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I thought I would fire up my bike, as it has been sitting do to the weather. When I attempted to start it (choke on) it would turn over but would not fire, it seemed to be flooded. However, take the choke off it would fire but not run. I charged the battery tried it again same thing. At first I was thinking it was the carbs. Then I put a new battery in it and it fire right up. My question is this. Is it possible that a week battery that was fully charged not turn the engine fast enough to start? The battery was the original, 2001 Adventurer.
What do guy's think?

Thanks Mike
 

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Its possible you had some dead cells in your battery and even though you thought it was fully charged, in reality it was way down on juice. Sounds like your battery was really old. For your own piece of mind you could have the cells tested in your old battery and see if that was the case.

Rick......................
 

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I've had starting problems due to low voltage on a battery which appeared to have a good charge (lights were on bright, not dimmed). If you are on your original battery from 2001, I think it's high time for a new one. On my 2001 bike, I'm on my second replacement battery.
 

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Don't forget to squeeze the clutch lever when starting the bike, it will turn over faster especially when cold. I had to put the battery on a charger after the last few weeks of deep freeze. Started it with the charger on engine start mode. After a quick ride, it was firing up fine, but my battery is only a year or so old.
It's amazing what a new battery can do for a bike.
 

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A battery that old is probably pretty tired since the normal life on a motorcycle battery is 3-4 years. At that point the capacity is probably 50-60% when charged but the charge bleeds off at about 1% per day so two weeks of no charge on a 60% battery will take it down to around 45%.

Unless a cell has failed completely, it should still start a bike that's in good condition and has good fuel.

The biggest problem with starting a bike in the spring is stale fuel and the most common response to the problem is "get a new battery." That way you can crank longer and it might eventually start after you've cranked the stale gas out of the carbs. The problem is that cranking longer grinds the life out of your starter.

The new gasoline blends are designed for sealed automobile fuel injection systems, not for carbureted bikes that have a fuel system open to evaporation. In a carbureted motorcycle these fuels loose their volatile components very quickly. That results in wet cylinders and plugs (apparent flooding) and prevents ignition of the air/fuel mixture.

So... drain the carbs, drain the fuel tank and put some fresh fuel in. You'll probably need to pull the sparkplugs and clean them (I use brake cleaner and a toothbrush) but the odds are your bike will start.

Jim
 
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