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I've been working on my '67 T100R (conversion to desert sled) and came up against a brick wall in trying to pull my tubes back up after a rebuild. My biggest problem was I couldn't figure out the thread type or even the count per inch accurately. The caps I have don't match each other but are threaded the same so reusing them was no problem. So, even if I was willing to buy a $75 tube puller I didn't know if it would include my thread size and type. So I built a puller that pulls from the bottom of the lower leg, and it worked just fine. I used about 6' of 1" x 1/8" strap, a couple pieces of flatbar and a piece of all-thread. The big drawback to my design was that it took a LONG time to run the nut up the thread because about 5" of travel is just compressing the spring, then it starts to pull the tubeup. There is a modification a person could do that would make it much faster. I'm going to try to upload a couple of photos, but I can't say for sure it will work.
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As this is the most recent Air-cooled Hinckley bike forum, you might get better replies on this topic in the Classic forums
(Classic, Vintage & Veteran)

. The modern air-cooled bikes use different shocks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Tornado99- thanks for the suggestion. I have been on this forum for a few years, but mostly glean info. I don't really know my way around, and don't know how to move a post to another section. Thanks for your reply, Larry
 

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Tornado99- thanks for the suggestion. I have been on this forum for a few years, but mostly glean info. I don't really know my way around, and don't know how to move a post to another section. Thanks for your reply, Larry
An Admin can likely move your post...or just start a new one in the other forum. No biggie, happens all the time.
 

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Hi Larry,
If i’m reading this correctly, you are trying to move the stanchion through the bottom yolk (triple tree) and find that they are difficult.
I have two tools that help me with this.
First I remove the two pinch bolts from the lower yolk (triple tree), then lubricate the stanchion with WD40.
I drive some wedges into the pinch slot in the bottom yolk to release some pressure on the stanchion.
Then I place a strap wrench around the stanchion and twist it backwards and forwards while maintaining upward pressure. The stanchion usually zig zags it’s way upwards fairly easily.
Plastic tree felling wedges seem to work the best, but dry wall or door frame wedges work as well, without damaging the bottom yolk.
The strap wrench does not damage or mark the stanchion, do not be tempted to use a pipe wrench (stillsons/monkey wrench) as this will definitely damage the stanchion.

Good Luck
Peg
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I polished the inner diameter of the triples until the tubes would move, with the pinch bolts removed. I used a ” flapper” abrasive wheel in a drill. Don’t overdo it, just polish enough to push the tubes in without a lot of force. The triple still pinches the tubes tight with no problem.
 

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Some people just screw in a wooden broom handle.
If you're having issues, it's possible that either the yoke is bent or the stanchions are oversize
 

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Hi Larry, Peg,

'67 T100R
trying to pull my tubes back up
you are trying to move the stanchion through the bottom yolk (triple tree)
Also into the top yoke?

biggest problem was I couldn't figure out the thread type or even the count per inch accurately. The caps I have don't match each other but are threaded the same
(y) for getting the tubes in anyway.

Triumph only used two threads in the taper-top stanchions - 26 tpi (British Standard Cycle) and 28 tpi (Unified Constant Pitch). So, assuming the "$75 tube puller" is sold by a Meriden Triumph parts dealer, the kit should include parts for both threads.

Triumph used the BSC thread top and bottom of all fork stanchions 'til the end of the '70 model year. '71, they introduced the OIF for the 650 and 250 engines, the OIF forks looked completely different - exposed stanchions, ally sliders, etc. - but Triumph retained the tapered top into the top yoke, but they changed the stanchion threads to the UNCP ...

The T100R (and '71 T100C) kept the pre-'71 forks and afaik the BSC threads in the stanchions. However, muddying the water are the pattern part makers ... :rolleyes: assuming both your bike's stanchions looked the same inside the sliders (OIF stanchions are different from 'dry frame'), afaik the 28-tpi one is a later pattern - presumably the maker didn't want to cough for the tooling to make both 28 tpi and 26 tpi.

However, judging from your pictures, both stanchions are (hard-) chromed? I would expect a 28-tpi pattern one to be but, if the 26-tpi one is also, it isn't original to a '67; Triumph didn't hard-chrome stanchions 'til '70.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Larry,
If i’m reading this correctly, you are trying to move the stanchion through the bottom yolk (triple tree) and find that they are difficult.
I have two tools that help me with this.
First I remove the two pinch bolts from the lower yolk (triple tree), then lubricate the stanchion with WD40.
I drive some wedges into the pinch slot in the bottom yolk to release some pressure on the stanchion.
Then I place a strap wrench around the stanchion and twist it backwards and forwards while maintaining upward pressure. The stanchion usually zig zags it’s way upwards fairly easily.
Plastic tree felling wedges seem to work the best, but dry wall or door frame wedges work as well, without damaging the bottom yolk.
The strap wrench does not damage or mark the stanchion, do not be tempted to use a pipe wrench (stillsons/monkey wrench) as this will definitely damage the stanchion.

Good Luck
Peg
View attachment 717512 View attachment 717513
I polished the inner diameter of the triples until the tubes would move, with the pinch bolts removed. I used a ” flapper” abrasive wheel in a drill. Don’t overdo it, just polish enough to push the tubes in without a lot of force. The triple still pinches the tubes tight with no problem.
duc96cr and Peg and the rest- thanks for the replies. My problem wasn't getting the tubes to pass through the yokes, but to overcome the external fork springs. I do believe the tubes get a little tighter as they finish feeding into the yoke, but not horribly. One other thing I might add is that the tubes are not stock, but from Forking by Frank, so I had serious questions as to the threads. The reason I posted was that I had seen others in several places complaining about the cost of a real tube puller, and since I hadn't done it before, I didn't know what I was up against. Also I'm a firm believer that there are often work-arounds to specialized tools. Larry
 

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Me too Larry. I make my own tools all the time. I made a wheel balance and truing stand from wood, for instance. Wood is Easy to work with, relatively light weight, doesn’t damage parts.
 

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You do not need a puller of any description. The forks are designed such that you can assemble them to the bike in parts.

Rod
 

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Discussion Starter #12
duc96cr-I like to make jigs and some tools with wood also- it's usually easier to find odds and ends of wood than steel anyway. and Rod- two quick things-I needed something to compress the external springs even if I had the lower legs off. But also here's what I ran into as I disassembled them in the first place- one came out in a normal way, all one piece, the other lower leg fell off, so it was not completely assembled on the bike. So I was hesitant to try to assemble the lower leg to the stanchion tube with the tube installed in the yokes. I think the PO thought he had it back together right, but that was not the case. So I was a little gun-shy about assembling after the tubes were in.
 

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I tried to compress my A65 front legs to install them in reverse order - first blocking them by pinch bolts in a lower triple tree, later installing springs and sliders on them, but it doesn't look possible.
It was just a try using my hand, perhaps I should use some method to compress springs.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Adam- I initially tried just compressing them by hand, and I could get maybe 2-3 inches, but it wasn't nearly enough.
 
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