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Those dyno results came from a local workshop. It's not DynoJet, and the results are generally... bizarre.
The dyno he uses shows RPM going up to about 9000, and appears to be interpolating from about 5 data points. His results are not faked, but they're not comparable to any other dyno results, as even the baseline plot is nothing like any standard bike.
The percentage gains are about right, but don't imagine your own dyno results will match those unless you go to the same workshop he used.

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Those dyno results came from a local workshop. It's not DynoJet, and the results are generally... bizarre.
The dyno he uses shows RPM going up to about 9000, and appears to be interpolating from about 5 data points. His results are not faked, but they're not comparable to any other dyno results, as even the baseline plot is nothing like any standard bike.
The percentage gains are about right, but don't imagine your own dyno results will match those unless you go to the same workshop he used.

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Curious if you.have dynoed a stock thruxton.
What were the numbers compared to triumph claims? How.much loss through drive train etc

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I don't have a plot on-hand, but when mine was dyno'd back in 2016 it showed about 86rwHP.

So to set a few things straight:
Triumph figures are at the crank, as they're telling you engine power not drive chain, so 96HP is most likely about 85-87 at the crank, suggesting mine was pretty standard.
Manufacturers figures are from the best engine they have available. Some might be 2-8HP less from stock, depending on things like manufacturing tolerances and bad-luck. Race teams will buy five bikes and choose the best to race with.
Most bikes lose ~10-15% on gearbox and chain losses, so you gain more from a well lubed chain than you do from many modifications :)
Torque curves are vastly more useful than power curves. Look for peak torque in the RPM area where ride/race your bike.
The only useful dyno chart is a before/after on the same dyno. Ours read 8.5% low when I arrived, due to an invalid config file from DynoJet. Nobody noticed (or cared) for about seven years.
The difference between two bikes' performance is the area between the two lines on a power or torque curve (both will be equal).
*Don't* try and compare dyno charts between bikes. Always insist on a before/after on the same dyno.
Also *don't* try and compare dyno charts between bikes. Always insist on a before/after on the same dyno.
Did I mention that you should always insist on a before/after on the same dyno?
This means there's little point in posting "Wow, look at the gains my bike made by fitting an XXX!" if you didn't take a measurement beforehand. It's like raving that you "only" weigh 145Kg after 12 months of dieting. For all people know you might have weighed 120Kg at the start :)
 

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I don't have a plot on-hand, but when mine was dyno'd back in 2016 it showed about 86rwHP.



So to set a few things straight:

Triumph figures are at the crank, as they're telling you engine power not drive chain, so 96HP is most likely about 85-87 at the crank, suggesting mine was pretty standard.

Manufacturers figures are from the best engine they have available. Some might be 2-8HP less from stock, depending on things like manufacturing tolerances and bad-luck. Race teams will buy five bikes and choose the best to race with.

Most bikes lose ~10-15% on gearbox and chain losses, so you gain more from a well lubed chain than you do from many modifications :)

Torque curves are vastly more useful than power curves. Look for peak torque in the RPM area where ride/race your bike.

The only useful dyno chart is a before/after on the same dyno. Ours read 8.5% low when I arrived, due to an invalid config file from DynoJet. Nobody noticed (or cared) for about seven years.

The difference between two bikes' performance is the area between the two lines on a power or torque curve (both will be equal).

*Don't* try and compare dyno charts between bikes. Always insist on a before/after on the same dyno.

Also *don't* try and compare dyno charts between bikes. Always insist on a before/after on the same dyno.

Did I mention that you should always insist on a before/after on the same dyno?

This means there's little point in posting "Wow, look at the gains my bike made by fitting an XXX!" if you didn't take a measurement beforehand. It's like raving that you "only" weigh 145Kg after 12 months of dieting. For all people know you might have weighed 120Kg at the start :)
Awesome info. Unfortunately I never got a before dyno figire of my bike.
So. I guess I shouldn't really be concerned about the after. I just care how it rides to be honest. Was hoping you would comment on loss through drive train.
Cheers

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