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Discussion Starter #1
I want to buy a new set of rims for my 1969 Triumph and would like to which would be a better buy the Devon Stainless steel rims or the chrome plated rims. I like the polished stainless but would like to know what has been your experience with both. The durability of the shine in the stainless and how lasting is the chrome. The original rims have a lot corrosion on the inside.
Juan
 

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Stainless all the way and all the time for me. I'll never ever get a rim rechromed again [that is a nightmare trying to get a quality job, retain the maker stamps, and not having the nipples thinned too much]. And I really can't see any advantage buying a new chrome rim....and lots of plus's for the stainless one.

I fitted s/s to my twin many years ago [along with polished s/s spokes] and they are still like new.
 

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Stainless all the way and all the time for me. I'll never ever get a rim rechromed again [that is a nightmare trying to get a quality job, retain the maker stamps, and not having the nipples thinned too much]. And I really can't see any advantage buying a new chrome rim....and lots of plus's for the stainless one.

I fitted s/s to my twin many years ago [along with polished s/s spokes] and they are still like new.
:agree
 

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Me too.
Two bikes with stainless rims and spokes.
Mine are central wheel builders.

Stainless is a bit more yellow than chrome's blue.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello All
Thanks for your advice. I will be buying the devon S/S wheels for my bike. It takes a lot of work to take care of chrome rims and spokes to the point that I don`t use any detergent to clean them just a wet rag and polish. It helps that I have a dehumidifier in my garage working 24/7 to keep rust to a minimum. Humidity here is high like 85% The unit I have keeps it at 30%. I routed a hose from the unit to a water feeder for wild birds. Thanks again.
Juan
 

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Hi Juan,
I have found Devon rims to be a quality product, without distortion at the weld, they seem to ‘true’ easily.
Stainless rims and spokes always look good, a quick wipe and they look like new.
Use Nickel plated brass nipples with stainless steel spokes.
Regards
Peg.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hello Peg
Thanks for the information, I think that is a great piece of advice to avoid the galling of stainless steel on stainless steel. Does Devon sell spoke sets like that? I`m going to call a few places in the US to find out if they have them available.
Juan
 

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Hi Juan,
I have found Devon rims to be a quality product, without distortion at the weld, they seem to ‘true’ easily.
Stainless rims and spokes always look good, a quick wipe and they look like new.
Use Nickel plated brass nipples with stainless steel spokes.
Regards
Peg.
Last year, I put a set of the Rolltru mirror stainless rims, stainless spokes and nickel plated brass nipples on the Vincent. They are very nice. Granted, this was my first lace and true job, but the rims had a bit of run-out and took a lot of tweaking to get close to true. It is possible they were slightly bent in transit to the US.

I plan to obtain a set for my '74 Commando but will have a shop familiar with Nortons do the lace/true. :smile2:

~998cc
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Last year, I put a set of the Rolltru mirror stainless rims, stainless spokes and nickel plated brass nipples on the Vincent. They are very nice. Granted, this was my first lace and true job, but the rims had a bit of run-out and took a lot of tweaking to get close to true. It is possible they were slightly bent in transit to the US.

I plan to obtain a set for my '74 Commando but will have a shop familiar with Nortons do the lace/true. :smile2:

~998cc
Hello 998cc
I placed the order today from Devon directly since I could not find a seller in the US they had suggested British Cycle Supply but when I called they did not have the Rolltru . They came out to about $575.00 with Rolltru spokes and brass nipples with shipping included. I hope they don`t get mangled in transit. I`m going to try to lace them but will seek advice from a friend as I don`t want to damage them.
Juan
 

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Discussion Starter #11
:ItalyFlag Borrani Aluminum Wheel Rims are also an option. Anyone used Borrani's on a vintage Triumph?
Hello blackpony
Paul Dunstall used them in the Dunstall Triumphs he sold and probably some guys used them on their bikes. The Borranis can be bought now from Buchanan Spoke and Rims in the US.
Juan
 

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Hello 998cc
I placed the order today from Devon directly since I could not find a seller in the US they had suggested British Cycle Supply but when I called they did not have the Rolltru . They came out to about $575.00 with Rolltru spokes and brass nipples with shipping included. I hope they don`t get mangled in transit. I`m going to try to lace them but will seek advice from a friend as I don`t want to damage them.
Juan
Hello Juan. The rims are nice. In 1980, Buchanan's superbly built the first set of wheels for my Vincent. Taiwan rims were the only chrome rims they offered and stainless spokes were installed with chrome nipples. Over the next 30-odd years, the chrome plated nipples rusted terribly. Devon's nickel-plated brass nipples will solve that problem and should look great for many years to come.

With a decent truing stand, it's pretty straight forward--Youtube helps. The Norton rim(s) are offset from the hub(s) which is why they will got out to a pro. :)

Post photos of the finished wheels!

All the best.

Russ
~998cc
 

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I only ever had one set of alloy rims on a bike...…….and I went over a cattle ramp/grid at around 120km/h on a sealed road out west [there are heaps of them, you don't bother slowing down unless they look rough] and the impact bent the rim. Never had that happen to me with a steel set.
 

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:GermanyFlag BMW Motorräder have used spoke wheels with alloy rims for over seventy years. BMW bent rims are rare and only happen with "large road pot holes" in Michigan, USA. Galvanic corrosion and electrolysis corrosion is controlled by keeping the wheels clean and dry. No corrosion issues have been experienced by me, even though aluminum is considered an active metal and stainless steel is considered inactive, look at Range Rover bodies, etc.. My 1970, BMW spoke wheels and alloy rims are still in excellent shape. Back in the 1950's, I always envied the alloy rims on the BMW's.

Buchanan Spoke and Rims in the US, https://www.buchananspokes.com, have the proper Borrani rims for Vintage Triumphs. Every rim is drilled and dimpled, as needed, for your motorcycle's hub, ensuring a custom fit and trueness. Kennie Buchanan's Seminar at the 2019 Barber Vintage Festival was excellent. Remember the Golf "T" when lacing your wheel. I prefer the alloy rims for patina, weight savings, trueness and performance! :ChequeredFlag.
 

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Galvanic corrosion and electrolysis corrosion is controlled by keeping the wheels clean and dry.
even though aluminum is considered an active metal and stainless steel is considered inactive,
Please, not this old chestnut again ...

Aluminium alloy rims and stainless spokes should not experience "galvanic corrosion" aka electrolytic corrosion if only because the rim is not in contact with the spokes; even if the nipples are stainless, they're nickel-plated or the much higher risk is seizure of stainless nipple on stainless spoke (aka "galling").

Even when a stainless is notionally in contact with an aluminium alloy (e.g. a stainless screw in an aluminium alloy engine casting), galvanic/electrolytic corrosion does not usually occur because the parent metals are not in contact with one another - if neither the aluminium alloy nor the stainless steel oxidises continuously it's because their initial oxide layers (aluminium in that alloy, chrome in the stainless), once formed, prevent further oxidisation of the parent metals; chemically, it is these oxide layers that are in contact, both are inert, so there isn't any electrolysis.

For galvanic/electrolytic corrosion to occur between "aluminium alloy" and "stainless", either one or both alloys must be of types that do not form oxide layers that prevent further oxidisation (e.g. a 'stainless' that rusts) or the oxide layers must be repeatedly eroded to expose the parent metals (e.g. by vibration between the components?), in the presence of an electrolyte.

This is on t'internet ...

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #16
:GermanyFlag BMW Motorräder have used spoke wheels with alloy rims for over seventy years. BMW bent rims are rare and only happen with "large road pot holes" in Michigan, USA. Galvanic corrosion and electrolysis corrosion is controlled by keeping the wheels clean and dry. No corrosion issues have been experienced by me, even though aluminum is considered an active metal and stainless steel is considered inactive, look at Range Rover bodies, etc.. My 1970, BMW spoke wheels and alloy rims are still in excellent shape. Back in the 1950's, I always envied the alloy rims on the BMW's.

Buchanan Spoke and Rims in the US, https://www.buchananspokes.com, have the proper Borrani rims for Vintage Triumphs. Every rim is drilled and dimpled, as needed, for your motorcycle's hub, ensuring a custom fit and trueness. Kennie Buchanan's Seminar at the 2019 Barber Vintage Festival was excellent. Remember the Golf "T" when lacing your wheel. I prefer the alloy rims for patina, weight savings, trueness and performance! :ChequeredFlag.
Hello Black pony
Is just my bad luck that when I wanted a set of Borranis for my other project bike they were not sold in the US at the time. I emailed them and called them on the phone but they were not making them to fit conical front and back hubs. At the time Buchanan didn`t have them so I bought some Excels from them.

Hello Stuartmac
Thanks for the info in your last post.
Juan
 

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Please, not this old chestnut again ...

Aluminium alloy rims and stainless spokes should not experience "galvanic corrosion" aka electrolytic corrosion if only because the rim is not in contact with the spokes; even if the nipples are stainless, they're nickel-plated or the much higher risk is seizure of stainless nipple on stainless spoke (aka "galling").

Even when a stainless is notionally in contact with an aluminium alloy (e.g. a stainless screw in an aluminium alloy engine casting), galvanic/electrolytic corrosion does not usually occur because the parent metals are not in contact with one another - if neither the aluminium alloy nor the stainless steel oxidises continuously it's because their initial oxide layers (aluminium in that alloy, chrome in the stainless), once formed, prevent further oxidisation of the parent metals; chemically, it is these oxide layers that are in contact, both are inert, so there isn't any electrolysis.

For galvanic/electrolytic corrosion to occur between "aluminium alloy" and "stainless", either one or both alloys must be of types that do not form oxide layers that prevent further oxidisation (e.g. a 'stainless' that rusts) or the oxide layers must be repeatedly eroded to expose the parent metals (e.g. by vibration between the components?), in the presence of an electrolyte.

This is on t'internet ...

Hth.

Regards,

Sorry but you have this wrong Stuart. The electrochemical potential difference between stainless steel and aluminium is in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 V, depending upon the exact alloys involved. This can cause considerable corrosion within months, especially under unfavourable conditions.

So, Blackpony#1 you are spot on; keeping areas where dissimilar metals are in contact, clean and dry, is exactly what should be done to reduce this action but this is a challenge in the UK climate! :)

“Even when a stainless is notionally in contact with an aluminium alloy (e.g. a stainless screw in an aluminium alloy engine casting), galvanic/electrolytic corrosion does not usually occur because the parent metals are not in contact with one another - if neither the aluminium alloy nor the stainless steel oxidises continuously it's because their initial oxide layers (aluminium in that alloy, chrome in the stainless), once formed, prevent further oxidisation of the parent metals”
Interestingly; what I found on my old Land Rover as I restored it, was that corrosion did not form at the point where the stainless bolts were in direct contact with the aluminium alloy. The corrosion was only on the alloy panel directly around the contact point. You can see a good example of this effect here:

714370


The copper wire wrapped around the steel nail causes corrosion, not at the point where the metals are in contact but around them.

When I removed the bolts from the Land Rover, the contact points where the bolts / nuts were against the panels were relatively clean but there was a ring of growing fur (aluminium oxide) around the bolt head. In the worst cases, where only the stainless steel bolt head remained and the aluminium panel had 'dissolved' away completely around it, when I undid the stainless bolt, I was surprised to find a ring of aluminium left under the head! In this particular case, the previous owner fitted stainless bolts to attach the Aluminium seat box to the floor. Now, admittedly the underside of a Land Rover, driven all year round, is going to see plenty of water and some salt too but the engine had deposited a significant amount of oil underside which should have given some protection and as he had only owned the vehicle a few years the corrosion must have been relatively quick.

This is also evident when you look at sacrificial anodes on boats: The Zinc Anode slowly disintegrates as it oxidises but when you change them, the surface between the anode and the steel hull is clean of any oxide. Of course there has to remain a good connection between the two or the anode would only work for a brief time before the oxide forms between the it and the hull, so I assume this will also be the case in your example of stainless bolts in aluminium casings.

However, you are right; let’s not revisit this Old Chestnut here :) There is a pretty good Layman’s guide to Galvanic Corrosion on Wikipedia here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_corrosion

I know you are a fan of Stainless fasteners and have invested time and money replacing all of them all your bikes. As long as you keep the clean and dry (especially away from wet and salty winter UK roads! :) it will be many years before any corrosion is evident. With care they will probably outlast your ownership and beyond. I do agree that stainless look good. I always use to use them too, at least until I saw what happened to the Landy. High-quality zinc plated fasteners look pretty good too and last for years. Most importantly, being only 0.05v apart on the galvanic index, corrosion will take place at a glacial pace, outlasting all of us… :)

Cheers,
Ian
 

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Sorry but you have this wrong Stuart. The electrochemical potential difference between stainless steel and aluminium is in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 V, depending upon the exact alloys involved. This can cause considerable corrosion within months, especially under unfavourable conditions.

So, Blackpony#1 you are spot on; keeping areas where dissimilar metals are in contact, clean and dry, is exactly what should be done to reduce this action but this is a challenge in the UK climate! :)



Interestingly; what I found on my old Land Rover as I restored it, was that corrosion did not form at the point where the stainless bolts were in direct contact with the aluminium alloy. The corrosion was only on the alloy panel directly around the contact point. You can see a good example of this effect here:

View attachment 714370

The copper wire wrapped around the steel nail causes corrosion, not at the point where the metals are in contact but around them.

When I removed the bolts from the Land Rover, the contact points where the bolts / nuts were against the panels were relatively clean but there was a ring of growing fur (aluminium oxide) around the bolt head. In the worst cases, where only the stainless steel bolt head remained and the aluminium panel had 'dissolved' away completely around it, when I undid the stainless bolt, I was surprised to find a ring of aluminium left under the head! In this particular case, the previous owner fitted stainless bolts to attach the Aluminium seat box to the floor. Now, admittedly the underside of a Land Rover, driven all year round, is going to see plenty of water and some salt too but the engine had deposited a significant amount of oil underside which should have given some protection and as he had only owned the vehicle a few years the corrosion must have been relatively quick.

This is also evident when you look at sacrificial anodes on boats: The Zinc Anode slowly disintegrates as it oxidises but when you change them, the surface between the anode and the steel hull is clean of any oxide. Of course there has to remain a good connection between the two or the anode would only work for a brief time before the oxide forms between the it and the hull, so I assume this will also be the case in your example of stainless bolts in aluminium casings.

However, you are right; let’s not revisit this Old Chestnut here :) There is a pretty good Layman’s guide to Galvanic Corrosion on Wikipedia here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_corrosion

I know you are a fan of Stainless fasteners and have invested time and money replacing all of them all your bikes. As long as you keep the clean and dry (especially away from wet and salty winter UK roads! :) it will be many years before any corrosion is evident. With care they will probably outlast your ownership and beyond. I do agree that stainless look good. I always use to use them too, at least until I saw what happened to the Landy. High-quality zinc plated fasteners look pretty good too and last for years. Most importantly, being only 0.05v apart on the galvanic index, corrosion will take place at a glacial pace, outlasting all of us… :)

Cheers,
Ian
Strange post ... :confused:
 
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