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Discussion Starter #1
So I just registered on this forum for the purpose of asking this question. Ive been lurking since you guys moved from the TT600 forums...awhile ago.

I've owned two triumphs, this being my second TT600. I bought it with 10,900 on it, and it had just had an oil change, at the dealer, no less. Brand new Triumph oil filter etc.

Problem: The drain plug was put in WAY too tight. I had my local suzuki dealer take a look at it, and even with a breaker bar on it, they were hesitant to try and break the bolt off as A) it had started to round off and B)they didnt know if it was possibly cross threaded and didnt have the desire to re-thread the oil pan/block if it was.

I'm at a loss. The bike is just now ticking over 17200 miles, and i'm worried....ive habitually changed my oil in my bikes, and going past 4.5k for me always made me nervous.

I dont have a triumph dealer anywhere near me, and have been extremely busy lately. I ride this thing on average 50-60 miles a day, and it has a 46 tooth rear sprocket on it...so RPMs are above 7.5k cruising the entire way, mostly around the 8k-9k range.

Is there ANY other bolt I can use once I destroy this thing getting it off? I read somewhere some triumphs use the exact same bolt honda drain plugs do, a 13mm 1.5 thread bolt...etc.

Im at a loss. Im located in So Cal (North LA/Valencia) so getting to a triumph dealership after work is out of the question, but I do have access to alot of tools, and car dealers etc. Already have the oil just sitting here....

Thanks guys,

Alex
 

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if i was you i think i'd get a dealer to change the oil, then if they knacker the bolt they'd be obliged to fix it, even if they charge you its only money you'd have to pay out if you bust it yourself.
 

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Alex.. if a dealer did it I would recommend bringing it back to a dealer. I recently went down to the dealer in Brea for some recall work and I thought they were pretty good. Might be a bit far for you tho.

There's another dealer in Simi Valley.. Maybe that is closer to you??

Simi Valley Cycles
2902 Los Angeles Avenue
Simi Valley
CA

Tel: 805-522-3434
Fax: 805-522-0764

[ This message was edited by: losangeles_S4 on 2007-02-21 21:58 ]
 

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I wouldn't recommend Simi Valley Cycles, not because of their service, but because they never have Triumph Parts in stock. Plus, whenever I ask them if another bike manufacturer's part might work they always brush off the question, as if they don't feel like doing the research, and would rather sell the more expensive (in most cases) Triumph part... I don't personally know about their service department, but to me it seems like it'd take a lot longer with a lack of in stock parts to work with...
I picked up a couple parts from the place in Brea and they took really good care of me, shame though because I'm so much closer to Simi Valley Cycles... Then again that's just a personal opinion...

So who wants to go for a ride in So Cal?

[ This message was edited by: rastataoist on 2007-02-21 22:40 ]
 

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Well thats a bummer. I would definitely recommend the dealer in Brea. They were very helpful to me when I brought my bike in for the recall work. Did it all why I waited and were very courteous. I know they have "drop-in" or "first come, first serve" service on Saturdays.

The bolt shouldn't be rounding off if you are using quality tools and the right size socket. There is a good chance that it was cross threaded in and your threads may be messed up. You need to get the bolt out and fix the situation anyway so just do it.

So you haven't had an oil change in 6300 miles ???????

If its really been that long, then maybe the bolt is just frozen. On older bikes its not uncommon to find something like that. Tap the bolt with a standard hammer. Sometimes that can help. Note I said tap not hit. My recommendation would be a good quality socket, breaker bar and a rubber mallet. Get some Liquid Wrench.

Get a friend to help you. Have them hold the socket in place with pressure towards the case and give the breaker bar a good whack. Again and again until it starts moving. Make sure that socket stays seated while you are doing this..

[ This message was edited by: losangeles_S4 on 2007-02-21 23:05 ]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all your replies guys. Ill give it one more shot, and if I cant get it out, then im heading down to simi/brea and ill have them do the change.

Thanks!

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Drain plug: can anyone tell me what kind of bolt this is? I'm going hunting for a replacement...I thought it was a 13mm/1.5mm
 

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Discussion Starter #8
SUMP BOLT,M14X1.5,FORGED
SERIAL NUMBER 38674 AND HIGHER - 4 CYL ALL VINS, 3 CYL

Sound right? im SURE my bolts not 14mm....hmmm....
 

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I recall it being 13mm, but it has been a while.
 

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Hey, I'd go with what losangeles_S4 said about the socket and breaker bar, but I would also add to that. It's an old classic car restoration trick that has never failed me. Get a common propane torch--you know the kind with the removable head and small bottle. Do the following when the bike is totally cold. Turn the flame low and apply a small amount of heat to the aluminum stud on the oil pan that surrounds the bolt shank. Heat the aluminum until it becomes too hot to place your finger on for more than 3 seconds. Then give the bolt a squirt with Liquid Wrench and try breaking it free. The purpose in heating the aluminum is that the aluminum expands at a lower heat and quicker than the steel bolt. Hopefully the aluminum will expand enough for you to get the bolt loose. I must caution that you pay close attention to not overheating the aluminum, but what I described gives you plenty of safety-net before that would happen. I love stuck bolts/nuts. They put up a great fight but it feels so good when you get them loose!
 

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A saferway to do what bombfactory sugested is to use an electric hot air gun dosent get quite as hot as a flame. if you do use a blow torch if you heat the bolt not the casing then leave it to cool for a few minuits the heat will transfer and expand the alloy
good luck
 

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On 2007-02-22 23:34, BombFactory wrote:
I love stuck bolts/nuts. They put up a great fight but it feels so good when you get them loose!
You are nuts! :razz:

I spent many hours and lots of money dealing with stuck nuts and bolts. I can't tell you how many bottles of propane I used up and how many ez-outs I broke trying to get rusted bolts apart on machinery that had spent a little too much time in the midwest. Being in Seattle where they don't salt the living bejeebers out of the road every time it rains hard sure makes life easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah i'm glad they didn't use salt up there! Just to update everyone, got it fixed, a few taps with a hammer, and I finally broke it loose, threads were fine. Put in some elf, and shes running great.
 
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