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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all,
Is it just me or does it seem that the chain ajustment method on Speedy is akward? After acidently loosening the chain, I'm having trouble getting the beast to tighten up once again. Is it ok to put a few drops of oil on that narrow turning, sloted wheel? It seems frozen and won't move to tighten the chain up. Any imput here guys would be a great help to get me back on the road.
Cheers!
Gorester
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
drive chain

hey there,
thanks for your reply. yes I un-screwed the one bolt as listed in the 06 riders manual. I think I'll try a little lube down there on the part that needs to turn and ajust chain tention. it is just soooooo narrow that the suplied tool slips off before it can do it's job. seems like a poor design. looks like I'll be riding my Norton comando for a while till I sort this out.
be safe!
gorester
 

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When you rotate that eccentric adjuster, you are actually rotating the whole hub assembly. The hub sits inside the housing (that you open a bit when you loosen the adjuster clamp bolt) and the axle runs through the hub off center (eccentric). So when you rotate the eccentric adjuster you not only move the rear sprocket, axle, wheel, caliper and brake disc forward and backward taking up the slack in the chain, the whole assembly also moves up and down a little. If you understand what an eccentric is, this makes sense. So you should probably try getting the rear wheel off the ground if you're having trouble -- this should make it easier to turn.

Not sure that dribbling oil onto the hub (that narrow slotted wheel you mention is actually a flange that is a solid part of the cast rear hub) will get in there and help much. If it's really stuck, it's not that big a deal to pull the rear wheel and remove the hub. Then you can clean off the crud that's causing it to bind and put a little grease on it where it can actually do some good. While you are in there you can take a look at the rear hub bearings, etc. and make sure everything is looking good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
drive train

Wow! Thanks for all the gerat info here guys. My first inclanation was to lift the bike up off the ground and so forth. The book however says to keep bike on the stand but this weekend my g-friend ( she's a great macanic ) and I are gunna jack Speedy up to do the ajustment ( she's a white and black model ) and get her back on the road! It's great having two bikes though, that Norton is so sweet to occasionaly rip around on. I KNOW that I have two of the BEST Brit bikes ever produced. God save the Queen!!!
Thanks so much guys,
gorester
Dallas,Tx
 

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give me the ecentric over the twin sided tension screws any day, much more precise and no worries of misalignment
I agree. I was totally unfamiliar with Triumph's design for the single sided swingarm until I disassembled it this winter. I thought it was very clever -- I really learned something in the process of digging into it.
 
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