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I had the TEC Camshaft upgrade installed on my 2018 Street Twin and picked her up today.

There's a 300 mile break in period so I cannot comment (yet) on the power gains over 5,000 RPM, where it really makes a difference. I can give my initial thoughts.

The bike sounds a little different and definitely pulls more easily. Surprise, surprise, she appears to breathing great and running smooth as can be. I did the K&N air filter at the same time, but imagine that's a nominal difference at best. Low-mid range, where she would bog a little if I didn't downshift, she pulls smoothly through now.

I will comment more as I put more miles on her and after she's broken in for sure.

The mechanic who did the work took pictures and documented the entire process for me. He will send them shortly and I can post some.

George at TEC was awesome to deal with and the part arrived on time and went in with no issues. He sells two camshafts for the street twin. One for early serial numbers and one for later models (which I have). There was no negative readings on the valves when the cam went in and the adjustments were pretty straight forward, according to the mechanic. I did send George my serial number to confirm which part I needed.
 

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Did you have to make any changes to fueling, and what did it cost for the mechanic to install the cam?

No changes to fueling. The mechanic quoted me 3-5 hours, and it took him 5 hours, plus ECU reset and a few other minor things. He charged me for 5 hours. My mechanic charges $100 an hour, so it was $500, plus some shims and miscellaneous parts. The total was $600 plus tax.

We reset the ECU to stock and as George said, it searched for a few minutes, realized the cam was there, and began running perfectly. It's as if it was meant for this engine.
 

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WOW! 250 miles in with the new CAM.

George said keep it under high RPM's (5,000 or so was what I figured) for 200 miles. Then you can go crazy, but cruising, keep it under 5,000 RPM's for another 200 miles. After 500 total miles do an oil change.

It's a different bike. She pulls from 2,800-7,200 RPM's now quickly and smooth. The torque is definitely still there, and more of it, but it's above 5,000 RPM's that she's a completely different bike. No more running out of steam. She pulls hard all the way to redline.

When at about 3,300 RPM's, she's torque galore with instant response. Before, she would pull for a second and then start running out of air. Also, below 3,000 RPM's before, she was not happy, almost gasping. Now, she just pulls smoothly. I generally keep her about 3,000 RPM's +, but it was interesting to see her not get bogged down and just pull hard instead.

I had my buddy who works at the bike shop ride her. He was blown away. He says she pulls as hard or harder than 1200 now, especially higher up. He also says the reduced weight helps too. She's quick and light on her feet. He said he understands why they don't offer this in the 900's from the factory. No one would pay $3k more for a 1200 bonneville.

His main ride is a street triple, and the Street Twin, Cam or no Cam is not that. However, she's much quicker, much easier to ride, and if you drive a stock 900 after riding a modified cam one, it will feel like it's choking.

Right now she's making about 63HP and 60 F/T pounds at the wheel. That's up from 49HP at redline and about 53FT/lbs peak. However, the torque is much higher throughout the rev range and HP is dramatically higher after 5,000 RPM's.

If I do a cat-delete exhaust, like the rebel 2-1 that TEC sells, it will bump the power to 67HP at the wheel and 63 F/T pounds at the wheel. I may do that down the road, but for now, I am enjoying my "rocket." :)

Of note, my average fuel mileage went from 54.5mpg to 51.6 mpg. However, I might getting on her a little harder too. Either way, a small price to pay.

Below are a few pictures of the build.
 

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Very cool. I will likely do this with my dealer. They have done some cool builds for customers including a supercharged Thruxton R... 5 hours is not bad at all. I could probably save a few bucks if I just wait till the 10k mile valve check, as they will have to get in there anyway. Might as well have them install the cam and then set the valves and call it a day. Would have them do the X pipe at the same time, I already have the snorkel removed, K&N air filter and opened up the stock cans...

I am gonna go talk to them today and see if it makes sense to wait for the valve check or just pull the trigger and have them do it. That it doesn't need any fueling is awesome...
 

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Very cool. I will likely do this with my dealer. They have done some cool builds for customers including a supercharged Thruxton R... 5 hours is not bad at all. I could probably save a few bucks if I just wait till the 10k mile valve check, as they will have to get in there anyway. Might as well have them install the cam and then set the valves and call it a day. Would have them do the X pipe at the same time, I already have the snorkel removed, K&N air filter and opened up the stock cans...

I am gonna go talk to them today and see if it makes sense to wait for the valve check or just pull the trigger and have them do it. That it doesn't need any fueling is awesome...
I don't think you will regret it.

George told me if you do exhaust, to have the dealer install the Vance & Hines ECU tune from Triumph. It runs richer than stock. He also sells a injector plug kit if you do not have access to the V&H tune, but any dealer should.

If you do not touch the exhaust, it's all good to run the stock ECU.

Also, in case you missed it, George sells two CAMs - one for earlier models and one for later models. Make sure you get him your serial number and get the right one.

Good luck and keep us posted!
 

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Before and after dyno runs would have been great.

I agree. Apparently, it's pretty documented what the stock bike makes.

When I am done with upgrades, I'll consider a dyno run. I didn't want to spend the money now. Seat of the pants - it's a lot more power, but more importantly, qualitatively, it's a much better ride.

I am getting the HP numbers from George's video on Derestricting the 900. I should have said that earlier, full disclosure.
 

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I've done about 1,600 miles since my TEC cam was installed. I've got the V&H high mount tune, Termignoni full exhaust, and air box snorkel removed with stock air filter. The bike works runs great and now pulls hard all the way to the rev limiter. I rode the bike 8,000 miles before the cam install and never hit the rev limiter once. There was just no since in revving it that high because it was done accelerating. Since the cam install I've hit it several times. I wouldn't call it a performance cam, but the bike has noticeably more performance than it did before. I'm eager to see how it matches up with my friends Ducati Scrambler Cafe Racer with Akrapovic and tune.
 

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Great BUT with 300cc more the 1200 is a much more powerful engine plus a 6th gear. Ride a Speed Twin and a Thruxton, they are in a different class. If this solves it for you that is all that matters.
Agreed. I was referring to the 1200 in the Bonneville and Bobber - both heavier bikes.

Speed Twin and Thruxton are a different class.

However. For $9k I have performance that I love and more like a more expensive bike.

I looked at a speed twin but it’s too tall for me. I am very short.

Additionally, if I get another bike, probably a street triple (LRH). Have a classic type and a sport modern.

Thank you for the distinction. I should have clarified.
 

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I have 2000km on my Tec cam and did not expect as much satisfaction as this.
The bike runs super smoothly and as already stated I get to the red-line with ease.
I know have a nimble,nippy modern classic that likes to be thrown around our mountain roads here.
Thanks Tec!
 

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Agreed. I was referring to the 1200 in the Bonneville and Bobber - both heavier bikes.

Speed Twin and Thruxton are a different class.

However. For $9k I have performance that I love and more like a more expensive bike.

I looked at a speed twin but it’s too tall for me. I am very short.

Additionally, if I get another bike, probably a street triple (LRH). Have a classic type and a sport modern.

Thank you for the distinction. I should have clarified.
I’m vertically challenged at 5’8 and they were able to sag the springs so that I can pretty much flat foot the Speed Twin now. It can then be lowered even further with aftermarket shocks.

Just sayin’, don’t write the Speed off. It’s a hell of a fun bike to ride.
 

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I’m vertically challenged at 5’8 and they were able to sag the springs so that I can pretty much flat foot the Speed Twin now. It can then be lowered even further with aftermarket shocks.

Just sayin’, don’t write the Speed off. It’s a hell of a fun bike to ride.
Understood. The Street Twin is my first bike. I race a Formula car, have a 700HP Porsche 911 Turbo, etc, but this is my first bike. I wanted to stay in a safe range for a beginner bike. Speed Twin seemed like a little much in addition to the height. I didn't upgrade the CAM to be a speed demon. However, the bike feels so much better now. I recommend it to anyone who doesn't want their 900 choking.

Having said all that, I would definitely consider a Speed Twin, especially if I can a) lower it and b) can only have one bike. I have taken to going on long rides and I am not sure the Street Triple will be as comfortable. If I get a second bike in the future, well, then, Street Triple would be cool. Again, still working my way up though.

I am 5'4" with short legs. Would have to lower it a bunch.
 

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Talked to my dealer, and we decided to hold off on the cam for now. The bike is brand new, 3 weeks old, and installing the cam will void the warranty on the motor. He said it's better to wait till that first 10k valve check, which would probably be next year or so... by then I will have decided if I will keep the bike long term and the warranty will be more than half over, at least...

So we ordered up a new Brembo radial master cylinder from the Street Triple R and will fit that to help with stopping, a new black lever to match for the clutch, and I just ordered up the progressive spring and preload adjuster kit from TEC USA... Oh, and the X-Pipe. So it will breath a bit better, be a lot louder, stop better and handle better. I already have the Fox shocks on the rear, so the forks being stiffer will help.
 

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WOW! 250 miles in with the new CAM.

George said keep it under high RPM's (5,000 or so was what I figured) for 200 miles. Then you can go crazy, but cruising, keep it under 5,000 RPM's for another 200 miles. After 500 total miles do an oil change.

It's a different bike....
I'll be interested in following how you get on with it.
With that in mind, has anybody experienced any issues post fitment? I've got one waiting in the sidelines for my '18 Street Scrambler.. Its only 6 months old and done 4700kms so I was thinking on waiting a little before I void my warranty..
 

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I'll be interested in following how you get on with it.
With that in mind, has anybody experienced any issues post fitment? I've got one waiting in the sidelines for my '18 Street Scrambler.. Its only 6 months old and done 4700kms so I was thinking on waiting a little before I void my warranty..
I'll keep everyone in the loop.

Almost 400 miles on the the new cam and no issues. George has sold over 300 of these now. I'd imagine we would hear if there were major issues.

He was very clear about adjusting the valves properly. I think if you do that, and break the cam in properly, you should be ok.

Having said that, I understand now wanting to void the warranty. That seems like a personal preference though. For me, it's a different bike and was worth it. However, if something goes wrong, we will see what I say then, right?
 

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I'll keep everyone in the loop.

Almost 400 miles on the the new cam and no issues. George has sold over 300 of these now. I'd imagine we would hear if there were major issues.

He was very clear about adjusting the valves properly. I think if you do that, and break the cam in properly, you should be ok.

Having said that, I understand now wanting to void the warranty. That seems like a personal preference though. For me, it's a different bike and was worth it. However, if something goes wrong, we will see what I say then, right?
Yeah, for me the bike is less than a month old, so nuking the motor's warranty that early on makes me hesitant. So I am just focusing on tires, brakes and suspension and maybe by the time I am due for the 10k valve check, I will be cool with giving up the remainder of the warranty... and at that point they will be in there checking and adjusting valves anyway...
 

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I did it to my Scrambler and am very happy. But it still doesn't pull like the t 120. But it's close and as the 900 is more nimble it will push any 120 until the open road and the 6th gear comes into play.
Funny how everyone is lowering there to flatfoot, I'm going the other way and now can't flat foot 2. But 1 on the peg 1 on the ground is all that's really needed.

Sent from my TA-1033 using Tapatalk
 

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Great BUT with 300cc more the 1200 is a much more powerful engine plus a 6th gear. Ride a Speed Twin and a Thruxton, they are in a different class. If this solves it for you that is all that matters.
Agreed. I have done a cam in my 1200 thruxton. I found around 140km/h it seemed to slow down in the pulling.and just slowly built up speed after that.
Now it easily gets to 180 km/h and hits the cut off. Also had the bike wind up to 9k+ rpm on the dyno . No problems .
Bike loves to sit.around around 6-7 k rpm

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