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Discussion Starter #1
Just wrote to my dealer about how disappointed I was in the lack of response to my inquiry. It's been at least 13 days since I'd requested some pricing on new footpegs. I wanted to go to them first before I started my internet search, because of the relationship I had with them. But outside of one email reminder to them, and a short "reply all" I got from the GM requesting someone help me, there has been NOTHING.

I told them that there are 2 other Triumph dealers in the Chicago-land area. Why would they risk their existing customer going elsewhere? Just tell me you don't have them! It's enough for me to just get some kind of answer!

Sorry for the rant! Just had to share.
 

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Did you call up the parts dept. first? Should be simple to talk to them and find out one way or the other the price and availability. No go, call up another dealer. Local dealer I don't email, I call.
 

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Local dealer I don't email, I call.
:agree

Heck, if I'm looking for an excuse to go for a ride I show up in person. It's the easiest way to avoid miscommunication.:dunno
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I work during their open hours, so email is the best option for me. And I'm sorry, but in this day and age, if you have a business and an email address for it, it's not too much to ask that you actually monitor that email for incoming inquiries and respond in a timely manner. Otherwise, don't advertise your email. As for riding to it... :) normally... I WOULD do that... if it wasn't 20degrees F and the roads weren't a sheet of ice.
 

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I bought a component for my home audio system and when I email the company in CA with questions I'm lucky to hear back from them within 3 weeks or more. They always tell me sorry for the delay, very busy. As for a car or bike dealership, I would think email is the last thing they think about. Even their web presence is just to look like a modern enterprise. If they push online parts to compete with solely online retailers, then they should respond. I would think that you could spare the time on your lunch break to call them. The time of the year may also come into play. I'm surprised bike shops even have hours in the winter, especially in Chicago. That was the cynic talking.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I disagree completely. This isn't 1995 any more. If you're a business and have an online presence, attend to it. If you have an email address, attend to it. Otherwise don't advertise it. Get your customer service rep to check it once an hour. Hire an intern. Whatever you gotta do. Because, and I'm sure I'm not the only one, I'd rather fire off an email to three dealerships in less than 5 minutes than be on hold with them for my entire lunch.

It's unfortunate that you had to deal with bad customer service. But you don't have to take it. I'd recently bought something from Revzilla... and though I had loads of problems with the actual product, the fact that their customer service was lightning fast and responsive, is going to bring me back to them in a heartbeat.

Bottom line is, as a business owner, you should do whatever it takes, within reason, to secure a long time customer. And to be honest, checking you email a few times a day is the LEAST you can do.
 

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I don't disagree with you. I really don't. But, I don't have much use for dealerships. I've only bought two new bikes in over 30 years of riding and once the initial service is done, I don't go back. Never had any warranty issues. I do my own service. In terms of buying parts, I do use dealerships online and have had good luck with those that I use. I would not invest in anymore time with this dealership and try another one. As far as my poor service, the company is small and as you say, could use some better management in terms of dealing with customers online.
 

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Just wrote to my dealer about how disappointed I was in the lack of response to my inquiry. It's been at least 13 days since I'd requested some pricing on new footpegs. I wanted to go to them first before I started my internet search, because of the relationship I had with them. But outside of one email reminder to them, and a short "reply all" I got from the GM requesting someone help me, there has been NOTHING.

I told them that there are 2 other Triumph dealers in the Chicago-land area. Why would they risk their existing customer going elsewhere? Just tell me you don't have them! It's enough for me to just get some kind of answer!

Sorry for the rant! Just had to share.
I am guessing your between 20-35 year old. Your preferred communication method for convenience and efficiency is email right? Most motorcycle dealers have a high rate of turnover in the sales and parts departments. Many of the people are your age and change employers frequently. There training and experience for the most part is lacking or nonexistent.

Most of the parts guys are stressed doing their jobs with a customer in front of them. Multi brand dealers are even worse because learning four brands systems is harder than one. If the parts guy gets pretty good they can help you on the phone without screwing it up. Alot of emails go unanswered because you get bumped by a person in front of them or a person on the phone. Sometimes the emails go to the marketing person who then has to send them to the parts manager who then gives them to the parts guy.

Can you see where you might be pushing the bolder uphill with the emails? I have been doing business with parts guys for 50 years...first paper manuals, then microfiche, then computers. The medium has changed but if you want the best service nothing beats being there in person.
 

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Dealerships which have been set up to do large mail order volumes, e.g. Hermy's, Baxter Cycles, et al., will respond promptly to mail. If your local dealer provides good service in person or on the phone and you trust them to work on your ride, best to just pick up the phone. If they stock few parts anyway though, you'll get faster service from Hermy's or Baxter's. Poor mail response to parts inquiries doesn't necessarily imply that a dealership is "bad" otherwise. Monitoring mail requires a dedicated body which is overhead.
 

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The medium has changed but if you want the best service nothing beats being there in person.
:agree

It's also the best way to avoid misunderstandings.
 

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My first reaction was, if they can't handle an email exchange then you don't want to trust them with your bike.

But now I think, if you trust them with your bike then be forgiving of their communication skills. Good mechanics you can trust are hard to find.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm older than that, but my age is irrelevant. If you have an email address, and it's listed on your website, then monitor it. If you don't have anyone to monitor it, don't have it advertised and simply say "call for help". That's it. It's that simple.

I am guessing your between 20-35 year old. Your preferred communication method for convenience and efficiency is email right? Most motorcycle dealers have a high rate of turnover in the sales and parts departments. Many of the people are your age and change employers frequently. There training and experience for the most part is lacking or nonexistent.

Most of the parts guys are stressed doing their jobs with a customer in front of them. Multi brand dealers are even worse because learning four brands systems is harder than one. If the parts guy gets pretty good they can help you on the phone without screwing it up. Alot of emails go unanswered because you get bumped by a person in front of them or a person on the phone. Sometimes the emails go to the marketing person who then has to send them to the parts manager who then gives them to the parts guy.

Can you see where you might be pushing the bolder uphill with the emails? I have been doing business with parts guys for 50 years...first paper manuals, then microfiche, then computers. The medium has changed but if you want the best service nothing beats being there in person.
 

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I disagree completely. This isn't 1995 any more. If you're a business and have an online presence, attend to it. If you have an email address, attend to it. Otherwise don't advertise it. Get your customer service rep to check it once an hour. Hire an intern. Whatever you gotta do. Because, and I'm sure I'm not the only one, I'd rather fire off an email to three dealerships in less than 5 minutes than be on hold with them for my entire lunch.

It's unfortunate that you had to deal with bad customer service. But you don't have to take it. I'd recently bought something from Revzilla... and though I had loads of problems with the actual product, the fact that their customer service was lightning fast and responsive, is going to bring me back to them in a heartbeat.

Bottom line is, as a business owner, you should do whatever it takes, within reason, to secure a long time customer. And to be honest, checking you email a few times a day is the LEAST you can do.

I agree with you 100%.

But, as somebody who has worked in the moto-industry on the e-commerce side I can tell you from personal experience that vast majority of suppliers and manufacturers are stuck in the early 2000s at best in terms of their technological sophistication.

You would not believe **** I had to deal with.

So here's my quick little tip in regards to dealing with them.

Just call them on the phone. It's the most immediate way of communication. They can't ignore you once they pick up.

I am a millennial and I appreciate non-verbal / indirect forms of communication but you will never get anything done if you relay on email / live chat.
 

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I'm older than that, but my age is irrelevant. If you have an email address, and it's listed on your website, then monitor it. If you don't have anyone to monitor it, don't have it advertised and simply say "call for help". That's it. It's that simple.





Dis - I remember a line from an old movie that captures your situation, "The boys in Las Vegas would say your trying to make your point the hard way ".

Sounds like you want it your way more than you want the part.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
:laugh2: Oh I'm way past caring about the part. The part, just like my age, is irrelevant at this point. I'm primarily disappointed that in 2019, I can't get a response from a dealership (make that 3 dealerships as of a few days ago) via a method of communication that has been standard in business since the late 90s / early 2000s. Can we not agree at least on that part? That it's ridiculous? I don't care that dealerships are run by people who aren't used to dealing with email. Boo hoo. It's been over two decades. Either learn how to tie it into your business model, or hire someone who can do it! These people are constantly complaining that their customer base is dying off, and riders are getting younger and younger. Yet they can't return an email. That is astounding to me.


I'm older than that, but my age is irrelevant. If you have an email address, and it's listed on your website, then monitor it. If you don't have anyone to monitor it, don't have it advertised and simply say "call for help". That's it. It's that simple.





Dis - I remember a line from an old movie that captures your situation, "The boys in Las Vegas would say your trying to make your point the hard way ".

Sounds like you want it your way more than you want the part.
 

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Dis - I used to get pissed off about poor customer service. It was not email for me but equally aggravating to me. So I took a job at the local Triumph/BMW shop and for two years we improved customer service and sales I might add. The dealer went from number 173 to number 15 in terms of sales in two years and more importantly to the top in customer satisfaction.

I later went on to something more economically satisfying but I still sit down with owners and general managers and go over what the customers see they are doing well or not so well.

I am not suggesting you get job at a motorcycle shop but sitting down with the owners occasionally and letting them know what the customers perceptions are I have found to be useful for everybody. We discuss the good and bad. Most of the good dealers pass the info down and take actions where they ca.
 

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E-Mail vs Phone

E-mail has to become more productive for these dealerships. And it is my preferred business communications (engineering). I can work, group and multitask on 2 or 4 e-mails at a time. If my phone rings during an important customer face to face, I have to leave them standing there while I ignore them.

On the flip side, my Beta dealer prefers e-mail for almost everything. No mis-communication. No one waiting on hold on their lunch hour. Clear documentation string moving forward. Part numbers, availability, price, order confirmed? shipped? Delivered!
 

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E-mail has to become more productive for these dealerships. And it is my preferred business communications (engineering). I can work, group and multitask on 2 or 4 e-mails at a time. If my phone rings during an important customer face to face, I have to leave them standing there while I ignore them.

On the flip side, my Beta dealer prefers e-mail for almost everything. No mis-communication. No one waiting on hold on their lunch hour. Clear documentation string moving forward. Part numbers, availability, price, order confirmed? shipped? Delivered!
Before I retired I was able Program Manager for a large missile program working both development in one phase and production in another phase. Email is okay for simple instruction and direction but leaves too much room for misunderstanding for complex actions.
 
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