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AGM batteries & regulator output Voltage

(Edited) BMW Voltage regulator with parts that may fit into a Denso... preset at 14.2V

http://www.euromotoelectrics.com/product_p/boalt-reg286.htm
This article suggests that the 14.2V regulator you've found might be good for AGM batteries: http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/absorbent_glass_mat_agm
I'm going to get the part you've found, and try to fit the regulator into my '98 T595 Daytona 40 Amp Denso alternator (Denso part #101211-1611), which I think has a 14.7V regulator. Thanks for the link. I'll let you know if it fits.
 

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Hi: First of all, to congratulate you for the great post, his experience has served me very useful to diagnose the problem with my alternator.
Indeed the fault was in charge controller, unfortunately am an impatient person and with the data I set to work without reading every page of this post, the job would have saved!

Moreover, I am satisfied because the end result is the same as you, only today by going to thank your information and read the last few pages, I realized that you had already found the solution.

Although I started with externally test the connected controller or as used a (metallic) controller of an old alternator, I dispensed with making a plastic adaptation and modified the holes in the chip for engagement and fabricated a small sink, but the result is similar.
Thanks again for your wonderful work.
Greetings from Spain.





 

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Firstly, thanks for all the great information in this topic.

I thought I would add my experience in trying to better control the charge voltage on my 2003 Thunderbird Sport.

I noticed not long after getting the bike last year that the new battery fitted by the seller was loosing electrolyte at an alarming rate despite the bike having hardly been used since buying it. A test of the charging rate soon showed that the battery was being overcharged. The charge rate then was around the 15.8v mark.

A search on here revealed that the voltage regulation on our bikes to be a very definite weak spot. I then found this topic and decided to give the mod described within it a try. I'm an electrician by trade so wasn't worried about carrying out the work but even if you aren't, but are thinking about doing it, don't be put off. It's really very simple as long as you take your time.
I decided to go with the IB301 which is meant to have a cut off point of 14.2v. The reason for this was mainly because I didn't like the idea of having the adjustment potentiometer open to the elements.
I set to and found space between the battery box and the rear mudguard to be the best place to fit it. After removing the battery box I drilled it to take a couple of 6mm countersunk screws, so as not to damage the battery, and fitted and wired the regulator.
Once done I fired the bike up but was disappointed to find the voltage at the battery to be 15v.
Obviously this was still too high so I decided to change the regulator for the IB301A.
Getting hold of one of these is a tale in itself which ended up taking 3 months and me picking it up while we were over in Daytona for bike week!

Congratulations to Triumph America for the first win since 1967 at the Daytona 200 by the way. It was great to be there to see it.

Now back to the point of the post.
Once fitted the regulator was set to 14.4v as, going from the posts on here, that would seem to be the optimum voltage. I'll keep an eye on it over the next few months to ensure things are as they should be. I'll also be ensuring that water isn't finding its way into anything it shouldn't.

So my advice to anyone doing the mod is, obviously, to go for the adjustable regulator as the set voltage type can't be guaranteed to hold the voltage at the specified rate.

I struggled to find the either of the regulators in the UK and ended up using:-
Alternator & Starter Parts Wholesale
www.aspwholesale.com
6160 Skyline Ct.
Spring Hill FL 34606
Phone: (352) 688-3206

Rich, who runs the place, was an absolute diamond to deal with and I can't recommend him highly enough.

Regards to all and thanks for everyone's input on this topic.

Pete
 

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zep1975

Pete, thanks for posting up.

There's another reason that charging voltage can be higher than the regulator set point on our classic triples. (Doesn't apply to the T3 Sport/Touring models as their circuit is different.)

It's because the regulator + feed is also the f/back sense input & on ours this comes off the ignition switch circuit which powers all the loads on the bike, headlights etc. What happens is that the volt drop on the wiring & switch contacts from passing all this current then presents an artificially low voltage to the regulator sense input which causes a higher output voltage from the alternator.

In my case I wanted to reduce the fluid loss from constantly 'boost' charging the battery way above the normal 'float' plus a bit, typical 14.2v or so. It can make about 0.5V difference.

So I fitted a relay to parallel the main Brown & White wires that are connected by the Ignition switch. Splicing into these near the alternator to keep wire lengths short. There's an unused wire on the Ign Switch which can be used to power the realy on & off in tandem with the switch.

Also helps to avoid wear & failure of the ignition switch.

See the (rough) diagram here:

http://www.triumphrat.net/hinckley-classic-triples/335121-ignition-key-issues.html#post3811097
 

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.... So I fitted a relay to parallel the main Brown & White wires that are connected by the Ignition switch. Splicing into these near the alternator to keep wire lengths short. There's an unused wire on the Ign Switch which can be used to power the realy on & off in tandem with the switch.
So that will certainly give a more accurate feedback to the alternator.

However I would suggest if I may, perhaps better to just get the load out of the ignition circuit altogether and use relay(s) to power the headlight(s) which is the most significant load on the bike anyway. There is not much else in the way of significant load - nor Fuel Pump and the Igniter current is not that much.

Not only will you eliminate the current from the ignition switch, headlight switches and wiring, you will also improve the efficiency of the headlight itself, getting a brighter whiter light. (the light output is directly proportional to the applied voltage - you get voltage drop between battery and lamps because of the current that flows through that circuit - is accumulative through all the elements)
Simple test - start bike - measure voltage across battery then at the headlight socket (note that the socket MUST be connected to the lamp and the lamp actually on!) - be sure to measure between the + & - at the socket, not from socket to ground (or battery -ve) - you can get loss on the negative* component also. Compare the voltage at the lamp with the voltage at the battery.
*you can measure the negative loss independently - just measure voltage between the battery -ve terminal and the headlight socket ground wire. You can improve any loss by running a 14ga wire directly from the battery negative to the socket. This is going to be especially beneficial for the twin headlight bikes (Daytona & Sprint)

I would expect you would not need the relay for the alternator, if the headlight relays are employed.
In the case of the dual headlights, the existing relays just need to be re-configured
For the single headlight model, you will need to add relays

 

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Sure, I think that would produce fairly similar results, Scot, but the logical place for the lighting relay would be the headlight shell & it's already a bit tight in there (tho' a mini style relay would do of course).

Plenty of room near the battery box & the White & Brown wires are near there too as they run down to the alternator. Just leaves the relay feed to run from the headlight shell. In my case it's also proven to be a handy Ig Sw controlled feed point for accessory supplies too. (Piggybacking off the relay connections near the battery.)

But, yeah, some might find a lighting relay more convenient.
 

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Mikes conversion

I've just got around to doing Mikes adjustable regulator conversion as I have a Shorai battery,which along with the dedicated charger/balancer so far is preforming very well (2yrs). Anyway all has gone well and the regulator works a treat,just one question though, should I set it at 4.40v at tickover or at maximum charge with lights on etc at say around 2-3 thousand revs ?
cheers
 

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Revs need to be up to ensure the battery is charging & voltage being limited by the regulator.
 

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Great post thanks.

The rectifier on my 1994 Sprint 900 needs replacing. Down in New Zealand getting parts is hard. It appears that my part number is T1300017.

In the original post I saw the Suzuki rectifier part number (31621-27A00) and worked from there to find these other part numbers...

Kawasaki 13091-1466
Yamaha 4BH-81970-50
K&L Supply 20-3448
Rick’s Motorsport Electrics 30-501

The cheapest option including shipping to NZ seems to be...
https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/Universal-Rectifier-30_501

Any thoughts on this? Any body used one of these???

Cheers
Richard
 

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Richard,

First of all I'd like to complement you on your thorough research of the part numbers. As you likely know, searching those part numbers in Partzilla will tell you the variety of models which use them. So, if you may be able to get a used rectifier or whole used alternator from a Japanese motorcycle. Looked on Ebay yet?



You can guess from the fact that 4 Japanese motorcycles and Triumph have use essentially the same Nippon Denso Alternator that this is a common alternator (or at least it was in the '90s). As a possible expedient solution, I would suggest that you take the whole alternator in to a car parts place and have them cross check part numbers printed on the alternator. You can at least add car models to your options for getting the regulator. You may be able to get a whole automotive alternator from a scrap yard and remove the rectifier for your use. Yet another ebay option!

Good luck!
 

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The wealth of knowledge here is amazing. I took apart my Nippondenso alternator and I took off the coin shaped regulator using a solder iron. I wanted to test the regulator with my multimeter and I touch both pins and it shows a connection. I touch each pin to the regulator body and it shows a connection. Is this normal? Thanks
 
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