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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When you check the chain freeplay, do you both pull down and push up to stretched to measure or just push up from relaxed sag position?

On the centerstand ok, or does it need to be on the wheels?
 

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I adjusted mine on a rear stand and checked for play in both directions. While on the road a buddy of mine adjusted another friends in a parking lot simply on its side stand. I don't think there is much science in a chain adjustment. Just go for it, not hard at all to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought it was an up and down measurement.
It seemed snug that way, but it's an inch from top location to bottom as spec'd.
 

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I've been told it should be done with weight on the wheels and the measurement is from the relaxed position of the chain,i.e. an inch up or down from where it hangs with no pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've been told it should be done with weight on the wheels and the measurement is from the relaxed position of the chain,i.e. an inch up or down from where it hangs with no pressure.
When you say an inch up OR down, that makes it 2", right?
It's supposed to be 25-30mm, which is 1" to about 1 1/4".
 

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Chain slack is the distance between the centre pins from their upper to their lower position when pushing lightly down and lifting lightly up.

It is better to run a slack than a thight chain. The latter will stretch the chain and can destroy the crankase around the outgoing bearing, making the bearing spin where it engages the cases.

The ideal way to measure chain clearance is to keep the swingarm so that you can draw a straight line from the centre of the front sprocket via the centre line of the swingarm and through the rear axle - if you have a axle centrally fitted to the swingarm. This is when the chain is at its tightest. You will have to determine the tightest spot - the chain is never 100% uniform - and make sure there is still a little amount of slack.

This methode usually requite the shock absorbers to be removed, so very few will attempt it. Instead, find the tightest spot when rotating the wheel and adjust the chain a little slacker than the manual calls for. You can use a staightedge under the chain while pressing it against the wheel to see if it's running true.
 

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stupid

with the notable exception of faffi, maybe some people are just too stupid to own a motorcycle.... there can be fewer maintenance items more simple. It is even, dare I say it, described in the idiot's guide aka Haynes manual.
If you can't do it, get your carer to help.
 

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I see 2 wheels is working on his diplomacy today :D I remember my first bike. I didn't know then that you were supposed to do anything to the chain :doh:

You want to adjust the chain at it's tightest point - both with respect to the chassis of the bike, and also with mechanics of the current condition of the chain.

What I usually do is raise the rear wheel (don't need no stinking center stand), to find the tightest point by rotating. Then, have someone either sit or push down on the bike to get the straightest geometry for the axle. Check the slack from the loosest point on the chain between centers, then adjust.

Done properly, and then cleaned every 500 miles, your chain should last 20k miles plus...

:HappyRoll:
 

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Haynes and the shop manual don't specify being on board when setting this adjustment, and when I did it as shown in the books, my chain was too tight with my 210 pounds on it. I could hear it was not right, so I loosened it to the factory spec, but with me sitting on it this time. Now it seems to be fine, even though it was a very slight adjustment change on the adjuster bolts in the rear. Considering the variance in rider weight possible, I don't understand why this factor is not considered in the factory method?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
with the notable exception of faffi, maybe some people are just too stupid to own a motorcycle.... there can be fewer maintenance items more simple. It is even, dare I say it, described in the idiot's guide aka Haynes manual.
If you can't do it, get your carer to help.
If you don't have something constructive to say, kindly migrate back to your 3 wheel domain.
 

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with the notable exception of faffi, maybe some people are just too stupid to own a motorcycle.... there can be fewer maintenance items more simple. It is even, dare I say it, described in the idiot's guide aka Haynes manual.
If you can't do it, get your carer to help.
Hey dick, maybe the guy has never done a chain adjustment before and is looking for a little support!

Why don't you contribute something helpful?
 

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faffi - could you restate that please? I'm having trouble seeing in my mind what you're doing.

TIA
If you hold a straightedge, thin end against the tyre, just below the chain, you can see if the wheel and chain are running in the same direction - or not. The straightedge should stick out the same amount from the chain at the rear sprocket as near the front end - they should be parallel.

If you lack a straightedge, you can turn the wheel and check the the rear sprocket always run in the center of the chain. If the sprocket always run against either side of the sprocket, the wheel is cocked.
 

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If you hold a straightedge, thin end against the tyre, just below the chain, you can see if the wheel and chain are running in the same direction - or not. The straightedge should stick out the same amount from the chain at the rear sprocket as near the front end - they should be parallel.

If you lack a straightedge, you can turn the wheel and check the the rear sprocket always run in the center of the chain. If the sprocket always run against either side of the sprocket, the wheel is cocked.
Thanks. Thats a good way to verify rear wheel alignment. I've always just eye-ball'ed it after using the aligning marks. I have had to come back and tweak it a bit after riding and discovering that the rear wheel isn't tracking properly.

I should have known wheel alignment was what you were describing. But my mind was locked in on the issue of chain tension, not wheel alignment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Hey dick, maybe the guy has never done a chain adjustment before and is looking for a little support!

Why don't you contribute something helpful?

No I've been doing them since 1971, but figured I'd see what everyone else had to say about it, especially the concept of stretching (or not) from hanging to elevated position.

Good ideas shared from most.
 
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