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Do you feel that sportbike riders have to "exaggerate" their body positioning more?

So this is something I've always wondered.

I had a veteran rider create a dichotomy between a cruiser and a sportbike.

He said, "A cruiser works with you and is more forgiving generally."

And..."A sportbike is more like a scapel, it will do more for you but you have to work for it."

Let me try to describe my question through a hypothetical situation;

Say two riders go into the same corner, both carrying the same speed.

Does the sportbike rider have to "exaggerate" their body position more to create that lower center of gravity to navigate the turn?

In that same sense, can the cruiser rider keep their center of gravity a little more in line with the center of the bike to achieve the same thing?

When I mean exaggerate, I really just mean a proper body position and riding technique that is easier to see than on a cruiser. If that makes sense....

Thanks and much appreciated. :)
 

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“More forgiving”? That depends on what a rider likes. I dislike sitting upright, so I prefer a sport bike type of seating position. One man’s torture is another man’s pleasure.

That is too subjective to make such a blanket statement.

If I am riding a sport bike, why would I go into a turn at the same speed as a cruiser?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
“More forgiving”? That depends on what a rider likes. I dislike sitting upright, so I prefer a sport bike type of seating position. One man’s torture is another man’s pleasure.

That is too subjective to make such a blanket statement.

If I am riding a sport bike, why would I go into a turn at the same speed as a cruiser?
I see where you're coming from, but I guess my question has more to do with bike geometry and riding position rather than personal preference. More of a physics question. Sorry if my initial question didn't make that clear.
 

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I had a “similar” argument on another forum, that I was told “why do you thing sport bike riders in MotoGP throw their bodies in all positions to control the bikes” and that the cruisers are “stabler.” I disagree 100 percent. If by “stabler” it means forgiving and slow to react, sure. But this is simple in my book: keep the SPEED equal, and see what effort you need to put into it to take a turn with a sport bike and a cruiser. And to make things easier, keep it at MotoGP speeds. At 120mi and hour turn, what bike do you think will need more effort to make the turn? What do you think the cruiser rider will have to do to make it? Throw his body and “fight” the bike even more than a sport bike. Visualize an HD taking that turn in order to make it... just for giggles.:laugh2:
 

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So this is something I've always wondered.

I had a veteran rider create a dichotomy between a cruiser and a sportbike.

He said, "A cruiser works with you and is more forgiving generally."

And..."A sportbike is more like a scapel, it will do more for you but you have to work for it."

Let me try to describe my question through a hypothetical situation;

Say two riders go into the same corner, both carrying the same speed.

Does the sportbike rider have to "exaggerate" their body position more to create that lower center of gravity to navigate the turn?

In that same sense, can the cruiser rider keep their center of gravity a little more in line with the center of the bike to achieve the same thing?

When I mean exaggerate, I really just mean a proper body position and riding technique that is easier to see than on a cruiser. If that makes sense....

Thanks and much appreciated. :)
In general NO.

It will come down to things like bike geometry, width of tire, ground clearance and that type of thing that may prevent the cruiser from being able to carry the same corner speed that a sport bike can in a corner. I'm a coach with the California Superbike School and can, with good riding technique, stay upright on the bike and not hang off at all and still carry high rates of speed while students hang off like monkey's (what I picture when you say exaggerate body position)

But this brings us to a good topic of discussion. WHY do riders (more often when riding sport bikes) hang off in the first place? What does it do for the bike?
 

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Generally speaking, hanging off will decrease the amount of bike lean needed for a given turn at a given rate of speed. In days of yore, racers did lean off their bikes. They stayed centered on the seat and within the bike. Instead of dragging knees, they dragged their toes. Whether it was Kenny Roberts Sr. or Christian Sarron to first hang off while racing, the rate of speed for a given turn could increase without loosing the edge of traction of the tires. That is the main focus of body position, keeping the contact patch of the rubber stable. But, at most sane street speeds, hanging off vs a slight shift of body position and weight to the inside of the turn is a choice of the rider. As posted above, you can stay centered and still achieve good rates of speed through a turn. The very nature of the body position for a cruiser does not lend itself very well for hanging off or for high rates of speed while cornering. Although, look at vids of cruisers riding the Snake in CA and you will see some exaggerated body positions.

Kevin Schwantz when racing the 2 strokes back in the day had a riding style that most instructors today would say was a mix of keeping his upper body centered and his lower body and legs hanging off in a turn. Riding "crossed up as it's described. Most don't recommend that style, but it certainly worked for Kevin.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In general NO.

It will come down to things like bike geometry, width of tire, ground clearance and that type of thing that may prevent the cruiser from being able to carry the same corner speed that a sport bike can in a corner. I'm a coach with the California Superbike School and can, with good riding technique, stay upright on the bike and not hang off at all and still carry high rates of speed while students hang off like monkey's (what I picture when you say exaggerate body position)

But this brings us to a good topic of discussion. WHY do riders (more often when riding sport bikes) hang off in the first place? What does it do for the bike?
Wonderful advice and a great clarification. Thank you. :)
 

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To fall back to the OP's description of a scalpel. What requires less force to cut something? A scalpel or an axe? I would scalpel. A sportbike actually makes you work way less to negotiate a corner than a cruiser. Throw out rider position, bike geometry, etc and break it down to weight alone. Sport bike 400-500 pounds. Cruiser 600-1000 pounds. Which is going to be easier to I initiate a turn? Now throw men in bike geometry. Sport bike less rake and trail, shorter wheel base means more responsive to body weight and bar inputs. Turns in with less effort and adjust mid-corner line much easier. Cruiser more rake and trail and longer wheel base. Means it takes more effort to initiate a change in direction and response slower.

So many people come up with garbage ideas based on garbage hearsay instead of breaking these things down to physics and facts. The dichotomy your friend spoke was pure garbage.

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Interesting topic and I would also like to agree that the difference in the bikes is such that on a sports bike the weight transfer is very important. Sports bikes have a steeper rake on the front and you will see riders, like MotoGp, will not only transfer their weight to the inside of the corner balancing the centrifugal force being exerted on the bike and its natural tendency to want to sit up and go straight, unless of course the maximum lean angle has been exceeded and also that of their weight to the front of the bike or the rear of the bike dependant on the position in the corner. Rear for the breaking sector then transferring to the front on mid to out of the corner.

There is a great little article on rake and trail here https://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/playing-angles

So to answer the question:

Because we look awesome, we feel faster and because Rossi does it.
 

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It honestly depends on the bike, i can whip my sprint st around pretty good just sitting straight and leaning just a bit on my wrists, but i had a zx9 i had to scrape off the ground to get it around bends. Also i had a sportster that handled very nicely could whip it as well but my custom chopper softtail i couldnt turn that thing worth a damn!!! The pipes would scape on the ground on minor turns and bumps.
 
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