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Sooooo... I dreamed about owning a Bonneville for the last 8 years. Obsessed and drooled over them forever. And last Tuesday I finally did it. Found a great deal on a 2012 mag wheel in LA, and snapped it up. I was in heaven for four days. I loved everything about it. The comfortable position (previous bike was a '08 cbr1000rr), the easy handling, and of course the rumble and growl of the exhaust. Then a car unexpectedly pulled out in front of me. Totally raining on my parade.

I laid the bike down on the right side avoiding the car. There's loads of rashed-up parts that need to be replaced. And mostly likely my right side dominator sport. Could this damage be smoothed down, buffed out, and maybe ceramic coated black and not be a total eyesore/reminder of the accident? I don't mind putting the work in, if I'll have a good outcome. What do you guys think?
 

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Sooooo... I dreamed about owning a Bonneville for the last 8 years. Obsessed and drooled over them forever. And last Tuesday I finally did it. Found a great deal on a 2012 mag wheel in LA, and snapped it up. I was in heaven for four days. I loved everything about it. The comfortable position (previous bike was a '08 cbr1000rr), the easy handling, and of course the rumble and growl of the exhaust. Then a car unexpectedly pulled out in front of me. Totally raining on my parade.

I laid the bike down on the right side avoiding the car. There's loads of rashed-up parts that need to be replaced. And mostly likely my right side dominator sport. Could this damage be smoothed down, buffed out, and maybe ceramic coated black and not be a total eyesore/reminder of the accident? I don't mind putting the work in, if I'll have a good outcome. What do you guys think?
Be careful as you've ground across the welded portion where the main cone meets the reverse cone. You may weaken the weld and develop of crack if you take off too much additional material.

You could try sanding it out and ride with it for a while and see what happens. If there are no problems then you could finish polishing them.

We do offer replacements but the logo would be different on one side versus the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Be careful as you've ground across the welded portion where the main cone meets the reverse cone. You may weaken the weld and develop of crack if you take off too much additional material.

You could try sanding it out and ride with it for a while and see what happens. If there are no problems then you could finish polishing them.

We do offer replacements but the logo would be different on one side versus the other.
Oh great!! I didn't think I could get just a single muffler. I'll probably be calling your shop after I settle with the insurance company. Thanks for he info!
 

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I've sanded & polished worse out of mine.
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Me too. I once flipped a trailer with my Bonnie on it and dragged it down the road. :surprise: Insurance replaced my Dom T's but I got to keep the old pipe so a combination of Dremel with a stone followed up by wet sand paper and a couple of hours elbow grease sorted it and I gotta say it looked pretty good. Good enough that the guy who scored the pipes on Craigslist for half price was very pleased. I could've rode on with them and nobody would've noticed.

That said the previous poster's offer is better if money isn't an issue and you want it perfect.
 

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If you're not practiced and skilled with a angle grinder and buff I'd recommend starting with a belt sander first to avoid waves.
OR...just start off with a polishing service and get an appraisal of results & estimate.
 

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If you're not practiced and skilled with a angle grinder and buff I'd recommend starting with a belt sander first to avoid waves.
OR...just start off with a polishing service and get an appraisal of results & estimate.
Are you thinking a bench belt sander or could a hand held work all right? Lastly, what kind of belt(s) would you recommend to get the job done?
 

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3 x 21 hand held is fine and start with 220 grit so you don't add to the grief.
Stay absolutely flat as possible...watch your edges... and work slowly.
Get it even then start blending out...maybe save the blending for hand working depending on how deep the scratches are.
Sand it smooth and even just as if you were prepping for paint.

And I'd still look for a polishing house first.
 
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