriver to fish the tube out.

The sound is 1,000% better, without being obnoxious. :D

Now for the Arrow tune.... ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Thanks to all for the excellent write up. Performed the surgery this morning on my 2010 Scrambler, and thought I would reinforce the call for PATIENCE! The original hole saw cut takes about 30 seconds, but then you should expect to spend some considerable time working the exit pipe loose. This pipe appears to be spot-welded to an inner baffle plate, and that has to be fatiqued until the joint fails and you can pull the pipe through. I'll post some pics, if I can figure out how. I probably spent 20 or 30 minutes or so just on that. I had a cup of coffee, and a chair, and every few minutes I needed to sit back and collect my composure, then go at it again.

Pics are now now up in the following post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Picture of exhaust exit pipe still attached to inner baffle

The pipe appears to be spot welded to the baffle. After the hole-saw work, this entire assembly moves freely back and forth several inches. Unfortunately, the baffle--which is attached to the pipe--is too large to be pulled out.



You can see after working the pipe for several minutes, a gap is forming where it is welded to the baffle. Getting closer...patience...get a cup of coffee...relax...



And finally, here are the removed pipes...


 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
I just did this on my 07 scram, then drilled 2 1/5 inch holes in each first solid baffle. The Sound is 100 times better! much more throaty and more pleasant to ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Got another option for riders who want a shorter/louder/lighter pipe set up.
I removed the mufflers completely (heavy!) and took the rear heat shields off, I then made an outline with a sharpie to match the mellow contour of the outer heat shield a semi rounded curve and cut the heat shield with an angle grinder about 1.5 inches longer than the stock pipe where the muffler attached. This hides the cut end of the header pipe. from there I took a roughly 6 inch EMT conduit pipe and drilled out a $hitload of holes and wrapped it with fiberglass muffler packing you can buy at a dirtbike shop for 10$. tape it up with masking tape to keep it tight and slide it into each header.
after that i took a small bolt and ran it through the end of the header pipe where the (compresion/relief?) cuts are on the header for where the muffler clamps on. this prevents the "baffle" from being pushed out just in case. it gives a nice tone and depending on how long or how many hole you cut in the EMT pipe you can customize your sound for nearly nothing and have a cool looking pipe. IMO
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top